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Immunotherapy: Is it different for sarcomas?

Cleton-Jansen AM, Buddingh EP, Lankester AC - Oncoimmunology (2012)

Bottom Line: The Janus-faced roles of macrophages in cancer imply both tumor-suppressive and -stimulating actions of these innate immune cells.Whereas the balance is toward tumor promotion in most epithelial cancers, we have recently shown that osteosarcoma metastasis seems to be inhibited by macrophages.Here we discuss the possible mechanism of this observation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology; Leiden University Medical Center; Leiden, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The Janus-faced roles of macrophages in cancer imply both tumor-suppressive and -stimulating actions of these innate immune cells. Whereas the balance is toward tumor promotion in most epithelial cancers, we have recently shown that osteosarcoma metastasis seems to be inhibited by macrophages. Here we discuss the possible mechanism of this observation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Figure 1. Osteosarcoma samples are infiltrated with CD14 and CD163 single and double positive macrophages. Spectral imaging was used to reduce autofluorescence of osteosarcoma cells. In the composite image, CD14-positive cells are represented in green, CD163-positive cells are represented in red, and CD14/CD163 double positive cells are represented in yellow. Background autofluorescence of tumor cells is represented in gray.
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Figure 1: Figure 1. Osteosarcoma samples are infiltrated with CD14 and CD163 single and double positive macrophages. Spectral imaging was used to reduce autofluorescence of osteosarcoma cells. In the composite image, CD14-positive cells are represented in green, CD163-positive cells are represented in red, and CD14/CD163 double positive cells are represented in yellow. Background autofluorescence of tumor cells is represented in gray.

Mentions: Neither the mechanism of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma is clarified, nor the contrast with epithelial tumors. It may be sought in the different flavors of macrophages that are distinguishable by specific markers. M1 are tumor suppressive, M2 support invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of tumor cells. We assessed the nature of the tumor associated macrophages in osteosarcoma clinical samples using HLA-DRα, associated with M1 macrophages and CD163, a marker to distinguish M2. Surprisingly both types of macrophages were present in the tumor tissues analyzed (Fig. 1). Recent perceptions on the good vs. bad macrophages are more nuanced. Macrophages are considered as quite flexible cells that polarize to a certain direction, but are not destined to stay that way.


Immunotherapy: Is it different for sarcomas?

Cleton-Jansen AM, Buddingh EP, Lankester AC - Oncoimmunology (2012)

Figure 1. Osteosarcoma samples are infiltrated with CD14 and CD163 single and double positive macrophages. Spectral imaging was used to reduce autofluorescence of osteosarcoma cells. In the composite image, CD14-positive cells are represented in green, CD163-positive cells are represented in red, and CD14/CD163 double positive cells are represented in yellow. Background autofluorescence of tumor cells is represented in gray.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376989&req=5

Figure 1: Figure 1. Osteosarcoma samples are infiltrated with CD14 and CD163 single and double positive macrophages. Spectral imaging was used to reduce autofluorescence of osteosarcoma cells. In the composite image, CD14-positive cells are represented in green, CD163-positive cells are represented in red, and CD14/CD163 double positive cells are represented in yellow. Background autofluorescence of tumor cells is represented in gray.
Mentions: Neither the mechanism of metastasis suppression in osteosarcoma is clarified, nor the contrast with epithelial tumors. It may be sought in the different flavors of macrophages that are distinguishable by specific markers. M1 are tumor suppressive, M2 support invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of tumor cells. We assessed the nature of the tumor associated macrophages in osteosarcoma clinical samples using HLA-DRα, associated with M1 macrophages and CD163, a marker to distinguish M2. Surprisingly both types of macrophages were present in the tumor tissues analyzed (Fig. 1). Recent perceptions on the good vs. bad macrophages are more nuanced. Macrophages are considered as quite flexible cells that polarize to a certain direction, but are not destined to stay that way.

Bottom Line: The Janus-faced roles of macrophages in cancer imply both tumor-suppressive and -stimulating actions of these innate immune cells.Whereas the balance is toward tumor promotion in most epithelial cancers, we have recently shown that osteosarcoma metastasis seems to be inhibited by macrophages.Here we discuss the possible mechanism of this observation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology; Leiden University Medical Center; Leiden, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The Janus-faced roles of macrophages in cancer imply both tumor-suppressive and -stimulating actions of these innate immune cells. Whereas the balance is toward tumor promotion in most epithelial cancers, we have recently shown that osteosarcoma metastasis seems to be inhibited by macrophages. Here we discuss the possible mechanism of this observation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus