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Stimulus-dependent modulation of perceptual and motor learning in a serial reaction time task.

Kirsch W, Hoffmann J - Adv Cogn Psychol (2012)

Bottom Line: Two sequences were used, in which structural regularities occurred either in the horizontal or in the vertical locations of successive stimuli.This pattern of results was independent of whether three fingers (Experiment 1) were used or only one finger (Experiment 2) was used for responding.This result suggests that perceptual and motor learning mechanisms may be weighted differently depending on the context in which the stimulus is presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In two experiments, we investigated the impact of spatial attributes on the representation acquired during a serial reaction time task. Two sequences were used, in which structural regularities occurred either in the horizontal or in the vertical locations of successive stimuli. After training with the dominant hand, participants were required to respond with the non-dominant hand to either the original sequence or to a mirror-ordered version of the original sequence that required finger movements homologous to those used during training. We observed that a difference in reaction times between the two transfer conditions was smaller in the vertical sequence than in the horizontal sequence. This pattern of results was independent of whether three fingers (Experiment 1) were used or only one finger (Experiment 2) was used for responding. This result suggests that perceptual and motor learning mechanisms may be weighted differently depending on the context in which the stimulus is presented.

No MeSH data available.


Mean intermanual transfer costs in Experiment 2. Error bars representstandard errors.
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Figure 5: Mean intermanual transfer costs in Experiment 2. Error bars representstandard errors.

Mentions: As shown in Figure 4, the performancepattern achieved with one finger in this experiment was very similar to thatobtained with three fingers in Experiment 1. The regular structure wasefficiently learned with the dominant hand in both sequence conditions, asindicated by the significant differences between the random block and thefollowing structure block. Mean differences were 196 ms (SD =68.11) for the horizontal sequence and 217 ms (SD = 72.79) forthe vertical sequence; t(13) = 10.75, p<.001, for the horizontal condition; t(13) = 11.13,p < .001 for the vertical condition. The differencebetween the two conditions was not significant, t(26) = 0.79,p = .437. Moreover, we conducted an ANOVA to analyze theintermanual transfer costs. The Sequence Type served as the between-subjectsvariable, and Transfer Type served as the within-subjects factor, and the RTdifferences between Block 14 and the parallel and mirror transfer blocks wereused. The results yielded a significant main effect of transfer type,F(1, 26) = 172.37, p < .001, partialη2 = .869, and a significant interaction between TransferType and Sequence Type, F(1, 26) = 10.46, p =.003, partial η2 = .287. As shown in Figure 5, the difference in transfer costs between theparallel and the mirror conditions was larger for the horizontal sequence (131ms) compared with the vertical sequence (79 ms). However, as in Experiment 1,additional analyses computed separately for each transfer condition did notreveal significant differences between the two sequences, witht(26) = 1.56, p = .130, for the paralleltransfer and t(26) = 1.12, p = .273, for themirror transfer.


Stimulus-dependent modulation of perceptual and motor learning in a serial reaction time task.

Kirsch W, Hoffmann J - Adv Cogn Psychol (2012)

Mean intermanual transfer costs in Experiment 2. Error bars representstandard errors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376890&req=5

Figure 5: Mean intermanual transfer costs in Experiment 2. Error bars representstandard errors.
Mentions: As shown in Figure 4, the performancepattern achieved with one finger in this experiment was very similar to thatobtained with three fingers in Experiment 1. The regular structure wasefficiently learned with the dominant hand in both sequence conditions, asindicated by the significant differences between the random block and thefollowing structure block. Mean differences were 196 ms (SD =68.11) for the horizontal sequence and 217 ms (SD = 72.79) forthe vertical sequence; t(13) = 10.75, p<.001, for the horizontal condition; t(13) = 11.13,p < .001 for the vertical condition. The differencebetween the two conditions was not significant, t(26) = 0.79,p = .437. Moreover, we conducted an ANOVA to analyze theintermanual transfer costs. The Sequence Type served as the between-subjectsvariable, and Transfer Type served as the within-subjects factor, and the RTdifferences between Block 14 and the parallel and mirror transfer blocks wereused. The results yielded a significant main effect of transfer type,F(1, 26) = 172.37, p < .001, partialη2 = .869, and a significant interaction between TransferType and Sequence Type, F(1, 26) = 10.46, p =.003, partial η2 = .287. As shown in Figure 5, the difference in transfer costs between theparallel and the mirror conditions was larger for the horizontal sequence (131ms) compared with the vertical sequence (79 ms). However, as in Experiment 1,additional analyses computed separately for each transfer condition did notreveal significant differences between the two sequences, witht(26) = 1.56, p = .130, for the paralleltransfer and t(26) = 1.12, p = .273, for themirror transfer.

Bottom Line: Two sequences were used, in which structural regularities occurred either in the horizontal or in the vertical locations of successive stimuli.This pattern of results was independent of whether three fingers (Experiment 1) were used or only one finger (Experiment 2) was used for responding.This result suggests that perceptual and motor learning mechanisms may be weighted differently depending on the context in which the stimulus is presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Würzburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In two experiments, we investigated the impact of spatial attributes on the representation acquired during a serial reaction time task. Two sequences were used, in which structural regularities occurred either in the horizontal or in the vertical locations of successive stimuli. After training with the dominant hand, participants were required to respond with the non-dominant hand to either the original sequence or to a mirror-ordered version of the original sequence that required finger movements homologous to those used during training. We observed that a difference in reaction times between the two transfer conditions was smaller in the vertical sequence than in the horizontal sequence. This pattern of results was independent of whether three fingers (Experiment 1) were used or only one finger (Experiment 2) was used for responding. This result suggests that perceptual and motor learning mechanisms may be weighted differently depending on the context in which the stimulus is presented.

No MeSH data available.