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Proteomics for biomedicine: a half-completed journey.

Mann M - EMBO Mol Med (2012)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Munich, Germany. mmann@biochem.mpg.de

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Although I studied physics and mathematics until the master's level, I always knew that I wanted to get into biology, whose golden age I was sure was happening in my lifetime... When the opportunity came knocking – in the shape of John Fenn, who was spending a sabbatical at the University of Göttingen – I did not hesitate to take up his offer to come with him to Yale for my PhD... At first there was little interest in ‘electrospray’, but as soon as it became clear that large, intact proteins survive this process (Mann et al, ; Meng et al, ), the community was hooked... When in 1992 I was offered a group leader position at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), I took one of the most ambitious and stressful decisions of my professional life: I bet everything on the success of mass spectrometry (MS)-based protein characterization... Fortunately, we soon made two crucial breakthroughs: Matthias Wilm devised nanoelectrospray, a miniaturized and highly sensitive form of electrospray, and Andrej Shevchenko developed protocols for liberating proteins from gels so that they could be analysed by MS... Together with our novel bioinformatic algorithms (Mann & Wilm, ), and the beginning genome sequencing efforts, this enabled identification of minute amounts of protein – far exceeding the capabilities of Edman sequencing and firmly establishing mass spectrometry in molecular biology research (Wilm et al, )... It is clear that there is now an opportunity to make a great clinical impact using high resolution and robust proteomics technologies (Fig 2)... In conclusion, whenever one really wants to understand biological function, one has to deal with proteins and mass spectrometry is the method of choice to do this... So, what does the future hold for proteomics and where will it make unique contributions? Areas to watch include the analysis of complete mammalian proteomes, including absolute quantification of cellular proteins, increasingly sophisticated studies of the function of thousands of post-translational modifications as well as protein interaction studies... Proteomics is starting to be used to probe the effects of genome variation between humans at the functional level and I predict that this will be an expanding area... In a slightly longer perspective, proteomics will become an important basis on which systems biological modelling of the cell will be built (Cox & Mann, ).

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Workflow of high resolution and quantitative proteomics.
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fig01: Workflow of high resolution and quantitative proteomics.

Mentions: In 2005, I moved to the Max-Planck Institute of biochemistry in Martinsried (Munich) where we diversified into a variety of biological and medical directions while keeping our core emphasis on instrumentation and bioinformatics. The Max-Planck institutes are fantastic environments for science in general and for our work in particular. Here, my group is able to work on the entire chain of proteomics – from technologies of proteomic sample preparation, through chromatographic and mass spectrometric innovations to methods in computational proteomics (Fig 1). Bioinformatics development connected to the analysis of proteomics data sets has always been a major focus in my group but in Martinsried it was kicked into high gear by Jürgen Cox. He developed the MaxQuant suite of proteomics tools that are now widely used by the community to analysed proteomics datasets (Cox & Mann, 2008). We then apply all these technologies to a wide range of biological problems; partly to show that proteomics can be a powerful tool in these different fields.


Proteomics for biomedicine: a half-completed journey.

Mann M - EMBO Mol Med (2012)

Workflow of high resolution and quantitative proteomics.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376839&req=5

fig01: Workflow of high resolution and quantitative proteomics.
Mentions: In 2005, I moved to the Max-Planck Institute of biochemistry in Martinsried (Munich) where we diversified into a variety of biological and medical directions while keeping our core emphasis on instrumentation and bioinformatics. The Max-Planck institutes are fantastic environments for science in general and for our work in particular. Here, my group is able to work on the entire chain of proteomics – from technologies of proteomic sample preparation, through chromatographic and mass spectrometric innovations to methods in computational proteomics (Fig 1). Bioinformatics development connected to the analysis of proteomics data sets has always been a major focus in my group but in Martinsried it was kicked into high gear by Jürgen Cox. He developed the MaxQuant suite of proteomics tools that are now widely used by the community to analysed proteomics datasets (Cox & Mann, 2008). We then apply all these technologies to a wide range of biological problems; partly to show that proteomics can be a powerful tool in these different fields.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, Munich, Germany. mmann@biochem.mpg.de

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Although I studied physics and mathematics until the master's level, I always knew that I wanted to get into biology, whose golden age I was sure was happening in my lifetime... When the opportunity came knocking – in the shape of John Fenn, who was spending a sabbatical at the University of Göttingen – I did not hesitate to take up his offer to come with him to Yale for my PhD... At first there was little interest in ‘electrospray’, but as soon as it became clear that large, intact proteins survive this process (Mann et al, ; Meng et al, ), the community was hooked... When in 1992 I was offered a group leader position at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), I took one of the most ambitious and stressful decisions of my professional life: I bet everything on the success of mass spectrometry (MS)-based protein characterization... Fortunately, we soon made two crucial breakthroughs: Matthias Wilm devised nanoelectrospray, a miniaturized and highly sensitive form of electrospray, and Andrej Shevchenko developed protocols for liberating proteins from gels so that they could be analysed by MS... Together with our novel bioinformatic algorithms (Mann & Wilm, ), and the beginning genome sequencing efforts, this enabled identification of minute amounts of protein – far exceeding the capabilities of Edman sequencing and firmly establishing mass spectrometry in molecular biology research (Wilm et al, )... It is clear that there is now an opportunity to make a great clinical impact using high resolution and robust proteomics technologies (Fig 2)... In conclusion, whenever one really wants to understand biological function, one has to deal with proteins and mass spectrometry is the method of choice to do this... So, what does the future hold for proteomics and where will it make unique contributions? Areas to watch include the analysis of complete mammalian proteomes, including absolute quantification of cellular proteins, increasingly sophisticated studies of the function of thousands of post-translational modifications as well as protein interaction studies... Proteomics is starting to be used to probe the effects of genome variation between humans at the functional level and I predict that this will be an expanding area... In a slightly longer perspective, proteomics will become an important basis on which systems biological modelling of the cell will be built (Cox & Mann, ).

Show MeSH