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Seroprevalence of Schmallenberg virus antibodies among dairy cattle, the Netherlands, winter 2011-2012.

Elbers AR, Loeffen WL, Quak S, de Boer-Luijtze E, van der Spek AN, Bouwstra R, Maas R, Spierenburg MA, de Kluijver EP, van Schaik G, van der Poel WH - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: Seroprevalence was significantly higher in the central-eastern part of the Netherlands than in the northern and southern regions (p<0.001).In addition, high (70%-100%) within-herd seroprevalence was observed in 2 SBV-infected dairy herds and 2 SBV-infected sheep herds.No significant differences were found in age-specific prevalence of antibodies against SBV, which is an indication that SBV is newly arrived in the country.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Crisis Organisation and Diagnostics, Central Veterinary Institute, part of Wageningen UR, Lelystad, the Netherlands. armin.elbers@wur.nl

ABSTRACT
Infections with Schmallenberg virus (SBV) are associated with congenital malformations in ruminants. Because reporting of suspected cases only could underestimate the true rate of infection, we conducted a seroprevalence study in the Netherlands to detect past exposure to SBV among dairy cattle. A total of 1,123 serum samples collected from cattle during November 2011-January 2012 were tested for antibodies against SBV by using a virus neutralization test; seroprevalence was 72.5%. Seroprevalence was significantly higher in the central-eastern part of the Netherlands than in the northern and southern regions (p<0.001). In addition, high (70%-100%) within-herd seroprevalence was observed in 2 SBV-infected dairy herds and 2 SBV-infected sheep herds. No significant differences were found in age-specific prevalence of antibodies against SBV, which is an indication that SBV is newly arrived in the country.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Geographic distribution of dairy herds from which 1–4 animals were sampled (red dots) in study of Schmallenberg virus seroprevalence, the Netherlands, 2011–2012. Cattle density is indicated by gray shading; blue outlines denote regional borders.
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Figure 1: Geographic distribution of dairy herds from which 1–4 animals were sampled (red dots) in study of Schmallenberg virus seroprevalence, the Netherlands, 2011–2012. Cattle density is indicated by gray shading; blue outlines denote regional borders.

Mentions: In addition to estimating seroprevalence of SBV in the dairy cattle population in the Netherlands, we estimated the seroprevalence in the dairy cattle population by 3 regions in the Netherlands to determine possible regional differences in seroprevalence. These regions were the northern part of the Netherlands (465 samples), comprising Groningen, Friesland, Drenthe, and Noord-Holland Provinces; the southern part of the Netherlands (196 samples), comprising Zeeland, Zuid-Holland, Noord-Brabant, and Limburg Provinces; and the central-eastern part of the Netherlands (462 samples), comprising Overijssel, Gelderland, Flevoland, and Utrecht Provinces. A cattle density map on municipality level was created on the basis of the number of cattle per municipality as received from the “Dienst Regelingen” from the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation. Figure 1 shows the geographic distribution of dairy herds from which we tested, on average, 2 dairy cattle. The data indicate that our sampling was indeed representative for the geographic distribution of cattle in the Netherlands.


Seroprevalence of Schmallenberg virus antibodies among dairy cattle, the Netherlands, winter 2011-2012.

Elbers AR, Loeffen WL, Quak S, de Boer-Luijtze E, van der Spek AN, Bouwstra R, Maas R, Spierenburg MA, de Kluijver EP, van Schaik G, van der Poel WH - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Geographic distribution of dairy herds from which 1–4 animals were sampled (red dots) in study of Schmallenberg virus seroprevalence, the Netherlands, 2011–2012. Cattle density is indicated by gray shading; blue outlines denote regional borders.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376820&req=5

Figure 1: Geographic distribution of dairy herds from which 1–4 animals were sampled (red dots) in study of Schmallenberg virus seroprevalence, the Netherlands, 2011–2012. Cattle density is indicated by gray shading; blue outlines denote regional borders.
Mentions: In addition to estimating seroprevalence of SBV in the dairy cattle population in the Netherlands, we estimated the seroprevalence in the dairy cattle population by 3 regions in the Netherlands to determine possible regional differences in seroprevalence. These regions were the northern part of the Netherlands (465 samples), comprising Groningen, Friesland, Drenthe, and Noord-Holland Provinces; the southern part of the Netherlands (196 samples), comprising Zeeland, Zuid-Holland, Noord-Brabant, and Limburg Provinces; and the central-eastern part of the Netherlands (462 samples), comprising Overijssel, Gelderland, Flevoland, and Utrecht Provinces. A cattle density map on municipality level was created on the basis of the number of cattle per municipality as received from the “Dienst Regelingen” from the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation. Figure 1 shows the geographic distribution of dairy herds from which we tested, on average, 2 dairy cattle. The data indicate that our sampling was indeed representative for the geographic distribution of cattle in the Netherlands.

Bottom Line: Seroprevalence was significantly higher in the central-eastern part of the Netherlands than in the northern and southern regions (p<0.001).In addition, high (70%-100%) within-herd seroprevalence was observed in 2 SBV-infected dairy herds and 2 SBV-infected sheep herds.No significant differences were found in age-specific prevalence of antibodies against SBV, which is an indication that SBV is newly arrived in the country.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, Crisis Organisation and Diagnostics, Central Veterinary Institute, part of Wageningen UR, Lelystad, the Netherlands. armin.elbers@wur.nl

ABSTRACT
Infections with Schmallenberg virus (SBV) are associated with congenital malformations in ruminants. Because reporting of suspected cases only could underestimate the true rate of infection, we conducted a seroprevalence study in the Netherlands to detect past exposure to SBV among dairy cattle. A total of 1,123 serum samples collected from cattle during November 2011-January 2012 were tested for antibodies against SBV by using a virus neutralization test; seroprevalence was 72.5%. Seroprevalence was significantly higher in the central-eastern part of the Netherlands than in the northern and southern regions (p<0.001). In addition, high (70%-100%) within-herd seroprevalence was observed in 2 SBV-infected dairy herds and 2 SBV-infected sheep herds. No significant differences were found in age-specific prevalence of antibodies against SBV, which is an indication that SBV is newly arrived in the country.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus