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Timeliness of nongovernmental versus governmental global outbreak communications.

Mondor L, Brownstein JS, Chan E, Madoff LC, Pollack MP, Buckeridge DL, Brewer TF - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: To compare the timeliness of nongovernmental and governmental communications of infectious disease outbreaks and evaluate trends for each over time, we investigated the time elapsed from the beginning of an outbreak to public reporting of the event.We found that governmental sources improved the timeliness of public reporting of infectious disease outbreaks during the study period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT
To compare the timeliness of nongovernmental and governmental communications of infectious disease outbreaks and evaluate trends for each over time, we investigated the time elapsed from the beginning of an outbreak to public reporting of the event. We found that governmental sources improved the timeliness of public reporting of infectious disease outbreaks during the study period.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Median time (days) from the estimated start of an outbreak to its public communication for outbreaks reported by nongovernmental sources (A) and governmental sources (B), 1996–2009. Trendlines show average improvements over the study period.
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Figure 2: Median time (days) from the estimated start of an outbreak to its public communication for outbreaks reported by nongovernmental sources (A) and governmental sources (B), 1996–2009. Trendlines show average improvements over the study period.

Mentions: Examination of temporal trends over the study period (Figure 2) showed that nongovernmental sources generally communicated outbreak signals to the public faster after 1996, although the trend did not reach statistical significance (IRR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.91–1.01). Governmental sources, in contrast, made significant improvements in lessening the time in which they publicly communicated initial outbreak signals (IRR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.91–0.97).


Timeliness of nongovernmental versus governmental global outbreak communications.

Mondor L, Brownstein JS, Chan E, Madoff LC, Pollack MP, Buckeridge DL, Brewer TF - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Median time (days) from the estimated start of an outbreak to its public communication for outbreaks reported by nongovernmental sources (A) and governmental sources (B), 1996–2009. Trendlines show average improvements over the study period.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376818&req=5

Figure 2: Median time (days) from the estimated start of an outbreak to its public communication for outbreaks reported by nongovernmental sources (A) and governmental sources (B), 1996–2009. Trendlines show average improvements over the study period.
Mentions: Examination of temporal trends over the study period (Figure 2) showed that nongovernmental sources generally communicated outbreak signals to the public faster after 1996, although the trend did not reach statistical significance (IRR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.91–1.01). Governmental sources, in contrast, made significant improvements in lessening the time in which they publicly communicated initial outbreak signals (IRR = 0.94, 95% CI 0.91–0.97).

Bottom Line: To compare the timeliness of nongovernmental and governmental communications of infectious disease outbreaks and evaluate trends for each over time, we investigated the time elapsed from the beginning of an outbreak to public reporting of the event.We found that governmental sources improved the timeliness of public reporting of infectious disease outbreaks during the study period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT
To compare the timeliness of nongovernmental and governmental communications of infectious disease outbreaks and evaluate trends for each over time, we investigated the time elapsed from the beginning of an outbreak to public reporting of the event. We found that governmental sources improved the timeliness of public reporting of infectious disease outbreaks during the study period.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus