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Assessment of public health events through International Health Regulations, United States, 2007-2011.

Kohl KS, Arthur RR, O'Connor R, Fernandez J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: During July 2007-December 2011, WHO assessed and posted on a secure web portal 222 events from 105 states parties, including 24 events from the United States.Additional US events involved 5 Salmonella spp. outbreaks, botulism, Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections, Guillain-Barré syndrome, contaminated heparin, Lassa fever, an oil spill, and typhoid fever.Rapid information exchange among WHO and member states facilitated by the International Health Regulations leads to better situation awareness of emerging threats and enables a more coordinated and transparent global response.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. kkohl@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
Under the current International Health Regulations, 194 states parties are obligated to report potential public health emergencies of international concern to the World Health Organization (WHO) within 72 hours of becoming aware of an event. During July 2007-December 2011, WHO assessed and posted on a secure web portal 222 events from 105 states parties, including 24 events from the United States. Twelve US events involved human influenza caused by a new virus subtype, including the first report of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, which constitutes the only public health emergency of international concern determined by the WHO director-general to date. Additional US events involved 5 Salmonella spp. outbreaks, botulism, Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections, Guillain-Barré syndrome, contaminated heparin, Lassa fever, an oil spill, and typhoid fever. Rapid information exchange among WHO and member states facilitated by the International Health Regulations leads to better situation awareness of emerging threats and enables a more coordinated and transparent global response.

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Twenty-four public health events in the United States assessed by the World Health Organization and posted on the International Health Regulations information site, July 2007–December 2011. There was 1 event of botulism and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2007; 1 event related to heparin and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2008; 5 events of influenza, 1 event of Escherichia coli infection, and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2009; 3 events of influenza, 1 event of Lassa fever, 1 event related to an oil spill, 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection, and 1 event of typhoid fever in 2010; and 4 events of influenza, 1 event of Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2011.
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F-2-1: Twenty-four public health events in the United States assessed by the World Health Organization and posted on the International Health Regulations information site, July 2007–December 2011. There was 1 event of botulism and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2007; 1 event related to heparin and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2008; 5 events of influenza, 1 event of Escherichia coli infection, and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2009; 3 events of influenza, 1 event of Lassa fever, 1 event related to an oil spill, 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection, and 1 event of typhoid fever in 2010; and 4 events of influenza, 1 event of Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2011.

Mentions: During July 2007–December 2011, WHO posted 222 events from 105 member states assessed by WHO on the IHR EIS, including 24 events from the United States (Figure). Half of the events from the United States involved human influenza caused by a new virus subtype (12 events), followed by Salmonella spp. outbreaks (5 events) (8–12) and 1 event each for botulism (13), contaminated heparin (14), Escherichia coli O157:H7 (15), an oil spill (16), Lassa fever (17), Guillain-Barré syndrome (18), and typhoid fever (19) (Table).


Assessment of public health events through International Health Regulations, United States, 2007-2011.

Kohl KS, Arthur RR, O'Connor R, Fernandez J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Twenty-four public health events in the United States assessed by the World Health Organization and posted on the International Health Regulations information site, July 2007–December 2011. There was 1 event of botulism and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2007; 1 event related to heparin and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2008; 5 events of influenza, 1 event of Escherichia coli infection, and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2009; 3 events of influenza, 1 event of Lassa fever, 1 event related to an oil spill, 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection, and 1 event of typhoid fever in 2010; and 4 events of influenza, 1 event of Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2011.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376817&req=5

F-2-1: Twenty-four public health events in the United States assessed by the World Health Organization and posted on the International Health Regulations information site, July 2007–December 2011. There was 1 event of botulism and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2007; 1 event related to heparin and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2008; 5 events of influenza, 1 event of Escherichia coli infection, and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2009; 3 events of influenza, 1 event of Lassa fever, 1 event related to an oil spill, 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection, and 1 event of typhoid fever in 2010; and 4 events of influenza, 1 event of Guillain-Barré syndrome, and 1 event of Salmonella sp. infection in 2011.
Mentions: During July 2007–December 2011, WHO posted 222 events from 105 member states assessed by WHO on the IHR EIS, including 24 events from the United States (Figure). Half of the events from the United States involved human influenza caused by a new virus subtype (12 events), followed by Salmonella spp. outbreaks (5 events) (8–12) and 1 event each for botulism (13), contaminated heparin (14), Escherichia coli O157:H7 (15), an oil spill (16), Lassa fever (17), Guillain-Barré syndrome (18), and typhoid fever (19) (Table).

Bottom Line: During July 2007-December 2011, WHO assessed and posted on a secure web portal 222 events from 105 states parties, including 24 events from the United States.Additional US events involved 5 Salmonella spp. outbreaks, botulism, Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections, Guillain-Barré syndrome, contaminated heparin, Lassa fever, an oil spill, and typhoid fever.Rapid information exchange among WHO and member states facilitated by the International Health Regulations leads to better situation awareness of emerging threats and enables a more coordinated and transparent global response.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. kkohl@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
Under the current International Health Regulations, 194 states parties are obligated to report potential public health emergencies of international concern to the World Health Organization (WHO) within 72 hours of becoming aware of an event. During July 2007-December 2011, WHO assessed and posted on a secure web portal 222 events from 105 states parties, including 24 events from the United States. Twelve US events involved human influenza caused by a new virus subtype, including the first report of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, which constitutes the only public health emergency of international concern determined by the WHO director-general to date. Additional US events involved 5 Salmonella spp. outbreaks, botulism, Escherichia coli O157:H7 infections, Guillain-Barré syndrome, contaminated heparin, Lassa fever, an oil spill, and typhoid fever. Rapid information exchange among WHO and member states facilitated by the International Health Regulations leads to better situation awareness of emerging threats and enables a more coordinated and transparent global response.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus