Limits...
Loss of household protection from use of insecticide-treated nets against pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes, benin.

Asidi A, N'Guessan R, Akogbeto M, Curtis C, Rowland M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: By contrast, sleeping under an ITN in the location with susceptible mosquitoes decreased the odds of biting by 66%.ITNs provide little or no protection once the mosquitoes become resistant and the netting acquires holes.Resistance seriously threatens malaria control strategies based on ITN.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Pyrethroid resistance is becoming widespread in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, coinciding with expanded use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) throughout Africa. To investigate whether nets in use are still protective, we conducted household trials in northern and southern Benin, where An. gambiae mosquitoes are susceptible and resistant, respectively, to pyrethroids. Rooms were fitted with window traps and monitored for mosquito biting and survival rates before and after the nets were treated with pyrethroid. Sleeping under an ITN in the location with resistant mosquitoes was no more protective than sleeping under an untreated net, regardless of its physical condition. By contrast, sleeping under an ITN in the location with susceptible mosquitoes decreased the odds of biting by 66%. ITNs provide little or no protection once the mosquitoes become resistant and the netting acquires holes. Resistance seriously threatens malaria control strategies based on ITN.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Death rates of Anopheles gambiae s.l. mosquitoes collected in exit traps at Mallanville (where mosquitoes are pyrethroid susceptible) in northern Benin and Fifadji (where mosquitoes are pyrethroid resistant) in southern Benin, 2008. Error bars indicate 95% CIs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376816&req=5

Figure 1: Death rates of Anopheles gambiae s.l. mosquitoes collected in exit traps at Mallanville (where mosquitoes are pyrethroid susceptible) in northern Benin and Fifadji (where mosquitoes are pyrethroid resistant) in southern Benin, 2008. Error bars indicate 95% CIs.

Mentions: Mosquito mortality rates in the exit traps at the northern site (susceptible mosquitoes) were 8% before insecticide treatment of the nets and 70% after treatment. Mosquito mortality rates at the sites where they are pyrethroid resistant were similar before and after treatment of the nets and did not exceed 12% (Figure).


Loss of household protection from use of insecticide-treated nets against pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes, benin.

Asidi A, N'Guessan R, Akogbeto M, Curtis C, Rowland M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Death rates of Anopheles gambiae s.l. mosquitoes collected in exit traps at Mallanville (where mosquitoes are pyrethroid susceptible) in northern Benin and Fifadji (where mosquitoes are pyrethroid resistant) in southern Benin, 2008. Error bars indicate 95% CIs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376816&req=5

Figure 1: Death rates of Anopheles gambiae s.l. mosquitoes collected in exit traps at Mallanville (where mosquitoes are pyrethroid susceptible) in northern Benin and Fifadji (where mosquitoes are pyrethroid resistant) in southern Benin, 2008. Error bars indicate 95% CIs.
Mentions: Mosquito mortality rates in the exit traps at the northern site (susceptible mosquitoes) were 8% before insecticide treatment of the nets and 70% after treatment. Mosquito mortality rates at the sites where they are pyrethroid resistant were similar before and after treatment of the nets and did not exceed 12% (Figure).

Bottom Line: By contrast, sleeping under an ITN in the location with susceptible mosquitoes decreased the odds of biting by 66%.ITNs provide little or no protection once the mosquitoes become resistant and the netting acquires holes.Resistance seriously threatens malaria control strategies based on ITN.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Pyrethroid resistance is becoming widespread in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, coinciding with expanded use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) throughout Africa. To investigate whether nets in use are still protective, we conducted household trials in northern and southern Benin, where An. gambiae mosquitoes are susceptible and resistant, respectively, to pyrethroids. Rooms were fitted with window traps and monitored for mosquito biting and survival rates before and after the nets were treated with pyrethroid. Sleeping under an ITN in the location with resistant mosquitoes was no more protective than sleeping under an untreated net, regardless of its physical condition. By contrast, sleeping under an ITN in the location with susceptible mosquitoes decreased the odds of biting by 66%. ITNs provide little or no protection once the mosquitoes become resistant and the netting acquires holes. Resistance seriously threatens malaria control strategies based on ITN.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus