Limits...
Costing framework for International Health Regulations (2005).

Katz R, Haté V, Kornblet S, Fischer JE - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: Many countries have not yet developed these capacities, and poor understanding of the associated costs have created a barrier to effectively marshaling assistance.To help national and international decision makers understand the inputs and associated costs of implementing the IHR (2005), we developed an IHR implementation strategy to serve as a framework for making preliminary estimates of fixed and operating costs associated with developing and sustaining IHR core capacities across an entire public health system.This tool lays the groundwork for modeling the costs of strengthening public health systems from the central to the peripheral level of an integrated health system, a key step in helping national health authorities define necessary actions and investments required for IHR compliance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: George Washington University, Washington, DC 20006, USA. rlkatz@gwu.edu

ABSTRACT
The revised International Health Regulations (IHR [2005]) conferred new responsibilities on member states of the World Health Organization, requiring them to develop core capacities to detect, assess, report, and respond to public health emergencies. Many countries have not yet developed these capacities, and poor understanding of the associated costs have created a barrier to effectively marshaling assistance. To help national and international decision makers understand the inputs and associated costs of implementing the IHR (2005), we developed an IHR implementation strategy to serve as a framework for making preliminary estimates of fixed and operating costs associated with developing and sustaining IHR core capacities across an entire public health system. This tool lays the groundwork for modeling the costs of strengthening public health systems from the central to the peripheral level of an integrated health system, a key step in helping national health authorities define necessary actions and investments required for IHR compliance.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Inputs for Core Capacity 3 (Surveillance). IHR, International Health Regulations; ICT, information and communications technologies; WHO, World Health Organization; PoE, points of entry; PHEIC, public health emergency of international concern.
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Figure 2: Inputs for Core Capacity 3 (Surveillance). IHR, International Health Regulations; ICT, information and communications technologies; WHO, World Health Organization; PoE, points of entry; PHEIC, public health emergency of international concern.

Mentions: The IHR Monitoring Framework specifies that this core capacity encompasses indicator-based surveillance (the routine reporting of diseases or syndromes that meet specific case definitions) and event-based surveillance (the rapid detection and reporting of unusual or unexpected disease patterns, deaths, and exposure risks) (Figure 2; Technical Appendix Table 2). All case-study countries conduct national indicator-based surveillance for priority diseases and have developed strategies for combining routine surveillance data with reports from other sources to provide early warning of emerging public health events. The resources for detecting, reporting, and managing cases of priority diseases and unusual events overlap substantially in the Country X template, particularly at the community level.


Costing framework for International Health Regulations (2005).

Katz R, Haté V, Kornblet S, Fischer JE - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Inputs for Core Capacity 3 (Surveillance). IHR, International Health Regulations; ICT, information and communications technologies; WHO, World Health Organization; PoE, points of entry; PHEIC, public health emergency of international concern.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376815&req=5

Figure 2: Inputs for Core Capacity 3 (Surveillance). IHR, International Health Regulations; ICT, information and communications technologies; WHO, World Health Organization; PoE, points of entry; PHEIC, public health emergency of international concern.
Mentions: The IHR Monitoring Framework specifies that this core capacity encompasses indicator-based surveillance (the routine reporting of diseases or syndromes that meet specific case definitions) and event-based surveillance (the rapid detection and reporting of unusual or unexpected disease patterns, deaths, and exposure risks) (Figure 2; Technical Appendix Table 2). All case-study countries conduct national indicator-based surveillance for priority diseases and have developed strategies for combining routine surveillance data with reports from other sources to provide early warning of emerging public health events. The resources for detecting, reporting, and managing cases of priority diseases and unusual events overlap substantially in the Country X template, particularly at the community level.

Bottom Line: Many countries have not yet developed these capacities, and poor understanding of the associated costs have created a barrier to effectively marshaling assistance.To help national and international decision makers understand the inputs and associated costs of implementing the IHR (2005), we developed an IHR implementation strategy to serve as a framework for making preliminary estimates of fixed and operating costs associated with developing and sustaining IHR core capacities across an entire public health system.This tool lays the groundwork for modeling the costs of strengthening public health systems from the central to the peripheral level of an integrated health system, a key step in helping national health authorities define necessary actions and investments required for IHR compliance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: George Washington University, Washington, DC 20006, USA. rlkatz@gwu.edu

ABSTRACT
The revised International Health Regulations (IHR [2005]) conferred new responsibilities on member states of the World Health Organization, requiring them to develop core capacities to detect, assess, report, and respond to public health emergencies. Many countries have not yet developed these capacities, and poor understanding of the associated costs have created a barrier to effectively marshaling assistance. To help national and international decision makers understand the inputs and associated costs of implementing the IHR (2005), we developed an IHR implementation strategy to serve as a framework for making preliminary estimates of fixed and operating costs associated with developing and sustaining IHR core capacities across an entire public health system. This tool lays the groundwork for modeling the costs of strengthening public health systems from the central to the peripheral level of an integrated health system, a key step in helping national health authorities define necessary actions and investments required for IHR compliance.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus