Limits...
Role of birds in dispersal of etiologic agents of tick-borne zoonoses, Spain, 2009.

Palomar AM, Santibáñez P, Mazuelas D, Roncero L, Santibáñez S, Portillo A, Oteo JA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: We amplified gene sequences from Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia garinii, B. valaisiana, B. turdi, Rickettsia monacensis, R. helvetica, R. sibirica sibirica, and Rickettsia spp. (including Candidatus Rickettsia vini) in ticks removed from birds in Spain.The findings support the role of passerine birds as possible dispersers of these tick-borne pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital San Pedro–Centro de Investigación Biomédica de La Rioja, Logroño, Spain.

ABSTRACT
We amplified gene sequences from Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia garinii, B. valaisiana, B. turdi, Rickettsia monacensis, R. helvetica, R. sibirica sibirica, and Rickettsia spp. (including Candidatus Rickettsia vini) in ticks removed from birds in Spain. The findings support the role of passerine birds as possible dispersers of these tick-borne pathogens.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The phylogenetic position of Candidatus Rickettsia vini based on the ompA nucleotide sequences in a study of the role of birds in dispersal of etiologic agents of tick-borne zoonoses, Spain, 2009. The evolutionary history was inferred by using the neighbor-joining method. The optimal tree with the sum of branch length = 1.09961140 is shown. The percentage of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered in the bootstrap test (1,000 replicates) is shown next to the branches. The tree is drawn to scale, with branch lengths in the same units as those of the evolutionary distances used to infer the phylogenetic tree. The evolutionary distances were computed by using the Kimura 2-parameter method and are in the units of the number of base substitutions per site. Codon positions included were 1st+2nd+3rd+Noncoding. All positions containing gaps and missing data were eliminated from the dataset. A total of 563 positions were in the final dataset. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted in MEGA4 (16 in Technical Appendix).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376802&req=5

Figure 1: The phylogenetic position of Candidatus Rickettsia vini based on the ompA nucleotide sequences in a study of the role of birds in dispersal of etiologic agents of tick-borne zoonoses, Spain, 2009. The evolutionary history was inferred by using the neighbor-joining method. The optimal tree with the sum of branch length = 1.09961140 is shown. The percentage of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered in the bootstrap test (1,000 replicates) is shown next to the branches. The tree is drawn to scale, with branch lengths in the same units as those of the evolutionary distances used to infer the phylogenetic tree. The evolutionary distances were computed by using the Kimura 2-parameter method and are in the units of the number of base substitutions per site. Codon positions included were 1st+2nd+3rd+Noncoding. All positions containing gaps and missing data were eliminated from the dataset. A total of 563 positions were in the final dataset. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted in MEGA4 (16 in Technical Appendix).

Mentions: A. phagocytophilum was detected only in 1 larva of an I. ricinus tick (0.5%). Twenty-nine (13.1%) samples tested positive for B. burgdorferi s.l. The most prevalent genospecies was B. garinii (n = 19), which was detected in I. ricinus (n = 16), H. punctata (n = 1), I. frontalis (n = 1), and Ixodes sp. (n = 1) ticks. B. valaisiana was amplified in 9 samples (8 I. ricinus and 1 Ixodes sp. ticks). B. turdi was found in 1 I. frontalis tick. Rickettsia infection was detected in 39 (17.6%) ticks. R. monacensis (n = 1), R. helvetica (n = 1), R. sibirica sibirica (n = 1), and Rickettsia spp. (n = 9) were detected in 12 I. ricinus ticks. Furthermore, according to gltA, ompA, and ompB sequence analysis, a possible new Rickettsia sp. was found in 25 I. arboricola ticks and 2 I. ricinus ticks. For these 27 samples, highest identities with R. heilongjiangensis (97.1%) and R. japonica (99.1%) were found for ompA (GenBank accession no. JF758828) and ompB (GenBank accession no. JF758826) nucleotide sequences, respectively, whereas gltA nucleotide sequences were identical to those from both Rickettsia spp. According to multilocus sequence typing (data not shown) and genetic criteria agreed on by experts, a Candidatus status could be assigned. We named it Candidatus Rickettsia vini (17 in Technical Appendix) (Table 2). The phylogenetic tree based on ompA gene shows the nearest relationships among Rickettsia spp. (Figure).


Role of birds in dispersal of etiologic agents of tick-borne zoonoses, Spain, 2009.

Palomar AM, Santibáñez P, Mazuelas D, Roncero L, Santibáñez S, Portillo A, Oteo JA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

The phylogenetic position of Candidatus Rickettsia vini based on the ompA nucleotide sequences in a study of the role of birds in dispersal of etiologic agents of tick-borne zoonoses, Spain, 2009. The evolutionary history was inferred by using the neighbor-joining method. The optimal tree with the sum of branch length = 1.09961140 is shown. The percentage of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered in the bootstrap test (1,000 replicates) is shown next to the branches. The tree is drawn to scale, with branch lengths in the same units as those of the evolutionary distances used to infer the phylogenetic tree. The evolutionary distances were computed by using the Kimura 2-parameter method and are in the units of the number of base substitutions per site. Codon positions included were 1st+2nd+3rd+Noncoding. All positions containing gaps and missing data were eliminated from the dataset. A total of 563 positions were in the final dataset. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted in MEGA4 (16 in Technical Appendix).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376802&req=5

Figure 1: The phylogenetic position of Candidatus Rickettsia vini based on the ompA nucleotide sequences in a study of the role of birds in dispersal of etiologic agents of tick-borne zoonoses, Spain, 2009. The evolutionary history was inferred by using the neighbor-joining method. The optimal tree with the sum of branch length = 1.09961140 is shown. The percentage of replicate trees in which the associated taxa clustered in the bootstrap test (1,000 replicates) is shown next to the branches. The tree is drawn to scale, with branch lengths in the same units as those of the evolutionary distances used to infer the phylogenetic tree. The evolutionary distances were computed by using the Kimura 2-parameter method and are in the units of the number of base substitutions per site. Codon positions included were 1st+2nd+3rd+Noncoding. All positions containing gaps and missing data were eliminated from the dataset. A total of 563 positions were in the final dataset. Phylogenetic analyses were conducted in MEGA4 (16 in Technical Appendix).
Mentions: A. phagocytophilum was detected only in 1 larva of an I. ricinus tick (0.5%). Twenty-nine (13.1%) samples tested positive for B. burgdorferi s.l. The most prevalent genospecies was B. garinii (n = 19), which was detected in I. ricinus (n = 16), H. punctata (n = 1), I. frontalis (n = 1), and Ixodes sp. (n = 1) ticks. B. valaisiana was amplified in 9 samples (8 I. ricinus and 1 Ixodes sp. ticks). B. turdi was found in 1 I. frontalis tick. Rickettsia infection was detected in 39 (17.6%) ticks. R. monacensis (n = 1), R. helvetica (n = 1), R. sibirica sibirica (n = 1), and Rickettsia spp. (n = 9) were detected in 12 I. ricinus ticks. Furthermore, according to gltA, ompA, and ompB sequence analysis, a possible new Rickettsia sp. was found in 25 I. arboricola ticks and 2 I. ricinus ticks. For these 27 samples, highest identities with R. heilongjiangensis (97.1%) and R. japonica (99.1%) were found for ompA (GenBank accession no. JF758828) and ompB (GenBank accession no. JF758826) nucleotide sequences, respectively, whereas gltA nucleotide sequences were identical to those from both Rickettsia spp. According to multilocus sequence typing (data not shown) and genetic criteria agreed on by experts, a Candidatus status could be assigned. We named it Candidatus Rickettsia vini (17 in Technical Appendix) (Table 2). The phylogenetic tree based on ompA gene shows the nearest relationships among Rickettsia spp. (Figure).

Bottom Line: We amplified gene sequences from Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia garinii, B. valaisiana, B. turdi, Rickettsia monacensis, R. helvetica, R. sibirica sibirica, and Rickettsia spp. (including Candidatus Rickettsia vini) in ticks removed from birds in Spain.The findings support the role of passerine birds as possible dispersers of these tick-borne pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital San Pedro–Centro de Investigación Biomédica de La Rioja, Logroño, Spain.

ABSTRACT
We amplified gene sequences from Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia garinii, B. valaisiana, B. turdi, Rickettsia monacensis, R. helvetica, R. sibirica sibirica, and Rickettsia spp. (including Candidatus Rickettsia vini) in ticks removed from birds in Spain. The findings support the role of passerine birds as possible dispersers of these tick-borne pathogens.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus