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Probable transmission of coxsackie B3 virus from human to chimpanzee, Denmark.

Nielsen SC, Mourier T, Baandrup U, Søland TM, Bertelsen MF, Gilbert MT, Nielsen LP - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: In 2010, a chimpanzee died at Copenhagen Zoo following an outbreak of respiratory disease among chimpanzees in the zoo.Identification of coxsackie B3 virus, a common human pathogen, as the causative agent, and its severe manifestation, raise questions about pathogenicity and transmissibility among humans and other primates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. s.abelnielsen@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
In 2010, a chimpanzee died at Copenhagen Zoo following an outbreak of respiratory disease among chimpanzees in the zoo. Identification of coxsackie B3 virus, a common human pathogen, as the causative agent, and its severe manifestation, raise questions about pathogenicity and transmissibility among humans and other primates.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Postmortem tissue sections from chimpanzee with coxsackie virus B infection, Denmark. A) Myocardial section showing artifacts of freezing and a diffuse lymphocytic infiltration. Scale bar = 80 µm. B) Myocytic degeneration (arrows) is evident. Scale bar = 40 µm. C) CD3 marker reaction showing T lymphocytes. Scale bar = 40 µm.
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Figure 1: Postmortem tissue sections from chimpanzee with coxsackie virus B infection, Denmark. A) Myocardial section showing artifacts of freezing and a diffuse lymphocytic infiltration. Scale bar = 80 µm. B) Myocytic degeneration (arrows) is evident. Scale bar = 40 µm. C) CD3 marker reaction showing T lymphocytes. Scale bar = 40 µm.

Mentions: Postmortem examination revealed marked hepatic congestion and mild congestion of the small intestine. The heart was flaccid, and pale streaks were observed in the myocardium. On histographic examination, the lungs showed mild mononuclear interstitial infiltration, and there was marked infiltration in the myocardium consisting mainly of CD3 positive T lymphocytes mixed with a few granulocytes. In addition, multifocal severe myonecrosis was observed; cardiac myocytes were completely engulfed by inflammatory cells (Figure 1).


Probable transmission of coxsackie B3 virus from human to chimpanzee, Denmark.

Nielsen SC, Mourier T, Baandrup U, Søland TM, Bertelsen MF, Gilbert MT, Nielsen LP - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Postmortem tissue sections from chimpanzee with coxsackie virus B infection, Denmark. A) Myocardial section showing artifacts of freezing and a diffuse lymphocytic infiltration. Scale bar = 80 µm. B) Myocytic degeneration (arrows) is evident. Scale bar = 40 µm. C) CD3 marker reaction showing T lymphocytes. Scale bar = 40 µm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376799&req=5

Figure 1: Postmortem tissue sections from chimpanzee with coxsackie virus B infection, Denmark. A) Myocardial section showing artifacts of freezing and a diffuse lymphocytic infiltration. Scale bar = 80 µm. B) Myocytic degeneration (arrows) is evident. Scale bar = 40 µm. C) CD3 marker reaction showing T lymphocytes. Scale bar = 40 µm.
Mentions: Postmortem examination revealed marked hepatic congestion and mild congestion of the small intestine. The heart was flaccid, and pale streaks were observed in the myocardium. On histographic examination, the lungs showed mild mononuclear interstitial infiltration, and there was marked infiltration in the myocardium consisting mainly of CD3 positive T lymphocytes mixed with a few granulocytes. In addition, multifocal severe myonecrosis was observed; cardiac myocytes were completely engulfed by inflammatory cells (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: In 2010, a chimpanzee died at Copenhagen Zoo following an outbreak of respiratory disease among chimpanzees in the zoo.Identification of coxsackie B3 virus, a common human pathogen, as the causative agent, and its severe manifestation, raise questions about pathogenicity and transmissibility among humans and other primates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. s.abelnielsen@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
In 2010, a chimpanzee died at Copenhagen Zoo following an outbreak of respiratory disease among chimpanzees in the zoo. Identification of coxsackie B3 virus, a common human pathogen, as the causative agent, and its severe manifestation, raise questions about pathogenicity and transmissibility among humans and other primates.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus