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Adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques, United States.

Roy S, Sandhu A, Medina A, Clawson DS, Wilson JM - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: To assess the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs, we tested fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques housed in 5 primate facilities in the United States and cultured 23 SAdV isolates.The sequence of SAdV-18 was closely related to that of human adenovirus F across the whole genome, and the new isolates were found to harbor 2 fiber genes similar to those of human adenovirus (HAdV) strains HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, which can cause infectious diarrhea.The high prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques and the similarity of the isolates to human strains indicates the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

ABSTRACT
Adenoviruses can cause infectious diarrheal disease or respiratory infections in humans; 2 recent reports have indicated probable human infection with simian adenoviruses (SAdVs). To assess the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs, we tested fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques housed in 5 primate facilities in the United States and cultured 23 SAdV isolates. Of these, 9 were purified and completely sequenced; 3 SAdV samples from the American Type Culture Collection (SAdV-6, SAdV-18, and SAdV-20) were also completely sequenced. The sequence of SAdV-18 was closely related to that of human adenovirus F across the whole genome, and the new isolates were found to harbor 2 fiber genes similar to those of human adenovirus (HAdV) strains HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, which can cause infectious diarrhea. The high prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques and the similarity of the isolates to human strains indicates the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs.

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Neighbor-joining alignment of amino acid sequences for the fiber knob domains of macaque adenoviruses (5 representative members of simian adenovirus type B [SAdV-B]) and representative members from each human adenovirus (HAdV) species, with bootstrapping at 1,000 replicates. Alignment was performed by using CLC Bio version 6.1 software (CLC Bio, Aarhus, Denmark). Bootstrap values (percentages) are indicated on the nodes. SAdV-1 and SAdV-7 have been grouped together with HAdV-52 into HAdV-G; the other macaque adenoviruses (except for SAdV-18, SAdV-20, and the titi monkey adenovirus) have been grouped into SAdV-A and SAdV-B. Scale bar indicates number of substitutions per site.
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Figure 4: Neighbor-joining alignment of amino acid sequences for the fiber knob domains of macaque adenoviruses (5 representative members of simian adenovirus type B [SAdV-B]) and representative members from each human adenovirus (HAdV) species, with bootstrapping at 1,000 replicates. Alignment was performed by using CLC Bio version 6.1 software (CLC Bio, Aarhus, Denmark). Bootstrap values (percentages) are indicated on the nodes. SAdV-1 and SAdV-7 have been grouped together with HAdV-52 into HAdV-G; the other macaque adenoviruses (except for SAdV-18, SAdV-20, and the titi monkey adenovirus) have been grouped into SAdV-A and SAdV-B. Scale bar indicates number of substitutions per site.

Mentions: The fiber knob domain mediates the initial virus-cell interaction by binding to a cellular receptor. A phylogenetic tree generated on the basis of an alignment of the fiber knob domains of macaque and human adenoviruses is shown in Figure 4. It is evident that the knob domains of the long fiber (fiber 2) of the human adenoviruses belonging to HAdV-F are more similar to those of SAdV-18 than to any other human adenovirus. The SAdV-18 fiber sequence is very similar to the HAdV-F long fiber throughout its length, and the sequence similarity between the knob domains of HAdV-40 and those of SAdV-18 is >90% (Figure 5. HAdV-F species (HAdV-40, HAdV-41, and serologically related isolates) are known to be enteric adenoviruses that frequently cause diarrhea in infants. The HAdV-F long fiber knob can bind the cellular receptor CAR (22), and the SAdV-18 fiber knob would probably be able to do so as well. Notably, the shaft domain of SAdV-18 is 391 residues long (the longest such domain of any primate adenovirus sequenced) and harbors as many as 25 iterations of the β-spiral repeat motif (Figure 5). However, unlike HAdV-F, SAdV-18 contains a single fiber gene.


Adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques, United States.

Roy S, Sandhu A, Medina A, Clawson DS, Wilson JM - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Neighbor-joining alignment of amino acid sequences for the fiber knob domains of macaque adenoviruses (5 representative members of simian adenovirus type B [SAdV-B]) and representative members from each human adenovirus (HAdV) species, with bootstrapping at 1,000 replicates. Alignment was performed by using CLC Bio version 6.1 software (CLC Bio, Aarhus, Denmark). Bootstrap values (percentages) are indicated on the nodes. SAdV-1 and SAdV-7 have been grouped together with HAdV-52 into HAdV-G; the other macaque adenoviruses (except for SAdV-18, SAdV-20, and the titi monkey adenovirus) have been grouped into SAdV-A and SAdV-B. Scale bar indicates number of substitutions per site.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376797&req=5

Figure 4: Neighbor-joining alignment of amino acid sequences for the fiber knob domains of macaque adenoviruses (5 representative members of simian adenovirus type B [SAdV-B]) and representative members from each human adenovirus (HAdV) species, with bootstrapping at 1,000 replicates. Alignment was performed by using CLC Bio version 6.1 software (CLC Bio, Aarhus, Denmark). Bootstrap values (percentages) are indicated on the nodes. SAdV-1 and SAdV-7 have been grouped together with HAdV-52 into HAdV-G; the other macaque adenoviruses (except for SAdV-18, SAdV-20, and the titi monkey adenovirus) have been grouped into SAdV-A and SAdV-B. Scale bar indicates number of substitutions per site.
Mentions: The fiber knob domain mediates the initial virus-cell interaction by binding to a cellular receptor. A phylogenetic tree generated on the basis of an alignment of the fiber knob domains of macaque and human adenoviruses is shown in Figure 4. It is evident that the knob domains of the long fiber (fiber 2) of the human adenoviruses belonging to HAdV-F are more similar to those of SAdV-18 than to any other human adenovirus. The SAdV-18 fiber sequence is very similar to the HAdV-F long fiber throughout its length, and the sequence similarity between the knob domains of HAdV-40 and those of SAdV-18 is >90% (Figure 5. HAdV-F species (HAdV-40, HAdV-41, and serologically related isolates) are known to be enteric adenoviruses that frequently cause diarrhea in infants. The HAdV-F long fiber knob can bind the cellular receptor CAR (22), and the SAdV-18 fiber knob would probably be able to do so as well. Notably, the shaft domain of SAdV-18 is 391 residues long (the longest such domain of any primate adenovirus sequenced) and harbors as many as 25 iterations of the β-spiral repeat motif (Figure 5). However, unlike HAdV-F, SAdV-18 contains a single fiber gene.

Bottom Line: To assess the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs, we tested fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques housed in 5 primate facilities in the United States and cultured 23 SAdV isolates.The sequence of SAdV-18 was closely related to that of human adenovirus F across the whole genome, and the new isolates were found to harbor 2 fiber genes similar to those of human adenovirus (HAdV) strains HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, which can cause infectious diarrhea.The high prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques and the similarity of the isolates to human strains indicates the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

ABSTRACT
Adenoviruses can cause infectious diarrheal disease or respiratory infections in humans; 2 recent reports have indicated probable human infection with simian adenoviruses (SAdVs). To assess the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs, we tested fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques housed in 5 primate facilities in the United States and cultured 23 SAdV isolates. Of these, 9 were purified and completely sequenced; 3 SAdV samples from the American Type Culture Collection (SAdV-6, SAdV-18, and SAdV-20) were also completely sequenced. The sequence of SAdV-18 was closely related to that of human adenovirus F across the whole genome, and the new isolates were found to harbor 2 fiber genes similar to those of human adenovirus (HAdV) strains HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, which can cause infectious diarrhea. The high prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques and the similarity of the isolates to human strains indicates the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus