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Adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques, United States.

Roy S, Sandhu A, Medina A, Clawson DS, Wilson JM - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: To assess the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs, we tested fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques housed in 5 primate facilities in the United States and cultured 23 SAdV isolates.The sequence of SAdV-18 was closely related to that of human adenovirus F across the whole genome, and the new isolates were found to harbor 2 fiber genes similar to those of human adenovirus (HAdV) strains HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, which can cause infectious diarrhea.The high prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques and the similarity of the isolates to human strains indicates the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

ABSTRACT
Adenoviruses can cause infectious diarrheal disease or respiratory infections in humans; 2 recent reports have indicated probable human infection with simian adenoviruses (SAdVs). To assess the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs, we tested fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques housed in 5 primate facilities in the United States and cultured 23 SAdV isolates. Of these, 9 were purified and completely sequenced; 3 SAdV samples from the American Type Culture Collection (SAdV-6, SAdV-18, and SAdV-20) were also completely sequenced. The sequence of SAdV-18 was closely related to that of human adenovirus F across the whole genome, and the new isolates were found to harbor 2 fiber genes similar to those of human adenovirus (HAdV) strains HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, which can cause infectious diarrhea. The high prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques and the similarity of the isolates to human strains indicates the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs.

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Phylogenetic trees of the genes coding for A) DNA polymerase, B) E4 34K, C) E1a, and D) hexons of macaque adenoviruses identified in study of prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from rhesus macaques, United States. Members of the human adenovirus (HAdV) species HAdV-A (HAdV-12), HAdV-G, and HAdV-F that are thought to have the closest phylogenetic proximity to macaque adenoviruses are included for comparison. Branch support values are indicated. Simian adenoviruses (SAdV) SAdV-1 and SAdV-7 have been grouped together with HAdV-52 into HAdV-G; the other macaque adenoviruses (except for SAdV-18, SAdV-20, and the titi monkey adenovirus) have been grouped into SAdV-A and SAdV-B. SAdV-18 is seen to be closely related to HAdV-F (HAdV-40 and HAdV-41) in all the trees. Scale bars indicate number of substitutions per site.
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Figure 1: Phylogenetic trees of the genes coding for A) DNA polymerase, B) E4 34K, C) E1a, and D) hexons of macaque adenoviruses identified in study of prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from rhesus macaques, United States. Members of the human adenovirus (HAdV) species HAdV-A (HAdV-12), HAdV-G, and HAdV-F that are thought to have the closest phylogenetic proximity to macaque adenoviruses are included for comparison. Branch support values are indicated. Simian adenoviruses (SAdV) SAdV-1 and SAdV-7 have been grouped together with HAdV-52 into HAdV-G; the other macaque adenoviruses (except for SAdV-18, SAdV-20, and the titi monkey adenovirus) have been grouped into SAdV-A and SAdV-B. SAdV-18 is seen to be closely related to HAdV-F (HAdV-40 and HAdV-41) in all the trees. Scale bars indicate number of substitutions per site.

Mentions: Phylogenetic analyses of the nucleotide sequences that encode genes of several of the adenoviral proteins showed the sequences were generally concordant with one another. As examples, the phylogenetic trees for the sequences encoding E1a, DNA polymerase, hexon, and E4 34K are shown in Figure 1. The sequences have been compared with each other and with previously sequenced macaque adenoviruses SAdV-1, SAdV-3, SAdV-7, SAdV-48, SAdV-49, SAdV-50, titi monkey adenovirus, and cynomolgus adenovirus 1 (8,9,14–17). The human isolate HAdV-52 (7), which is known to be closely related to SAdV-1 and SAdV-7, was also included in the analyses. Macaque adenoviruses form a distinct clade when compared with human or ape adenoviruses (9). However, HADV-F (HAdV-40 and HAdV-41) and HAdV-A (HAdV-12) are also included in the analyses because these species are the most closely related to macaque adenoviruses (14,15).


Adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques, United States.

Roy S, Sandhu A, Medina A, Clawson DS, Wilson JM - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Phylogenetic trees of the genes coding for A) DNA polymerase, B) E4 34K, C) E1a, and D) hexons of macaque adenoviruses identified in study of prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from rhesus macaques, United States. Members of the human adenovirus (HAdV) species HAdV-A (HAdV-12), HAdV-G, and HAdV-F that are thought to have the closest phylogenetic proximity to macaque adenoviruses are included for comparison. Branch support values are indicated. Simian adenoviruses (SAdV) SAdV-1 and SAdV-7 have been grouped together with HAdV-52 into HAdV-G; the other macaque adenoviruses (except for SAdV-18, SAdV-20, and the titi monkey adenovirus) have been grouped into SAdV-A and SAdV-B. SAdV-18 is seen to be closely related to HAdV-F (HAdV-40 and HAdV-41) in all the trees. Scale bars indicate number of substitutions per site.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376797&req=5

Figure 1: Phylogenetic trees of the genes coding for A) DNA polymerase, B) E4 34K, C) E1a, and D) hexons of macaque adenoviruses identified in study of prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from rhesus macaques, United States. Members of the human adenovirus (HAdV) species HAdV-A (HAdV-12), HAdV-G, and HAdV-F that are thought to have the closest phylogenetic proximity to macaque adenoviruses are included for comparison. Branch support values are indicated. Simian adenoviruses (SAdV) SAdV-1 and SAdV-7 have been grouped together with HAdV-52 into HAdV-G; the other macaque adenoviruses (except for SAdV-18, SAdV-20, and the titi monkey adenovirus) have been grouped into SAdV-A and SAdV-B. SAdV-18 is seen to be closely related to HAdV-F (HAdV-40 and HAdV-41) in all the trees. Scale bars indicate number of substitutions per site.
Mentions: Phylogenetic analyses of the nucleotide sequences that encode genes of several of the adenoviral proteins showed the sequences were generally concordant with one another. As examples, the phylogenetic trees for the sequences encoding E1a, DNA polymerase, hexon, and E4 34K are shown in Figure 1. The sequences have been compared with each other and with previously sequenced macaque adenoviruses SAdV-1, SAdV-3, SAdV-7, SAdV-48, SAdV-49, SAdV-50, titi monkey adenovirus, and cynomolgus adenovirus 1 (8,9,14–17). The human isolate HAdV-52 (7), which is known to be closely related to SAdV-1 and SAdV-7, was also included in the analyses. Macaque adenoviruses form a distinct clade when compared with human or ape adenoviruses (9). However, HADV-F (HAdV-40 and HAdV-41) and HAdV-A (HAdV-12) are also included in the analyses because these species are the most closely related to macaque adenoviruses (14,15).

Bottom Line: To assess the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs, we tested fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques housed in 5 primate facilities in the United States and cultured 23 SAdV isolates.The sequence of SAdV-18 was closely related to that of human adenovirus F across the whole genome, and the new isolates were found to harbor 2 fiber genes similar to those of human adenovirus (HAdV) strains HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, which can cause infectious diarrhea.The high prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques and the similarity of the isolates to human strains indicates the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Transfusion Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

ABSTRACT
Adenoviruses can cause infectious diarrheal disease or respiratory infections in humans; 2 recent reports have indicated probable human infection with simian adenoviruses (SAdVs). To assess the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs, we tested fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques housed in 5 primate facilities in the United States and cultured 23 SAdV isolates. Of these, 9 were purified and completely sequenced; 3 SAdV samples from the American Type Culture Collection (SAdV-6, SAdV-18, and SAdV-20) were also completely sequenced. The sequence of SAdV-18 was closely related to that of human adenovirus F across the whole genome, and the new isolates were found to harbor 2 fiber genes similar to those of human adenovirus (HAdV) strains HAdV-40 and HAdV-41, which can cause infectious diarrhea. The high prevalence of adenoviruses in fecal samples from asymptomatic rhesus macaques and the similarity of the isolates to human strains indicates the possibility of animal-to-human transmission of SAdVs.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus