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Salmonellosis outbreak traced to playground sand, Australia, 2007-2009.

Staff M, Musto J, Hogg G, Janssen M, Rose K - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: A community outbreak of gastroenteritis in Australia during 2007-2009 was caused by ingestion of playground sand contaminated with Salmonella enterica Paratyphi B, variant Java.The bacterium was also isolated from local wildlife.Findings support consideration of nonfood sources during salmonellosis outbreak investigations and indicate transmission through the animal-human interface.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New South Wales Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
A community outbreak of gastroenteritis in Australia during 2007-2009 was caused by ingestion of playground sand contaminated with Salmonella enterica Paratyphi B, variant Java. The bacterium was also isolated from local wildlife. Findings support consideration of nonfood sources during salmonellosis outbreak investigations and indicate transmission through the animal-human interface.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta). Photograph courtesy of Taronga Zoo, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 2: Long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta). Photograph courtesy of Taronga Zoo, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Mentions: To better characterize the distribution of the bacterium in the local ecosystems, we collected fecal and cloacal samples from 261 free-ranging animals of various species (Table). Thirty-four isolates of S. enterica var. Java were identified: most were from a marsupial species native to the local area, the long-nosed bandicoot, Perameles nasuta (Figure 2). Phage and MLVA types were indistinguishable from human and environmental isolates. The Australian Registry of Wildlife Health had no recorded evidence of disease associated with the isolation of S. enterica var. Java from long-nosed bandicoots (K. Rose, Taronga Conservation Society Australia, pers. comm.).


Salmonellosis outbreak traced to playground sand, Australia, 2007-2009.

Staff M, Musto J, Hogg G, Janssen M, Rose K - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta). Photograph courtesy of Taronga Zoo, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376791&req=5

Figure 2: Long-nosed bandicoot (Perameles nasuta). Photograph courtesy of Taronga Zoo, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Mentions: To better characterize the distribution of the bacterium in the local ecosystems, we collected fecal and cloacal samples from 261 free-ranging animals of various species (Table). Thirty-four isolates of S. enterica var. Java were identified: most were from a marsupial species native to the local area, the long-nosed bandicoot, Perameles nasuta (Figure 2). Phage and MLVA types were indistinguishable from human and environmental isolates. The Australian Registry of Wildlife Health had no recorded evidence of disease associated with the isolation of S. enterica var. Java from long-nosed bandicoots (K. Rose, Taronga Conservation Society Australia, pers. comm.).

Bottom Line: A community outbreak of gastroenteritis in Australia during 2007-2009 was caused by ingestion of playground sand contaminated with Salmonella enterica Paratyphi B, variant Java.The bacterium was also isolated from local wildlife.Findings support consideration of nonfood sources during salmonellosis outbreak investigations and indicate transmission through the animal-human interface.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New South Wales Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
A community outbreak of gastroenteritis in Australia during 2007-2009 was caused by ingestion of playground sand contaminated with Salmonella enterica Paratyphi B, variant Java. The bacterium was also isolated from local wildlife. Findings support consideration of nonfood sources during salmonellosis outbreak investigations and indicate transmission through the animal-human interface.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus