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Salmonellosis outbreak traced to playground sand, Australia, 2007-2009.

Staff M, Musto J, Hogg G, Janssen M, Rose K - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: A community outbreak of gastroenteritis in Australia during 2007-2009 was caused by ingestion of playground sand contaminated with Salmonella enterica Paratyphi B, variant Java.The bacterium was also isolated from local wildlife.Findings support consideration of nonfood sources during salmonellosis outbreak investigations and indicate transmission through the animal-human interface.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New South Wales Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
A community outbreak of gastroenteritis in Australia during 2007-2009 was caused by ingestion of playground sand contaminated with Salmonella enterica Paratyphi B, variant Java. The bacterium was also isolated from local wildlife. Findings support consideration of nonfood sources during salmonellosis outbreak investigations and indicate transmission through the animal-human interface.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of cases of Salmonella enterica variant Java infection and month of onset in children playing in sandboxes, Australia, 2007–2009.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Number of cases of Salmonella enterica variant Java infection and month of onset in children playing in sandboxes, Australia, 2007–2009.

Mentions: To confirm the hypothesis that sand from playgrounds contaminated with S. enterica var. Java was the immediate source of the outbreak, we performed an age-matched case–control study of case-patients 1 month to 4 years of age involving 16 case-patients and 32 controls during May 2008. Controls were selected from the registers of 2 local community child-health clinics. Exposure to playgrounds with contaminated sand within 7 days of symptom onset was associated with illness (matched odds ratio 3.7, 95% CI 1.1–12.1). In May 2008, the local authority began closing sandboxes, replacing the sand, and reopening. A substantial reduction in the number of case-patients reported occurred (Figure 1), although new case-patients continued to be reported throughout the study period.


Salmonellosis outbreak traced to playground sand, Australia, 2007-2009.

Staff M, Musto J, Hogg G, Janssen M, Rose K - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Number of cases of Salmonella enterica variant Java infection and month of onset in children playing in sandboxes, Australia, 2007–2009.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376791&req=5

Figure 1: Number of cases of Salmonella enterica variant Java infection and month of onset in children playing in sandboxes, Australia, 2007–2009.
Mentions: To confirm the hypothesis that sand from playgrounds contaminated with S. enterica var. Java was the immediate source of the outbreak, we performed an age-matched case–control study of case-patients 1 month to 4 years of age involving 16 case-patients and 32 controls during May 2008. Controls were selected from the registers of 2 local community child-health clinics. Exposure to playgrounds with contaminated sand within 7 days of symptom onset was associated with illness (matched odds ratio 3.7, 95% CI 1.1–12.1). In May 2008, the local authority began closing sandboxes, replacing the sand, and reopening. A substantial reduction in the number of case-patients reported occurred (Figure 1), although new case-patients continued to be reported throughout the study period.

Bottom Line: A community outbreak of gastroenteritis in Australia during 2007-2009 was caused by ingestion of playground sand contaminated with Salmonella enterica Paratyphi B, variant Java.The bacterium was also isolated from local wildlife.Findings support consideration of nonfood sources during salmonellosis outbreak investigations and indicate transmission through the animal-human interface.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: New South Wales Health, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
A community outbreak of gastroenteritis in Australia during 2007-2009 was caused by ingestion of playground sand contaminated with Salmonella enterica Paratyphi B, variant Java. The bacterium was also isolated from local wildlife. Findings support consideration of nonfood sources during salmonellosis outbreak investigations and indicate transmission through the animal-human interface.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus