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Lessons learned from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic response in Thailand.

Ungchusak K, Sawanpanyalert P, Hanchoworakul W, Sawanpanyalert N, Maloney SA, Brown RC, Birmingham ME, Chusuttiwat S - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: The national response came under intense public scrutiny as the number of confirmed cases and associated deaths increased.The review found that the actions taken were largely appropriate and proportionate to need.However, areas needing improvement were surveillance, laboratory capacity, hospital infection control and surge capacity, coordination and monitoring of guidelines for clinical management and nonpharmaceutical interventions, risk communications, and addressing vulnerabilities of non-Thai displaced and migrant populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bureau of Epidemiology, Department of Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand. kum.ungchusak@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
In 2009, Thailand experienced rapid spread of the pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The national response came under intense public scrutiny as the number of confirmed cases and associated deaths increased. Thus, during July-December 2009, the Ministry of Public Health and the World Health Organization jointly reviewed the response efforts. The review found that the actions taken were largely appropriate and proportionate to need. However, areas needing improvement were surveillance, laboratory capacity, hospital infection control and surge capacity, coordination and monitoring of guidelines for clinical management and nonpharmaceutical interventions, risk communications, and addressing vulnerabilities of non-Thai displaced and migrant populations. The experience in Thailand may be applicable to other countries and settings, and the lessons learned may help strengthen responses to other pandemics or comparable prolonged public health emergencies.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Reported number of influenza cases, laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections, and deaths associated with confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections, Thailand, 2009–2010. ILI, influenza-like illness; OP, outpatient; IP, inpatient.
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Figure 1: Reported number of influenza cases, laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections, and deaths associated with confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections, Thailand, 2009–2010. ILI, influenza-like illness; OP, outpatient; IP, inpatient.

Mentions: National surveillance data indicated that 2 pandemic waves occurred during the initial 12-month outbreak period. The first wave began in May 2009, peaked in July, and subsided in December; the second wave began in January 2010, peaked in early February, and subsided in April. A third pandemic wave occurred during the latter part of 2010. During 2009–2010, a total of 234,050 influenza cases were reported in Thailand. Of these, 47,433 were laboratory-confirmed to be A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections; 347 deaths were associated with the confirmed cases (Figure 1).


Lessons learned from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic response in Thailand.

Ungchusak K, Sawanpanyalert P, Hanchoworakul W, Sawanpanyalert N, Maloney SA, Brown RC, Birmingham ME, Chusuttiwat S - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Reported number of influenza cases, laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections, and deaths associated with confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections, Thailand, 2009–2010. ILI, influenza-like illness; OP, outpatient; IP, inpatient.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376790&req=5

Figure 1: Reported number of influenza cases, laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections, and deaths associated with confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections, Thailand, 2009–2010. ILI, influenza-like illness; OP, outpatient; IP, inpatient.
Mentions: National surveillance data indicated that 2 pandemic waves occurred during the initial 12-month outbreak period. The first wave began in May 2009, peaked in July, and subsided in December; the second wave began in January 2010, peaked in early February, and subsided in April. A third pandemic wave occurred during the latter part of 2010. During 2009–2010, a total of 234,050 influenza cases were reported in Thailand. Of these, 47,433 were laboratory-confirmed to be A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections; 347 deaths were associated with the confirmed cases (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The national response came under intense public scrutiny as the number of confirmed cases and associated deaths increased.The review found that the actions taken were largely appropriate and proportionate to need.However, areas needing improvement were surveillance, laboratory capacity, hospital infection control and surge capacity, coordination and monitoring of guidelines for clinical management and nonpharmaceutical interventions, risk communications, and addressing vulnerabilities of non-Thai displaced and migrant populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bureau of Epidemiology, Department of Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand. kum.ungchusak@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
In 2009, Thailand experienced rapid spread of the pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The national response came under intense public scrutiny as the number of confirmed cases and associated deaths increased. Thus, during July-December 2009, the Ministry of Public Health and the World Health Organization jointly reviewed the response efforts. The review found that the actions taken were largely appropriate and proportionate to need. However, areas needing improvement were surveillance, laboratory capacity, hospital infection control and surge capacity, coordination and monitoring of guidelines for clinical management and nonpharmaceutical interventions, risk communications, and addressing vulnerabilities of non-Thai displaced and migrant populations. The experience in Thailand may be applicable to other countries and settings, and the lessons learned may help strengthen responses to other pandemics or comparable prolonged public health emergencies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus