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Retrospective evaluation of control measures for contacts of patient with Marburg hemorrhagic fever.

Timen A, Isken LD, Willemse P, van den Berkmortel F, Koopmans MP, van Oudheusden DE, Bleeker-Rovers CP, Brouwer AE, Grol RP, Hulscher ME, van Dissel JT - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Bottom Line: A total of 67 (87.0%) of 77 respondents agreed that temperature monitoring and reporting was necessary, significantly more often among high-risk than low-risk contacts (p<0.001).Strict compliance with daily temperature monitoring decreased from 80.5% (62/77) during week 1 to 66.2% (51/77) during week 3.High-risk contacts had significantly higher scores on psychological impact scales (p<0.001) during and after the monitoring period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

ABSTRACT
After an imported case of Marburg hemorrhagic fever was reported in 2008 in the Netherlands, control measures to prevent transmission were implemented. To evaluate consequences of these measures, we administered a structured questionnaire to 130 contacts classified as either having high-risk or low-risk exposure to body fluids of the case-patient; 77 (59.2%) of 130 contacts responded. A total of 67 (87.0%) of 77 respondents agreed that temperature monitoring and reporting was necessary, significantly more often among high-risk than low-risk contacts (p<0.001). Strict compliance with daily temperature monitoring decreased from 80.5% (62/77) during week 1 to 66.2% (51/77) during week 3. Contacts expressed concern about development of Marburg hemorrhagic fever (58.4%, 45/77) and infecting a family member (40.2%, 31/77). High-risk contacts had significantly higher scores on psychological impact scales (p<0.001) during and after the monitoring period. Public health authorities should specifically address consequences of control measures on the daily life of contacts.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of individual scores on the impact of event scale (IES) during and after (a 7-day period before completion of a questionnaire) the monitoring period among contacts of the person with Marburg hemorrhagic fever, the Netherlands, 2008. Each circle indicates 1 person. A higher score indicates a higher level of stress.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Distribution of individual scores on the impact of event scale (IES) during and after (a 7-day period before completion of a questionnaire) the monitoring period among contacts of the person with Marburg hemorrhagic fever, the Netherlands, 2008. Each circle indicates 1 person. A higher score indicates a higher level of stress.

Mentions: Means were calculated on the basis of the answers on the IES and subscale domains (intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal). Overall psychological distress was measured by the mean ± SD score on the IES during monitoring (2.8 ± 2.6, range 0.2–10) and 5–7 months after monitoring 0.9 (0.9 ± 1.7, range 0–9.5; p<0.001). Despite the low overall mean score, high individual scores were observed (Figure). On the subscale domains, the mean scores were higher during the monitoring period than after it, and the highest scores were reported in the high-risk group.


Retrospective evaluation of control measures for contacts of patient with Marburg hemorrhagic fever.

Timen A, Isken LD, Willemse P, van den Berkmortel F, Koopmans MP, van Oudheusden DE, Bleeker-Rovers CP, Brouwer AE, Grol RP, Hulscher ME, van Dissel JT - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2012)

Distribution of individual scores on the impact of event scale (IES) during and after (a 7-day period before completion of a questionnaire) the monitoring period among contacts of the person with Marburg hemorrhagic fever, the Netherlands, 2008. Each circle indicates 1 person. A higher score indicates a higher level of stress.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376788&req=5

Figure 1: Distribution of individual scores on the impact of event scale (IES) during and after (a 7-day period before completion of a questionnaire) the monitoring period among contacts of the person with Marburg hemorrhagic fever, the Netherlands, 2008. Each circle indicates 1 person. A higher score indicates a higher level of stress.
Mentions: Means were calculated on the basis of the answers on the IES and subscale domains (intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal). Overall psychological distress was measured by the mean ± SD score on the IES during monitoring (2.8 ± 2.6, range 0.2–10) and 5–7 months after monitoring 0.9 (0.9 ± 1.7, range 0–9.5; p<0.001). Despite the low overall mean score, high individual scores were observed (Figure). On the subscale domains, the mean scores were higher during the monitoring period than after it, and the highest scores were reported in the high-risk group.

Bottom Line: A total of 67 (87.0%) of 77 respondents agreed that temperature monitoring and reporting was necessary, significantly more often among high-risk than low-risk contacts (p<0.001).Strict compliance with daily temperature monitoring decreased from 80.5% (62/77) during week 1 to 66.2% (51/77) during week 3.High-risk contacts had significantly higher scores on psychological impact scales (p<0.001) during and after the monitoring period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

ABSTRACT
After an imported case of Marburg hemorrhagic fever was reported in 2008 in the Netherlands, control measures to prevent transmission were implemented. To evaluate consequences of these measures, we administered a structured questionnaire to 130 contacts classified as either having high-risk or low-risk exposure to body fluids of the case-patient; 77 (59.2%) of 130 contacts responded. A total of 67 (87.0%) of 77 respondents agreed that temperature monitoring and reporting was necessary, significantly more often among high-risk than low-risk contacts (p<0.001). Strict compliance with daily temperature monitoring decreased from 80.5% (62/77) during week 1 to 66.2% (51/77) during week 3. Contacts expressed concern about development of Marburg hemorrhagic fever (58.4%, 45/77) and infecting a family member (40.2%, 31/77). High-risk contacts had significantly higher scores on psychological impact scales (p<0.001) during and after the monitoring period. Public health authorities should specifically address consequences of control measures on the daily life of contacts.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus