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The Effect of Preoperative Weight Loss before Gastric Bypass: A Systematic Review.

Kadeli DK, Sczepaniak JP, Kumar K, Youssef C, Mahdavi A, Owens M - J Obes (2012)

Bottom Line: Results.Six studies supported our hypothesis, five were inconclusive, and no study refuted.Conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: John Sczepaniak Medical Enterprises, 6871 Eberhart Street, San Diego, CA 92115, USA.

ABSTRACT
Background. Many insurance companies require obese patients to lose weight prior to gastric bypass. From a previous study by the same authors, preoperative weight at surgery is strongly predictive of weight loss up to one year after surgery. This review aims to determine whether preoperative weight loss is also correlated with weight loss up to one year after surgery. Methods. Of the 186 results screened using PubMed, 12 studies were identified. A meta-analysis was performed to further classify studies (A class, B class, regression, and rejected). Results. Of all 12 studies, one met the criteria for A class, six were B class, four were regression, and one was rejected. Six studies supported our hypothesis, five were inconclusive, and no study refuted. Conclusions. Preoperative weight loss is additive to postsurgery weight loss as predicted from the weight at the time of surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of class B study. Graph showing ten hypothetical patients in class B study who have been divided into weight loss (blue) and weight gain (red) groups. The weight loss group was statistically different from the weight gain group at initial consultation. *Confidence interval 95%.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig3: Example of class B study. Graph showing ten hypothetical patients in class B study who have been divided into weight loss (blue) and weight gain (red) groups. The weight loss group was statistically different from the weight gain group at initial consultation. *Confidence interval 95%.

Mentions: In class B studies weight loss and weight gain groups had different mean weights (P < 0.05) at initial consultation but similar means at the time of surgery. This is demonstrated in Figure 3 by using two groups with five hypothetical patients in each who begin with different weights at initial consultation but eventually enter the surgery with similar mean weights.


The Effect of Preoperative Weight Loss before Gastric Bypass: A Systematic Review.

Kadeli DK, Sczepaniak JP, Kumar K, Youssef C, Mahdavi A, Owens M - J Obes (2012)

Example of class B study. Graph showing ten hypothetical patients in class B study who have been divided into weight loss (blue) and weight gain (red) groups. The weight loss group was statistically different from the weight gain group at initial consultation. *Confidence interval 95%.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376766&req=5

fig3: Example of class B study. Graph showing ten hypothetical patients in class B study who have been divided into weight loss (blue) and weight gain (red) groups. The weight loss group was statistically different from the weight gain group at initial consultation. *Confidence interval 95%.
Mentions: In class B studies weight loss and weight gain groups had different mean weights (P < 0.05) at initial consultation but similar means at the time of surgery. This is demonstrated in Figure 3 by using two groups with five hypothetical patients in each who begin with different weights at initial consultation but eventually enter the surgery with similar mean weights.

Bottom Line: Results.Six studies supported our hypothesis, five were inconclusive, and no study refuted.Conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: John Sczepaniak Medical Enterprises, 6871 Eberhart Street, San Diego, CA 92115, USA.

ABSTRACT
Background. Many insurance companies require obese patients to lose weight prior to gastric bypass. From a previous study by the same authors, preoperative weight at surgery is strongly predictive of weight loss up to one year after surgery. This review aims to determine whether preoperative weight loss is also correlated with weight loss up to one year after surgery. Methods. Of the 186 results screened using PubMed, 12 studies were identified. A meta-analysis was performed to further classify studies (A class, B class, regression, and rejected). Results. Of all 12 studies, one met the criteria for A class, six were B class, four were regression, and one was rejected. Six studies supported our hypothesis, five were inconclusive, and no study refuted. Conclusions. Preoperative weight loss is additive to postsurgery weight loss as predicted from the weight at the time of surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus