Limits...
Enhanced emotional reactivity after selective REM sleep deprivation in humans: an fMRI study.

Rosales-Lagarde A, Armony JL, Del Río-Portilla Y, Trejo-Martínez D, Conde R, Corsi-Cabrera M - Front Behav Neurosci (2012)

Bottom Line: Behaviorally, emotional reactivity was enhanced relative to baseline (BL) in the REM deprived group only.In contrast, activity in these areas remained the same level or even increased in the REM-D group, compared to their BL level.Taken together, these results suggest that lack of REM sleep in humans is associated with enhanced emotional reactivity, both at behavioral and neural levels, and thus highlight the specific role of REM sleep in regulating the neural substrates for emotional responsiveness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Psychology, Laboratory of Sleep, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México México DF, México.

ABSTRACT
Converging evidence from animal and human studies suggest that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep modulates emotional processing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of selective REM sleep deprivation (REM-D) on emotional responses to threatening visual stimuli and their brain correlates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: selective REM-D, by awakening them at each REM sleep onset, or non-rapid eye movement sleep interruptions (NREM-I) as control for potential non-specific effects of awakenings and lack of sleep. In a within-subject design, a visual emotional reactivity task was performed in the scanner before and 24 h after sleep manipulation. Behaviorally, emotional reactivity was enhanced relative to baseline (BL) in the REM deprived group only. In terms of fMRI signal, there was, as expected, an overall decrease in activity in the NREM-I group when subjects performed the task the second time, particularly in regions involved in emotional processing, such as occipital and temporal areas, as well as in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, involved in top-down emotion regulation. In contrast, activity in these areas remained the same level or even increased in the REM-D group, compared to their BL level. Taken together, these results suggest that lack of REM sleep in humans is associated with enhanced emotional reactivity, both at behavioral and neural levels, and thus highlight the specific role of REM sleep in regulating the neural substrates for emotional responsiveness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Difference in the number of high emotional reactivity trials (HER, see Methods for details) and in reaction times for HER and low emotional reactivity trials (LER) after REM sleep deprivation (REM-D) or non-REM sleep interruptions nights (NREM-I). Asterisks above brackets indicate significant post-hoc differences between groups whereas asterisks above individual bars represent significant differences from zero.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376727&req=5

Figure 3: Difference in the number of high emotional reactivity trials (HER, see Methods for details) and in reaction times for HER and low emotional reactivity trials (LER) after REM sleep deprivation (REM-D) or non-REM sleep interruptions nights (NREM-I). Asterisks above brackets indicate significant post-hoc differences between groups whereas asterisks above individual bars represent significant differences from zero.

Mentions: As shown in Figure 3, the number of HER responses was increased after REM-D (before REM-D: mean = 26.3, SD = 4.8; after REM-D: mean = 31.6, SD = 4.7; t = 4.50; p < 0.0009), whereas emotional reactivity was not modified in the NREM-I group (before NREM-I: mean = 30.3, SD = 7.8; after NREM-I: mean = 31.7, SD = 2.9; t = 1.24; p = 0.26).


Enhanced emotional reactivity after selective REM sleep deprivation in humans: an fMRI study.

Rosales-Lagarde A, Armony JL, Del Río-Portilla Y, Trejo-Martínez D, Conde R, Corsi-Cabrera M - Front Behav Neurosci (2012)

Difference in the number of high emotional reactivity trials (HER, see Methods for details) and in reaction times for HER and low emotional reactivity trials (LER) after REM sleep deprivation (REM-D) or non-REM sleep interruptions nights (NREM-I). Asterisks above brackets indicate significant post-hoc differences between groups whereas asterisks above individual bars represent significant differences from zero.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376727&req=5

Figure 3: Difference in the number of high emotional reactivity trials (HER, see Methods for details) and in reaction times for HER and low emotional reactivity trials (LER) after REM sleep deprivation (REM-D) or non-REM sleep interruptions nights (NREM-I). Asterisks above brackets indicate significant post-hoc differences between groups whereas asterisks above individual bars represent significant differences from zero.
Mentions: As shown in Figure 3, the number of HER responses was increased after REM-D (before REM-D: mean = 26.3, SD = 4.8; after REM-D: mean = 31.6, SD = 4.7; t = 4.50; p < 0.0009), whereas emotional reactivity was not modified in the NREM-I group (before NREM-I: mean = 30.3, SD = 7.8; after NREM-I: mean = 31.7, SD = 2.9; t = 1.24; p = 0.26).

Bottom Line: Behaviorally, emotional reactivity was enhanced relative to baseline (BL) in the REM deprived group only.In contrast, activity in these areas remained the same level or even increased in the REM-D group, compared to their BL level.Taken together, these results suggest that lack of REM sleep in humans is associated with enhanced emotional reactivity, both at behavioral and neural levels, and thus highlight the specific role of REM sleep in regulating the neural substrates for emotional responsiveness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Psychology, Laboratory of Sleep, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México México DF, México.

ABSTRACT
Converging evidence from animal and human studies suggest that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep modulates emotional processing. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of selective REM sleep deprivation (REM-D) on emotional responses to threatening visual stimuli and their brain correlates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: selective REM-D, by awakening them at each REM sleep onset, or non-rapid eye movement sleep interruptions (NREM-I) as control for potential non-specific effects of awakenings and lack of sleep. In a within-subject design, a visual emotional reactivity task was performed in the scanner before and 24 h after sleep manipulation. Behaviorally, emotional reactivity was enhanced relative to baseline (BL) in the REM deprived group only. In terms of fMRI signal, there was, as expected, an overall decrease in activity in the NREM-I group when subjects performed the task the second time, particularly in regions involved in emotional processing, such as occipital and temporal areas, as well as in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, involved in top-down emotion regulation. In contrast, activity in these areas remained the same level or even increased in the REM-D group, compared to their BL level. Taken together, these results suggest that lack of REM sleep in humans is associated with enhanced emotional reactivity, both at behavioral and neural levels, and thus highlight the specific role of REM sleep in regulating the neural substrates for emotional responsiveness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus