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An organic/inorganic hybrid membrane as a solid "turn-on" fluorescent chemosensor for coenzyme A (CoA), cysteine (Cys), and glutathione (GSH) in aqueous media.

Vallejos S, Estévez P, Ibeas S, García FC, Serna F, García JM - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: In this way, the water insoluble sensing motif can be exploited in aqueous media.The sensory motif within the membrane is a chemically anchored piperazinedione-derivative with a weakly bound Hg(II).The response is caused by the displacement of the cation from the membrane due to a stronger complexation with the biomolecules, thus releasing the fluorescent sensory moieties within the membrane.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Burgos, Burgos, Spain. svallejos@ubu.es

ABSTRACT
The preparation of a fluorogenic sensory material for the detection of biomolecules is described. Strategic functionalisation and copolymerisation of a water insoluble organic sensory molecule with hydrophilic comonomers yielded a crosslinked, water-swellable, easy-to-manipulate solid system for water "dip-in" fluorogenic coenzyme A, cysteine, and glutathione detection by means of host-guest interactions. The sensory material was a membrane with gel-like behaviour, which exhibits a change in fluorescence behaviour upon swelling with a water solution of the target molecules. The membrane follows a "turn-on" pattern, which permits the titration of the abovementioned biomolecules. In this way, the water insoluble sensing motif can be exploited in aqueous media. The sensory motif within the membrane is a chemically anchored piperazinedione-derivative with a weakly bound Hg(II). The response is caused by the displacement of the cation from the membrane due to a stronger complexation with the biomolecules, thus releasing the fluorescent sensory moieties within the membrane.

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TGA curves of membranes M1 and M2. The degradation pattern of M2 after a cycle of soaking in pure water for 3 h with subsequent drying at rt is also included.
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f3-sensors-12-02969: TGA curves of membranes M1 and M2. The degradation pattern of M2 after a cycle of soaking in pure water for 3 h with subsequent drying at rt is also included.

Mentions: The thermal resistance of the membranes was evaluated using TGA. The decomposition temperatures that resulted in 5% and 10% weight loss under a nitrogen atmosphere (T5 and T10, respectively) were approximately 360 and 385 °C, which indicates the material had reasonably good thermal stability. M1 and M2 had a first weight loss at 200 °C, which was attributed to the non-reticulated chain ends [29]. The TGA curves of the membranes are shown in Figure 3. The residue remaining after reaching 800 °C was negligible for M1 and approximately 8% for M2, which confirms the influence of the mercury content in the thermal behaviour. The mercury was first oxidised to HgO, which indicates the hybrid nature of the membrane. The immersion of membrane M2 in water resulted in an insignificant loss of bound Hg(II), as determined by comparing the amount of residue that remained at 800 °C under a nitrogen atmosphere for two samples of M2 that were soaked in pure water for 3 and 24 h and subsequently dried. Both samples resulted in a residue of 8%. Nevertheless, the analysis of the role of the Hg(II) by TGA is cumbersome, because of the behaviour of the mercury salts upon heating. Initially, mercury oxides formed, and then, metallic mercury was formed with concomitant sublimation [30]. Changing the atmosphere from nitrogen to air yielded the complete loss of mass at 800 °C for M1 and M2, which gave rise to a zero char yield.


An organic/inorganic hybrid membrane as a solid "turn-on" fluorescent chemosensor for coenzyme A (CoA), cysteine (Cys), and glutathione (GSH) in aqueous media.

Vallejos S, Estévez P, Ibeas S, García FC, Serna F, García JM - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

TGA curves of membranes M1 and M2. The degradation pattern of M2 after a cycle of soaking in pure water for 3 h with subsequent drying at rt is also included.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376624&req=5

f3-sensors-12-02969: TGA curves of membranes M1 and M2. The degradation pattern of M2 after a cycle of soaking in pure water for 3 h with subsequent drying at rt is also included.
Mentions: The thermal resistance of the membranes was evaluated using TGA. The decomposition temperatures that resulted in 5% and 10% weight loss under a nitrogen atmosphere (T5 and T10, respectively) were approximately 360 and 385 °C, which indicates the material had reasonably good thermal stability. M1 and M2 had a first weight loss at 200 °C, which was attributed to the non-reticulated chain ends [29]. The TGA curves of the membranes are shown in Figure 3. The residue remaining after reaching 800 °C was negligible for M1 and approximately 8% for M2, which confirms the influence of the mercury content in the thermal behaviour. The mercury was first oxidised to HgO, which indicates the hybrid nature of the membrane. The immersion of membrane M2 in water resulted in an insignificant loss of bound Hg(II), as determined by comparing the amount of residue that remained at 800 °C under a nitrogen atmosphere for two samples of M2 that were soaked in pure water for 3 and 24 h and subsequently dried. Both samples resulted in a residue of 8%. Nevertheless, the analysis of the role of the Hg(II) by TGA is cumbersome, because of the behaviour of the mercury salts upon heating. Initially, mercury oxides formed, and then, metallic mercury was formed with concomitant sublimation [30]. Changing the atmosphere from nitrogen to air yielded the complete loss of mass at 800 °C for M1 and M2, which gave rise to a zero char yield.

Bottom Line: In this way, the water insoluble sensing motif can be exploited in aqueous media.The sensory motif within the membrane is a chemically anchored piperazinedione-derivative with a weakly bound Hg(II).The response is caused by the displacement of the cation from the membrane due to a stronger complexation with the biomolecules, thus releasing the fluorescent sensory moieties within the membrane.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Burgos, Burgos, Spain. svallejos@ubu.es

ABSTRACT
The preparation of a fluorogenic sensory material for the detection of biomolecules is described. Strategic functionalisation and copolymerisation of a water insoluble organic sensory molecule with hydrophilic comonomers yielded a crosslinked, water-swellable, easy-to-manipulate solid system for water "dip-in" fluorogenic coenzyme A, cysteine, and glutathione detection by means of host-guest interactions. The sensory material was a membrane with gel-like behaviour, which exhibits a change in fluorescence behaviour upon swelling with a water solution of the target molecules. The membrane follows a "turn-on" pattern, which permits the titration of the abovementioned biomolecules. In this way, the water insoluble sensing motif can be exploited in aqueous media. The sensory motif within the membrane is a chemically anchored piperazinedione-derivative with a weakly bound Hg(II). The response is caused by the displacement of the cation from the membrane due to a stronger complexation with the biomolecules, thus releasing the fluorescent sensory moieties within the membrane.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus