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Metamaterials application in sensing.

Chen T, Li S, Sun H - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: Metamaterials are artificial media structured on a size scale smaller than wavelength of external stimuli, and they can exhibit a strong localization and enhancement of fields, which may provide novel tools to significantly enhance the sensitivity and resolution of sensors, and open new degrees of freedom in sensing design aspect.This paper mainly presents the recent progress concerning metamaterials-based sensing, and detailedly reviews the principle, detecting process and sensitivity of three distinct types of sensors based on metamaterials, as well as their challenges and prospects.Moreover, the design guidelines for each sensor and its performance are compared and summarized.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mechanical & Power Engineering College, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080, China. chentao@hrbust.edu.cn

ABSTRACT
Metamaterials are artificial media structured on a size scale smaller than wavelength of external stimuli, and they can exhibit a strong localization and enhancement of fields, which may provide novel tools to significantly enhance the sensitivity and resolution of sensors, and open new degrees of freedom in sensing design aspect. This paper mainly presents the recent progress concerning metamaterials-based sensing, and detailedly reviews the principle, detecting process and sensitivity of three distinct types of sensors based on metamaterials, as well as their challenges and prospects. Moreover, the design guidelines for each sensor and its performance are compared and summarized.

No MeSH data available.


Layout of (a) the circular aDSR and (b) the rectangular aDSR with field confining tips, spatial field distribution in case of an excited field strength of 1 V/m for (c) the circular aDSR and (d) the rectangular aDSR with field confining tips [64].
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f7-sensors-12-02742: Layout of (a) the circular aDSR and (b) the rectangular aDSR with field confining tips, spatial field distribution in case of an excited field strength of 1 V/m for (c) the circular aDSR and (d) the rectangular aDSR with field confining tips [64].

Mentions: To further improve the electric field distribution, a rectangular tip-shaped aDSRs with sharp tips was proposed based on the above ideas, which can offer a very high sensitivity at miniaturized scale [64]. Figure 7 showed the schematic layout and electric distribution of the unit cells for both circular and rectangular resonators, compared with the traditional structure. In the case of the circular aDSR, the strongest field amplitude was located at the end pieces of the longer resonator arm with peak values of 13.7 V/m, while the field components inside the gap remained relatively small. In contrast to that behavior, the rectangular aDSR with tips strongly confined the field into the gap with peak values of 17.1 V/m so that this area became very sensitive to changes in the dielectric environment. In summary, the rectangular design offered a miniaturization compared with circular structures. Furthermore, the tips at the end of the resonator arms concentrated the field components into a small area, increasing the volumetric sensitivity of the device. For example, the circular aDSR featured a resonant shift of 9, 24, and 48 MHz for the single covered square, the two covered squares, and the full coverage, respectively. This was considerably less than the values observed for the rectangular resonator with tips, where the corresponding shifts were 18, 36, and 78 MHz. Furthermore, the resonant frequency of the rectangular aDSR without any overlayer lied at 5.993 GHz, which was roughly 77% of the design frequency of the circular aDSR, located at 7.716 GHz. As both devices shared the same unit cell dimensions, a miniaturization by 23% was achieved.


Metamaterials application in sensing.

Chen T, Li S, Sun H - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Layout of (a) the circular aDSR and (b) the rectangular aDSR with field confining tips, spatial field distribution in case of an excited field strength of 1 V/m for (c) the circular aDSR and (d) the rectangular aDSR with field confining tips [64].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376603&req=5

f7-sensors-12-02742: Layout of (a) the circular aDSR and (b) the rectangular aDSR with field confining tips, spatial field distribution in case of an excited field strength of 1 V/m for (c) the circular aDSR and (d) the rectangular aDSR with field confining tips [64].
Mentions: To further improve the electric field distribution, a rectangular tip-shaped aDSRs with sharp tips was proposed based on the above ideas, which can offer a very high sensitivity at miniaturized scale [64]. Figure 7 showed the schematic layout and electric distribution of the unit cells for both circular and rectangular resonators, compared with the traditional structure. In the case of the circular aDSR, the strongest field amplitude was located at the end pieces of the longer resonator arm with peak values of 13.7 V/m, while the field components inside the gap remained relatively small. In contrast to that behavior, the rectangular aDSR with tips strongly confined the field into the gap with peak values of 17.1 V/m so that this area became very sensitive to changes in the dielectric environment. In summary, the rectangular design offered a miniaturization compared with circular structures. Furthermore, the tips at the end of the resonator arms concentrated the field components into a small area, increasing the volumetric sensitivity of the device. For example, the circular aDSR featured a resonant shift of 9, 24, and 48 MHz for the single covered square, the two covered squares, and the full coverage, respectively. This was considerably less than the values observed for the rectangular resonator with tips, where the corresponding shifts were 18, 36, and 78 MHz. Furthermore, the resonant frequency of the rectangular aDSR without any overlayer lied at 5.993 GHz, which was roughly 77% of the design frequency of the circular aDSR, located at 7.716 GHz. As both devices shared the same unit cell dimensions, a miniaturization by 23% was achieved.

Bottom Line: Metamaterials are artificial media structured on a size scale smaller than wavelength of external stimuli, and they can exhibit a strong localization and enhancement of fields, which may provide novel tools to significantly enhance the sensitivity and resolution of sensors, and open new degrees of freedom in sensing design aspect.This paper mainly presents the recent progress concerning metamaterials-based sensing, and detailedly reviews the principle, detecting process and sensitivity of three distinct types of sensors based on metamaterials, as well as their challenges and prospects.Moreover, the design guidelines for each sensor and its performance are compared and summarized.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mechanical & Power Engineering College, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080, China. chentao@hrbust.edu.cn

ABSTRACT
Metamaterials are artificial media structured on a size scale smaller than wavelength of external stimuli, and they can exhibit a strong localization and enhancement of fields, which may provide novel tools to significantly enhance the sensitivity and resolution of sensors, and open new degrees of freedom in sensing design aspect. This paper mainly presents the recent progress concerning metamaterials-based sensing, and detailedly reviews the principle, detecting process and sensitivity of three distinct types of sensors based on metamaterials, as well as their challenges and prospects. Moreover, the design guidelines for each sensor and its performance are compared and summarized.

No MeSH data available.