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Comparison of the characteristics of small commercial NDIR CO2 sensor models and development of a portable CO2 measurement device.

Yasuda T, Yonemura S, Tani A - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: When the correction was applied to the sensors, the accuracy of measurements improved significantly in the case of the K30 and AN100 units.In particular, in the case of K30 the relative RMS error decreased from 24% to 4%.This indicates that acceptable accuracy can be realized using the calibration method developed in this study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plant and Environmental Sciences, Department of Environmental Health Science, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka Japan. p09402@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
Many sensors have to be used simultaneously for multipoint carbon dioxide (CO(2)) observation. All the sensors should be calibrated in advance, but this is a time-consuming process. To seek a simplified calibration method, we used four commercial CO(2) sensor models and characterized their output tendencies against ambient temperature and length of use, in addition to offset characteristics. We used four samples of standard gas with different CO(2) concentrations (0, 407, 1,110, and 1,810 ppm). The outputs of K30 and AN100 models showed linear relationships with temperature and length of use. Calibration coefficients for sensor models were determined using the data from three individual sensors of the same model to minimize the relative RMS error. When the correction was applied to the sensors, the accuracy of measurements improved significantly in the case of the K30 and AN100 units. In particular, in the case of K30 the relative RMS error decreased from 24% to 4%. Hence, we have chosen K30 for developing a portable CO(2) measurement device (10 × 10 × 15 cm, 900 g). Data of CO(2) concentration, measurement time and location, temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure can be recorded onto a Secure Digital (SD) memory card. The CO(2) concentration in a high-school lecture room was monitored with this device. The CO(2) data, when corrected for simultaneously measured temperature, water vapor partial pressure, and atmospheric pressure, showed a good agreement with the data measured by a highly accurate CO(2) analyzer, LI-6262. This indicates that acceptable accuracy can be realized using the calibration method developed in this study.

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Cluster analysis using the data obtained on 25 February 2010. Air temperatures were 10 °C, 25 °C, and 40 °C, length of use was 1 day. A durable solid electrolyte CO2 sensor CDM4160 (Figaro Engineering Inc.) was also included in the analysis.
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f3-sensors-12-03641: Cluster analysis using the data obtained on 25 February 2010. Air temperatures were 10 °C, 25 °C, and 40 °C, length of use was 1 day. A durable solid electrolyte CO2 sensor CDM4160 (Figaro Engineering Inc.) was also included in the analysis.

Mentions: In our study, cluster analysis was conducted for the output of each sensor (Figure 3). Output patterns differed between sensor models. However, the same tendency was seen in the output patterns of individual sensors in identical models, suggesting that the same calibration method is applicable for the individuals of an identical model, while different calibration coefficients should be determined for different sensor models.


Comparison of the characteristics of small commercial NDIR CO2 sensor models and development of a portable CO2 measurement device.

Yasuda T, Yonemura S, Tani A - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Cluster analysis using the data obtained on 25 February 2010. Air temperatures were 10 °C, 25 °C, and 40 °C, length of use was 1 day. A durable solid electrolyte CO2 sensor CDM4160 (Figaro Engineering Inc.) was also included in the analysis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376595&req=5

f3-sensors-12-03641: Cluster analysis using the data obtained on 25 February 2010. Air temperatures were 10 °C, 25 °C, and 40 °C, length of use was 1 day. A durable solid electrolyte CO2 sensor CDM4160 (Figaro Engineering Inc.) was also included in the analysis.
Mentions: In our study, cluster analysis was conducted for the output of each sensor (Figure 3). Output patterns differed between sensor models. However, the same tendency was seen in the output patterns of individual sensors in identical models, suggesting that the same calibration method is applicable for the individuals of an identical model, while different calibration coefficients should be determined for different sensor models.

Bottom Line: When the correction was applied to the sensors, the accuracy of measurements improved significantly in the case of the K30 and AN100 units.In particular, in the case of K30 the relative RMS error decreased from 24% to 4%.This indicates that acceptable accuracy can be realized using the calibration method developed in this study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plant and Environmental Sciences, Department of Environmental Health Science, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka Japan. p09402@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp

ABSTRACT
Many sensors have to be used simultaneously for multipoint carbon dioxide (CO(2)) observation. All the sensors should be calibrated in advance, but this is a time-consuming process. To seek a simplified calibration method, we used four commercial CO(2) sensor models and characterized their output tendencies against ambient temperature and length of use, in addition to offset characteristics. We used four samples of standard gas with different CO(2) concentrations (0, 407, 1,110, and 1,810 ppm). The outputs of K30 and AN100 models showed linear relationships with temperature and length of use. Calibration coefficients for sensor models were determined using the data from three individual sensors of the same model to minimize the relative RMS error. When the correction was applied to the sensors, the accuracy of measurements improved significantly in the case of the K30 and AN100 units. In particular, in the case of K30 the relative RMS error decreased from 24% to 4%. Hence, we have chosen K30 for developing a portable CO(2) measurement device (10 × 10 × 15 cm, 900 g). Data of CO(2) concentration, measurement time and location, temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure can be recorded onto a Secure Digital (SD) memory card. The CO(2) concentration in a high-school lecture room was monitored with this device. The CO(2) data, when corrected for simultaneously measured temperature, water vapor partial pressure, and atmospheric pressure, showed a good agreement with the data measured by a highly accurate CO(2) analyzer, LI-6262. This indicates that acceptable accuracy can be realized using the calibration method developed in this study.

Show MeSH