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Inertial sensing to determine movement disorder motion present before and after treatment.

Teskey WJ, Elhabiby M, El-Sheimy N - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: It was quite surprising that this coherence analysis depicts that there is a statistically significant relationship using coherence analysis when differentiating between control and effectively medicated PD motion.Dyskinesia is involuntary motion or the absence of intended motion, and it is a common side effect among medicated PD patients.As well, the finding that PD motion, when well medicated, does still differ significantly from control motion allows for researchers to quantify potential deficiencies in the use of medication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geomatics Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. wjeteske@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
There has been a lot of interest in recent years in using inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) to monitor movement disorder motion and monitor the efficacy of treatment options. Two of the most prominent movement disorders, which are under evaluation in this research paper, are essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson's disease (PD). These movement disorders are first evaluated to show that ET and PD motion often depict more (tremor) motion content in the 3-12 Hz frequency band of interest than control data and that such tremor motion can be characterized using inertial sensors. As well, coherence analysis is used to compare between pairs of many of the six degrees-of-freedom of motions under evaluation, to determine the similarity in tremor motion for the various degrees-of-freedom at different frequency bands of interest. It was quite surprising that this coherence analysis depicts that there is a statistically significant relationship using coherence analysis when differentiating between control and effectively medicated PD motion. The statistical analysis uncovers the novel finding that PD medication induced dyskinesia is depicted within coherence data from inertial signals. Dyskinesia is involuntary motion or the absence of intended motion, and it is a common side effect among medicated PD patients. The results show that inertial sensors can be used to differentiate between effectively medicated PD motion and control motion; such a differentiation can often be difficult to perform with the human eye because effectively medicated PD patients tend to not produce much tremor. As well, the finding that PD motion, when well medicated, does still differ significantly from control motion allows for researchers to quantify potential deficiencies in the use of medication. By using inertial sensors to spot such deficiencies, as outlined in this research paper, it is hoped that medications with even a larger degree of efficacy can be created in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

X-accelerometer and y-gyroscope coherence analysis averaged over the populations examined.
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f7-sensors-12-03512: X-accelerometer and y-gyroscope coherence analysis averaged over the populations examined.

Mentions: Another (less dominant) tremor observed was a lateral z-axis tremor occurring concurrently with a rotational x-axis tremor. This less dominant form of tremor was similar to a clawing motion where someone is striking downwards with his or her hand. A similar pattern to what is seen in Figures 5, 6 and 7 (as explained in the next few pages) is also seen for some subjects when comparing the z-axis lateral tremor and x-axis rotational tremor. Figures 5, 6 and 7 depict the x-axis lateral tremor, which occurred concurrently with the y-axis rotational tremor; the tremor depicted in these figures was present for almost all test subjects (unlike the z-axis lateral tremor, that occurred concurrently with the x-axis rotational tremor). It is because the x-axis lateral tremor and y-axis rotational tremor were so common that they were chosen for analysis. Other than the x-axis lateral and y-axis rotational tremor set, as well as the z-axis lateral and x-axis rotational tremor set, there were no other major tremor types broadly observed from test subjects.


Inertial sensing to determine movement disorder motion present before and after treatment.

Teskey WJ, Elhabiby M, El-Sheimy N - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

X-accelerometer and y-gyroscope coherence analysis averaged over the populations examined.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376555&req=5

f7-sensors-12-03512: X-accelerometer and y-gyroscope coherence analysis averaged over the populations examined.
Mentions: Another (less dominant) tremor observed was a lateral z-axis tremor occurring concurrently with a rotational x-axis tremor. This less dominant form of tremor was similar to a clawing motion where someone is striking downwards with his or her hand. A similar pattern to what is seen in Figures 5, 6 and 7 (as explained in the next few pages) is also seen for some subjects when comparing the z-axis lateral tremor and x-axis rotational tremor. Figures 5, 6 and 7 depict the x-axis lateral tremor, which occurred concurrently with the y-axis rotational tremor; the tremor depicted in these figures was present for almost all test subjects (unlike the z-axis lateral tremor, that occurred concurrently with the x-axis rotational tremor). It is because the x-axis lateral tremor and y-axis rotational tremor were so common that they were chosen for analysis. Other than the x-axis lateral and y-axis rotational tremor set, as well as the z-axis lateral and x-axis rotational tremor set, there were no other major tremor types broadly observed from test subjects.

Bottom Line: It was quite surprising that this coherence analysis depicts that there is a statistically significant relationship using coherence analysis when differentiating between control and effectively medicated PD motion.Dyskinesia is involuntary motion or the absence of intended motion, and it is a common side effect among medicated PD patients.As well, the finding that PD motion, when well medicated, does still differ significantly from control motion allows for researchers to quantify potential deficiencies in the use of medication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geomatics Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. wjeteske@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
There has been a lot of interest in recent years in using inertial sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) to monitor movement disorder motion and monitor the efficacy of treatment options. Two of the most prominent movement disorders, which are under evaluation in this research paper, are essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson's disease (PD). These movement disorders are first evaluated to show that ET and PD motion often depict more (tremor) motion content in the 3-12 Hz frequency band of interest than control data and that such tremor motion can be characterized using inertial sensors. As well, coherence analysis is used to compare between pairs of many of the six degrees-of-freedom of motions under evaluation, to determine the similarity in tremor motion for the various degrees-of-freedom at different frequency bands of interest. It was quite surprising that this coherence analysis depicts that there is a statistically significant relationship using coherence analysis when differentiating between control and effectively medicated PD motion. The statistical analysis uncovers the novel finding that PD medication induced dyskinesia is depicted within coherence data from inertial signals. Dyskinesia is involuntary motion or the absence of intended motion, and it is a common side effect among medicated PD patients. The results show that inertial sensors can be used to differentiate between effectively medicated PD motion and control motion; such a differentiation can often be difficult to perform with the human eye because effectively medicated PD patients tend to not produce much tremor. As well, the finding that PD motion, when well medicated, does still differ significantly from control motion allows for researchers to quantify potential deficiencies in the use of medication. By using inertial sensors to spot such deficiencies, as outlined in this research paper, it is hoped that medications with even a larger degree of efficacy can be created in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus