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Design and testing of a multi-sensor pedestrian location and navigation platform.

Morrison A, Renaudin V, Bancroft JB, Lachapelle G - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required.The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact.Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PLAN Group, Schulich School of Engineering, The University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada. ajmorris@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
Navigation and location technologies are continually advancing, allowing ever higher accuracies and operation under ever more challenging conditions. The development of such technologies requires the rapid evaluation of a large number of sensors and related utilization strategies. The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) with accelerometers, gyros, barometers, magnetometers and other sensors is allowing for novel applications, but is hindered by the difficulties to test and compare integrated solutions using multiple sensor sets. In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required. This paper describes the design and testing of the NavCube, a multi-sensor navigation, location and timing platform. The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact. Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hiker wearing the NavCube at the waist, two IMUs attached to the leg above the boots, one IMU on the shoulder and a GNSS antenna on the other shoulder.
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f9-sensors-12-03720: Hiker wearing the NavCube at the waist, two IMUs attached to the leg above the boots, one IMU on the shoulder and a GNSS antenna on the other shoulder.

Mentions: Navigation and body limb motion monitoring are becomingly more critical in athletic training and coaching. Numerous sports, including skiing, running, rowing and field hockey are using multisensory systems to track and improve performance (e.g., [26,42–46]). Because a large part of sport activities takes place outdoors, where users are free to perform any kind of motion, equipment used for performance evaluation must be light and noninvasive. Data collected by a hiker wearing the NavCube has been used for assessing different navigation and biometric parameters. Two APSs were rigidly attached to the legs above the hiking boots and another on the left shoulder; the core module of the NavCube was carried at the waist using a neoprene case and belt, two antennas located on the right shoulder and one antenna rigidly connected to the ASP located on the left foot. The complete data collection setup is illustrated in Figure 9.


Design and testing of a multi-sensor pedestrian location and navigation platform.

Morrison A, Renaudin V, Bancroft JB, Lachapelle G - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Hiker wearing the NavCube at the waist, two IMUs attached to the leg above the boots, one IMU on the shoulder and a GNSS antenna on the other shoulder.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376552&req=5

f9-sensors-12-03720: Hiker wearing the NavCube at the waist, two IMUs attached to the leg above the boots, one IMU on the shoulder and a GNSS antenna on the other shoulder.
Mentions: Navigation and body limb motion monitoring are becomingly more critical in athletic training and coaching. Numerous sports, including skiing, running, rowing and field hockey are using multisensory systems to track and improve performance (e.g., [26,42–46]). Because a large part of sport activities takes place outdoors, where users are free to perform any kind of motion, equipment used for performance evaluation must be light and noninvasive. Data collected by a hiker wearing the NavCube has been used for assessing different navigation and biometric parameters. Two APSs were rigidly attached to the legs above the hiking boots and another on the left shoulder; the core module of the NavCube was carried at the waist using a neoprene case and belt, two antennas located on the right shoulder and one antenna rigidly connected to the ASP located on the left foot. The complete data collection setup is illustrated in Figure 9.

Bottom Line: In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required.The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact.Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PLAN Group, Schulich School of Engineering, The University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada. ajmorris@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
Navigation and location technologies are continually advancing, allowing ever higher accuracies and operation under ever more challenging conditions. The development of such technologies requires the rapid evaluation of a large number of sensors and related utilization strategies. The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) with accelerometers, gyros, barometers, magnetometers and other sensors is allowing for novel applications, but is hindered by the difficulties to test and compare integrated solutions using multiple sensor sets. In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required. This paper describes the design and testing of the NavCube, a multi-sensor navigation, location and timing platform. The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact. Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus