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Design and testing of a multi-sensor pedestrian location and navigation platform.

Morrison A, Renaudin V, Bancroft JB, Lachapelle G - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required.The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact.Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PLAN Group, Schulich School of Engineering, The University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada. ajmorris@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
Navigation and location technologies are continually advancing, allowing ever higher accuracies and operation under ever more challenging conditions. The development of such technologies requires the rapid evaluation of a large number of sensors and related utilization strategies. The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) with accelerometers, gyros, barometers, magnetometers and other sensors is allowing for novel applications, but is hindered by the difficulties to test and compare integrated solutions using multiple sensor sets. In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required. This paper describes the design and testing of the NavCube, a multi-sensor navigation, location and timing platform. The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact. Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

No MeSH data available.


Pedestrian wearing the NavCube in a backpack with one IMU fixed on each foot and one IMU held in hand.
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f5-sensors-12-03720: Pedestrian wearing the NavCube in a backpack with one IMU fixed on each foot and one IMU held in hand.

Mentions: Five men and five women participated in a 450 m flat test course data collection for conducting gait analysis of pedestrians walking, but only using a handheld inertial sensor. Algorithms for detecting steps, classifying the user’s activity and evaluating step frequency had been developed previously (e.g., [37]). To confirm that the proposed step detection methods based on handheld device were reliably detecting user footfalls in both texting and normal walking modes of use, the NavCube was configured to include a foot mounted IMU. A shown in Figure 5, by placing one ASP on each foot as a step detection reference, in addition to one ASP unit in hand and one in the waist mounted NavCube, the effectiveness of step detection through handheld inertial sensors was directly observable.


Design and testing of a multi-sensor pedestrian location and navigation platform.

Morrison A, Renaudin V, Bancroft JB, Lachapelle G - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Pedestrian wearing the NavCube in a backpack with one IMU fixed on each foot and one IMU held in hand.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376552&req=5

f5-sensors-12-03720: Pedestrian wearing the NavCube in a backpack with one IMU fixed on each foot and one IMU held in hand.
Mentions: Five men and five women participated in a 450 m flat test course data collection for conducting gait analysis of pedestrians walking, but only using a handheld inertial sensor. Algorithms for detecting steps, classifying the user’s activity and evaluating step frequency had been developed previously (e.g., [37]). To confirm that the proposed step detection methods based on handheld device were reliably detecting user footfalls in both texting and normal walking modes of use, the NavCube was configured to include a foot mounted IMU. A shown in Figure 5, by placing one ASP on each foot as a step detection reference, in addition to one ASP unit in hand and one in the waist mounted NavCube, the effectiveness of step detection through handheld inertial sensors was directly observable.

Bottom Line: In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required.The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact.Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PLAN Group, Schulich School of Engineering, The University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada. ajmorris@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
Navigation and location technologies are continually advancing, allowing ever higher accuracies and operation under ever more challenging conditions. The development of such technologies requires the rapid evaluation of a large number of sensors and related utilization strategies. The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) with accelerometers, gyros, barometers, magnetometers and other sensors is allowing for novel applications, but is hindered by the difficulties to test and compare integrated solutions using multiple sensor sets. In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required. This paper describes the design and testing of the NavCube, a multi-sensor navigation, location and timing platform. The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact. Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

No MeSH data available.