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Design and testing of a multi-sensor pedestrian location and navigation platform.

Morrison A, Renaudin V, Bancroft JB, Lachapelle G - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required.The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact.Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PLAN Group, Schulich School of Engineering, The University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada. ajmorris@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
Navigation and location technologies are continually advancing, allowing ever higher accuracies and operation under ever more challenging conditions. The development of such technologies requires the rapid evaluation of a large number of sensors and related utilization strategies. The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) with accelerometers, gyros, barometers, magnetometers and other sensors is allowing for novel applications, but is hindered by the difficulties to test and compare integrated solutions using multiple sensor sets. In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required. This paper describes the design and testing of the NavCube, a multi-sensor navigation, location and timing platform. The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact. Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

No MeSH data available.


NavCube system assembled in enclosure. Features are as follows—Element A: 2.4 GHz RF link antenna connectors. Element B: External sensor pod data, power and timing connectors. Element C: Charge connector. Element D: SD card socket (side of enclosure). Element E: Touchscreen. Element F: Indicator lights. Element G: High-Sensitivity GPS/GNSS receiver antenna connections. Element H: Control buttons. Element I: GPS, GLONASS multi-frequency receiver antenna connection.
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f3-sensors-12-03720: NavCube system assembled in enclosure. Features are as follows—Element A: 2.4 GHz RF link antenna connectors. Element B: External sensor pod data, power and timing connectors. Element C: Charge connector. Element D: SD card socket (side of enclosure). Element E: Touchscreen. Element F: Indicator lights. Element G: High-Sensitivity GPS/GNSS receiver antenna connections. Element H: Control buttons. Element I: GPS, GLONASS multi-frequency receiver antenna connection.

Mentions: Not shown in Figure 2 is the removable storage media socket situated between the main circuit board and component A. All data collected by the system is internally synchronized and logged to this removable storage media for post processing. Element B in Figure 2 is identical to the ASP inertial, barometric and magnetic sensor ensemble. Figure 3 shows an external view of the assembled NavCube system installed within a custom laser deposition printed enclosure.


Design and testing of a multi-sensor pedestrian location and navigation platform.

Morrison A, Renaudin V, Bancroft JB, Lachapelle G - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

NavCube system assembled in enclosure. Features are as follows—Element A: 2.4 GHz RF link antenna connectors. Element B: External sensor pod data, power and timing connectors. Element C: Charge connector. Element D: SD card socket (side of enclosure). Element E: Touchscreen. Element F: Indicator lights. Element G: High-Sensitivity GPS/GNSS receiver antenna connections. Element H: Control buttons. Element I: GPS, GLONASS multi-frequency receiver antenna connection.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376552&req=5

f3-sensors-12-03720: NavCube system assembled in enclosure. Features are as follows—Element A: 2.4 GHz RF link antenna connectors. Element B: External sensor pod data, power and timing connectors. Element C: Charge connector. Element D: SD card socket (side of enclosure). Element E: Touchscreen. Element F: Indicator lights. Element G: High-Sensitivity GPS/GNSS receiver antenna connections. Element H: Control buttons. Element I: GPS, GLONASS multi-frequency receiver antenna connection.
Mentions: Not shown in Figure 2 is the removable storage media socket situated between the main circuit board and component A. All data collected by the system is internally synchronized and logged to this removable storage media for post processing. Element B in Figure 2 is identical to the ASP inertial, barometric and magnetic sensor ensemble. Figure 3 shows an external view of the assembled NavCube system installed within a custom laser deposition printed enclosure.

Bottom Line: In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required.The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact.Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PLAN Group, Schulich School of Engineering, The University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada. ajmorris@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
Navigation and location technologies are continually advancing, allowing ever higher accuracies and operation under ever more challenging conditions. The development of such technologies requires the rapid evaluation of a large number of sensors and related utilization strategies. The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) with accelerometers, gyros, barometers, magnetometers and other sensors is allowing for novel applications, but is hindered by the difficulties to test and compare integrated solutions using multiple sensor sets. In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required. This paper describes the design and testing of the NavCube, a multi-sensor navigation, location and timing platform. The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact. Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

No MeSH data available.