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Design and testing of a multi-sensor pedestrian location and navigation platform.

Morrison A, Renaudin V, Bancroft JB, Lachapelle G - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required.The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact.Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PLAN Group, Schulich School of Engineering, The University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada. ajmorris@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
Navigation and location technologies are continually advancing, allowing ever higher accuracies and operation under ever more challenging conditions. The development of such technologies requires the rapid evaluation of a large number of sensors and related utilization strategies. The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) with accelerometers, gyros, barometers, magnetometers and other sensors is allowing for novel applications, but is hindered by the difficulties to test and compare integrated solutions using multiple sensor sets. In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required. This paper describes the design and testing of the NavCube, a multi-sensor navigation, location and timing platform. The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact. Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Biased and distorted magnetic field observations (blue) are calibrated resulting in the nearly ideal observation sphere (cyan) for the magnetometers embedded in IMUs attached to the left foot (a), the right foot (b) and the shoulder (c).
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f12-sensors-12-03720: Biased and distorted magnetic field observations (blue) are calibrated resulting in the nearly ideal observation sphere (cyan) for the magnetometers embedded in IMUs attached to the left foot (a), the right foot (b) and the shoulder (c).

Mentions: Using the NavCube, it is possible to compare the calibration results of different magnetometers mounted on body. In Figure 12, calibrated and non-calibrated magnetic field measurements are shown for the left foot (a), the right foot (b) and the shoulder (c), respectively. When visualized in the vector space, ideal magnetic field measurements shape a perfectly spherical representation of a constant local field centered at the origin, however due to errors, the surface is an ellipsoid not centered at the origin. As it can be observed in Figure 12, even with all sensors carried by the same hiker, the perturbation effect is unique for each magnetometer. This is due to individual fabrication issues but more specifically to surrounding ferromagnetic compounds, for example metallic parts in the shoes. In Figure 13, a comparison of the norm of the measured local magnetic field magnitude in a calibrated (green) versus un-calibrated (red) magnetometer is given. Although the raw data is totally different for the three IMUs, the apparent field magnitude fluctuations are removed for all sensors leading to the norm of the Earth magnetic field extracted from the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF).


Design and testing of a multi-sensor pedestrian location and navigation platform.

Morrison A, Renaudin V, Bancroft JB, Lachapelle G - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Biased and distorted magnetic field observations (blue) are calibrated resulting in the nearly ideal observation sphere (cyan) for the magnetometers embedded in IMUs attached to the left foot (a), the right foot (b) and the shoulder (c).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376552&req=5

f12-sensors-12-03720: Biased and distorted magnetic field observations (blue) are calibrated resulting in the nearly ideal observation sphere (cyan) for the magnetometers embedded in IMUs attached to the left foot (a), the right foot (b) and the shoulder (c).
Mentions: Using the NavCube, it is possible to compare the calibration results of different magnetometers mounted on body. In Figure 12, calibrated and non-calibrated magnetic field measurements are shown for the left foot (a), the right foot (b) and the shoulder (c), respectively. When visualized in the vector space, ideal magnetic field measurements shape a perfectly spherical representation of a constant local field centered at the origin, however due to errors, the surface is an ellipsoid not centered at the origin. As it can be observed in Figure 12, even with all sensors carried by the same hiker, the perturbation effect is unique for each magnetometer. This is due to individual fabrication issues but more specifically to surrounding ferromagnetic compounds, for example metallic parts in the shoes. In Figure 13, a comparison of the norm of the measured local magnetic field magnitude in a calibrated (green) versus un-calibrated (red) magnetometer is given. Although the raw data is totally different for the three IMUs, the apparent field magnitude fluctuations are removed for all sensors leading to the norm of the Earth magnetic field extracted from the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF).

Bottom Line: In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required.The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact.Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PLAN Group, Schulich School of Engineering, The University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada. ajmorris@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
Navigation and location technologies are continually advancing, allowing ever higher accuracies and operation under ever more challenging conditions. The development of such technologies requires the rapid evaluation of a large number of sensors and related utilization strategies. The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) with accelerometers, gyros, barometers, magnetometers and other sensors is allowing for novel applications, but is hindered by the difficulties to test and compare integrated solutions using multiple sensor sets. In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required. This paper describes the design and testing of the NavCube, a multi-sensor navigation, location and timing platform. The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact. Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus