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Design and testing of a multi-sensor pedestrian location and navigation platform.

Morrison A, Renaudin V, Bancroft JB, Lachapelle G - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Bottom Line: In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required.The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact.Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PLAN Group, Schulich School of Engineering, The University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada. ajmorris@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
Navigation and location technologies are continually advancing, allowing ever higher accuracies and operation under ever more challenging conditions. The development of such technologies requires the rapid evaluation of a large number of sensors and related utilization strategies. The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) with accelerometers, gyros, barometers, magnetometers and other sensors is allowing for novel applications, but is hindered by the difficulties to test and compare integrated solutions using multiple sensor sets. In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required. This paper describes the design and testing of the NavCube, a multi-sensor navigation, location and timing platform. The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact. Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

No MeSH data available.


Hiker’s Average Displacement at Various Sensor Locations during each Step.
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f10-sensors-12-03720: Hiker’s Average Displacement at Various Sensor Locations during each Step.

Mentions: The hiker hiked 3.5 km and ascended 700 m vertically in 68 min and took approximately 2,750 steps (one step is from heel lift to heel lift of the same foot). Each step length and velocity was averaged to determine a nominal step profile and is shown in Figures 10 and 11. The left foot was used to determine the start and end of each step. Figure 10 shows the displacement of each ASP, both horizontally and vertically. Each profile varies slightly due to uncorrectable errors, but these errors are limited to a few centimetres. It can be derived from this figure that the hiker has an average step height of 29 and 30 cm and a step length of 119 and 121 cm for the left and right feet while hiking. The back and shoulder sensors are in close agreement, but vary likely due to the user bending forward at steeper inclines.


Design and testing of a multi-sensor pedestrian location and navigation platform.

Morrison A, Renaudin V, Bancroft JB, Lachapelle G - Sensors (Basel) (2012)

Hiker’s Average Displacement at Various Sensor Locations during each Step.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376552&req=5

f10-sensors-12-03720: Hiker’s Average Displacement at Various Sensor Locations during each Step.
Mentions: The hiker hiked 3.5 km and ascended 700 m vertically in 68 min and took approximately 2,750 steps (one step is from heel lift to heel lift of the same foot). Each step length and velocity was averaged to determine a nominal step profile and is shown in Figures 10 and 11. The left foot was used to determine the start and end of each step. Figure 10 shows the displacement of each ASP, both horizontally and vertically. Each profile varies slightly due to uncorrectable errors, but these errors are limited to a few centimetres. It can be derived from this figure that the hiker has an average step height of 29 and 30 cm and a step length of 119 and 121 cm for the left and right feet while hiking. The back and shoulder sensors are in close agreement, but vary likely due to the user bending forward at steeper inclines.

Bottom Line: In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required.The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact.Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PLAN Group, Schulich School of Engineering, The University of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada. ajmorris@ucalgary.ca

ABSTRACT
Navigation and location technologies are continually advancing, allowing ever higher accuracies and operation under ever more challenging conditions. The development of such technologies requires the rapid evaluation of a large number of sensors and related utilization strategies. The integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) with accelerometers, gyros, barometers, magnetometers and other sensors is allowing for novel applications, but is hindered by the difficulties to test and compare integrated solutions using multiple sensor sets. In order to achieve compatibility and flexibility in terms of multiple sensors, an advanced adaptable platform is required. This paper describes the design and testing of the NavCube, a multi-sensor navigation, location and timing platform. The system provides a research tool for pedestrian navigation, location and body motion analysis in an unobtrusive form factor that enables in situ data collections with minimal gait and posture impact. Testing and examples of applications of the NavCube are provided.

No MeSH data available.