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Design of a website on nutrition and physical activity for adolescents: results from formative research.

Thompson D, Cullen KW, Boushey C, Konzelmann K - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

Bottom Line: Teens do not meet guidelines for healthy eating and physical activity.The Internet may be an effective method for delivering programs that help them adopt healthy behaviors.It is critical that members of the target audience be included in formative research to develop behavior change programs that are relevant, appealing, and address their needs and interests.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. dit@bcm.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: Teens do not meet guidelines for healthy eating and physical activity. The Internet may be an effective method for delivering programs that help them adopt healthy behaviors.

Objective: To collect information to design content and structure for a teen-friendly website promoting healthy eating and physical activity behaviors.

Methods: Qualitative research, encompassing both focus group and interview techniques, were used to design the website. Participants were 12-17 year olds in Houston, Texas, and West Lafayette, Indiana.

Results: A total of 133 participants took part in 26 focus groups while 15 participated in one-on-one interviews to provide guidance for the development of teen-friendly content and structure for an online behavior change program promoting healthy eating and physical activity to 12-17 year olds. The youth made suggestions to overcome common barriers to healthy eating and physical activity. Their feedback was used to develop "Teen Choice: Food & Fitness," a 12-week online behavior change program, populated by 4 cartoon character role models.

Conclusions: It is critical that members of the target audience be included in formative research to develop behavior change programs that are relevant, appealing, and address their needs and interests.

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“Did You Know” screenshot showing topics.
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figure4: “Did You Know” screenshot showing topics.

Mentions: The name selected by participants for the 12-week online behavior change program was “Teen Choice: Food & Fitness.” The online program contains an initial log-on page where teens enter their unique username and password to log on to the program website that is hosted on a secure server. Once on the website, they can view the 12 role model stories addressing barriers to healthy eating (n = 6) and physical activity (n = 6) (Figure 1) led by 4 teenage cartoon characters (ie, role models) (Figure 2). Figures 3 and 4 show screenshots of the recipes for teens and parents (“Teen Kitchen”) and the nutrition and physical activity information sections (“Did You Know?”) created in response to focus group discussions. Figure 5 shows the healthy eating calculator. In addition, teens can access a refereed blog, set goals, make plans to help them attain their goal, track their progress online, report goal attainment, and participate in problem-solving activities.


Design of a website on nutrition and physical activity for adolescents: results from formative research.

Thompson D, Cullen KW, Boushey C, Konzelmann K - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

“Did You Know” screenshot showing topics.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376527&req=5

figure4: “Did You Know” screenshot showing topics.
Mentions: The name selected by participants for the 12-week online behavior change program was “Teen Choice: Food & Fitness.” The online program contains an initial log-on page where teens enter their unique username and password to log on to the program website that is hosted on a secure server. Once on the website, they can view the 12 role model stories addressing barriers to healthy eating (n = 6) and physical activity (n = 6) (Figure 1) led by 4 teenage cartoon characters (ie, role models) (Figure 2). Figures 3 and 4 show screenshots of the recipes for teens and parents (“Teen Kitchen”) and the nutrition and physical activity information sections (“Did You Know?”) created in response to focus group discussions. Figure 5 shows the healthy eating calculator. In addition, teens can access a refereed blog, set goals, make plans to help them attain their goal, track their progress online, report goal attainment, and participate in problem-solving activities.

Bottom Line: Teens do not meet guidelines for healthy eating and physical activity.The Internet may be an effective method for delivering programs that help them adopt healthy behaviors.It is critical that members of the target audience be included in formative research to develop behavior change programs that are relevant, appealing, and address their needs and interests.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. dit@bcm.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: Teens do not meet guidelines for healthy eating and physical activity. The Internet may be an effective method for delivering programs that help them adopt healthy behaviors.

Objective: To collect information to design content and structure for a teen-friendly website promoting healthy eating and physical activity behaviors.

Methods: Qualitative research, encompassing both focus group and interview techniques, were used to design the website. Participants were 12-17 year olds in Houston, Texas, and West Lafayette, Indiana.

Results: A total of 133 participants took part in 26 focus groups while 15 participated in one-on-one interviews to provide guidance for the development of teen-friendly content and structure for an online behavior change program promoting healthy eating and physical activity to 12-17 year olds. The youth made suggestions to overcome common barriers to healthy eating and physical activity. Their feedback was used to develop "Teen Choice: Food & Fitness," a 12-week online behavior change program, populated by 4 cartoon character role models.

Conclusions: It is critical that members of the target audience be included in formative research to develop behavior change programs that are relevant, appealing, and address their needs and interests.

Show MeSH