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Health care professionals' beliefs about using wiki-based reminders to promote best practices in trauma care.

Archambault PM, Bilodeau A, Gagnon MP, Aubin K, Lavoie A, Lapointe J, Poitras J, Croteau S, Pham-Dinh M, Légaré F - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

Bottom Line: Wikis are knowledge translation tools that could help health professionals implement best practices in acute care.Little is known about the factors influencing professionals' use of wikis.We noted no other significant differences.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre de santé et de services sociaux Alphonse-Desjardins (Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire de Lévis), Lévis, QC, Canada. patrick.m.archambault@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Wikis are knowledge translation tools that could help health professionals implement best practices in acute care. Little is known about the factors influencing professionals' use of wikis.

Objectives: To identify and compare the beliefs of emergency physicians (EPs) and allied health professionals (AHPs) about using a wiki-based reminder that promotes evidence-based care for traumatic brain injuries.

Methods: Drawing on the theory of planned behavior, we conducted semistructured interviews to elicit EPs' and AHPs' beliefs about using a wiki-based reminder. Previous studies suggested a sample of 25 EPs and 25 AHPs. We purposefully selected participants from three trauma centers in Quebec, Canada, to obtain a representative sample. Using univariate analyses, we assessed whether our participants' gender, age, and level of experience were similar to those of all eligible individuals. Participants viewed a video showing a clinician using a wiki-based reminder, and we interviewed participants about their behavioral, control, and normative beliefs-that is, what they saw as advantages, disadvantages, barriers, and facilitators to their use of a reminder, and how they felt important referents would perceive their use of a reminder. Two reviewers independently analyzed the content of the interview transcripts. We considered the 75% most frequently mentioned beliefs as salient. We retained some less frequently mentioned beliefs as well.

Results: Of 66 eligible EPs and 444 eligible AHPs, we invited 55 EPs and 39 AHPs to participate, and 25 EPs and 25 AHPs (15 nurses, 7 respiratory therapists, and 3 pharmacists) accepted. Participating AHPs had more experience than eligible AHPs (mean 14 vs 11 years; P = .04). We noted no other significant differences. Among EPs, the most frequently reported advantage of using a wiki-based reminder was that it refreshes the memory (n = 14); among AHPs, it was that it provides rapid access to protocols (n = 16). Only 2 EPs mentioned a disadvantage (the wiki added stress). The most frequently reported favorable referent was nurses for EPs (n = 16) and EPs for AHPs (n = 19). The most frequently reported unfavorable referents were people resistant to standardized care for EPs (n = 8) and people less comfortable with computers for AHPs (n = 11). The most frequent facilitator for EPs was ease of use (n = 19); for AHPs, it was having a bedside computer (n = 20). EPs' most frequently reported barrier was irregularly updated wiki-based reminders (n = 18); AHPs' was undetermined legal responsibility (n = 10).

Conclusions: We identified EPs' and AHPs' salient beliefs about using a wiki-based reminder. We will draw on these beliefs to construct a questionnaire to measure the importance of these determinants to EPs' and AHPs' intention to use a wiki-based reminder promoting evidence-based care for traumatic brain injuries.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Theoretical framework of the theory of planned behavior.
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figure1: Theoretical framework of the theory of planned behavior.

Mentions: The theory of planned behavior (Figure 1 [45,46]) is well known for its application to the study of health care professionals’ behaviors [47-56]. A recent systematic review has shown that Internet-based interventions based on the theory of planned behavior tend to have substantial effects on behavior [57]. This theory provides a theoretical account of the ways in which attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control combine to predict behavioral intention [55]. It postulates that when an individual has some control over a situation, intention is the immediate determinant of behavior [45]. Furthermore, if the individual’s perceived behavioral control reflects the individual’s actual behavioral control, this variable can be used to predict behavior directly.


Health care professionals' beliefs about using wiki-based reminders to promote best practices in trauma care.

Archambault PM, Bilodeau A, Gagnon MP, Aubin K, Lavoie A, Lapointe J, Poitras J, Croteau S, Pham-Dinh M, Légaré F - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

Theoretical framework of the theory of planned behavior.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376518&req=5

figure1: Theoretical framework of the theory of planned behavior.
Mentions: The theory of planned behavior (Figure 1 [45,46]) is well known for its application to the study of health care professionals’ behaviors [47-56]. A recent systematic review has shown that Internet-based interventions based on the theory of planned behavior tend to have substantial effects on behavior [57]. This theory provides a theoretical account of the ways in which attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control combine to predict behavioral intention [55]. It postulates that when an individual has some control over a situation, intention is the immediate determinant of behavior [45]. Furthermore, if the individual’s perceived behavioral control reflects the individual’s actual behavioral control, this variable can be used to predict behavior directly.

Bottom Line: Wikis are knowledge translation tools that could help health professionals implement best practices in acute care.Little is known about the factors influencing professionals' use of wikis.We noted no other significant differences.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre de santé et de services sociaux Alphonse-Desjardins (Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire de Lévis), Lévis, QC, Canada. patrick.m.archambault@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Wikis are knowledge translation tools that could help health professionals implement best practices in acute care. Little is known about the factors influencing professionals' use of wikis.

Objectives: To identify and compare the beliefs of emergency physicians (EPs) and allied health professionals (AHPs) about using a wiki-based reminder that promotes evidence-based care for traumatic brain injuries.

Methods: Drawing on the theory of planned behavior, we conducted semistructured interviews to elicit EPs' and AHPs' beliefs about using a wiki-based reminder. Previous studies suggested a sample of 25 EPs and 25 AHPs. We purposefully selected participants from three trauma centers in Quebec, Canada, to obtain a representative sample. Using univariate analyses, we assessed whether our participants' gender, age, and level of experience were similar to those of all eligible individuals. Participants viewed a video showing a clinician using a wiki-based reminder, and we interviewed participants about their behavioral, control, and normative beliefs-that is, what they saw as advantages, disadvantages, barriers, and facilitators to their use of a reminder, and how they felt important referents would perceive their use of a reminder. Two reviewers independently analyzed the content of the interview transcripts. We considered the 75% most frequently mentioned beliefs as salient. We retained some less frequently mentioned beliefs as well.

Results: Of 66 eligible EPs and 444 eligible AHPs, we invited 55 EPs and 39 AHPs to participate, and 25 EPs and 25 AHPs (15 nurses, 7 respiratory therapists, and 3 pharmacists) accepted. Participating AHPs had more experience than eligible AHPs (mean 14 vs 11 years; P = .04). We noted no other significant differences. Among EPs, the most frequently reported advantage of using a wiki-based reminder was that it refreshes the memory (n = 14); among AHPs, it was that it provides rapid access to protocols (n = 16). Only 2 EPs mentioned a disadvantage (the wiki added stress). The most frequently reported favorable referent was nurses for EPs (n = 16) and EPs for AHPs (n = 19). The most frequently reported unfavorable referents were people resistant to standardized care for EPs (n = 8) and people less comfortable with computers for AHPs (n = 11). The most frequent facilitator for EPs was ease of use (n = 19); for AHPs, it was having a bedside computer (n = 20). EPs' most frequently reported barrier was irregularly updated wiki-based reminders (n = 18); AHPs' was undetermined legal responsibility (n = 10).

Conclusions: We identified EPs' and AHPs' salient beliefs about using a wiki-based reminder. We will draw on these beliefs to construct a questionnaire to measure the importance of these determinants to EPs' and AHPs' intention to use a wiki-based reminder promoting evidence-based care for traumatic brain injuries.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus