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Using smartphone technology to monitor physical activity in the 10,000 Steps program: a matched case-control trial.

Kirwan M, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Mummery WK - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

Bottom Line: Website-delivered physical activity interventions are successful in producing short-term behavior change.Over the study period (90 days), the intervention group logged steps on an average of 62 days, compared with 41 days in the matched group.Additionally, use of the application was associated with an increased likelihood to log greater than 10,000 steps on each entry (odds ratio 20.64, 95% confidence interval 9.19-46.39).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Physical Activity Studies, Institute for Health and Social Sciences Research, CQUniversity, North Rockhampton, Australia. m.kirwan@cqu.edu.au

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Procedure for intervention participants to upload their daily steps to the 10,000 Steps Web server.
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figure2: Procedure for intervention participants to upload their daily steps to the 10,000 Steps Web server.

Mentions: After providing informed consent, the intervention group received the iStepLog application, to use on their own iPhone or iPod touch for 3 months. Participants in the intervention group were emailed an attachment with the iStepLog application, with instructions on how to install it on their smartphone. Over the course of the 3-month intervention (August to October 2009), these participants were able to log their steps either by using the iStepLog application on their device or by using the 10,000 Steps website (see Figure 2). Intervention participants were free to use either technology as they preferred; we did not require participants to continue to use the website during the intervention. Immediately following the study, we asked the intervention participants to complete a 10-item questionnaire concerning the usability and usefulness of the iStepLog application (see Table 1).


Using smartphone technology to monitor physical activity in the 10,000 Steps program: a matched case-control trial.

Kirwan M, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Mummery WK - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

Procedure for intervention participants to upload their daily steps to the 10,000 Steps Web server.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376516&req=5

figure2: Procedure for intervention participants to upload their daily steps to the 10,000 Steps Web server.
Mentions: After providing informed consent, the intervention group received the iStepLog application, to use on their own iPhone or iPod touch for 3 months. Participants in the intervention group were emailed an attachment with the iStepLog application, with instructions on how to install it on their smartphone. Over the course of the 3-month intervention (August to October 2009), these participants were able to log their steps either by using the iStepLog application on their device or by using the 10,000 Steps website (see Figure 2). Intervention participants were free to use either technology as they preferred; we did not require participants to continue to use the website during the intervention. Immediately following the study, we asked the intervention participants to complete a 10-item questionnaire concerning the usability and usefulness of the iStepLog application (see Table 1).

Bottom Line: Website-delivered physical activity interventions are successful in producing short-term behavior change.Over the study period (90 days), the intervention group logged steps on an average of 62 days, compared with 41 days in the matched group.Additionally, use of the application was associated with an increased likelihood to log greater than 10,000 steps on each entry (odds ratio 20.64, 95% confidence interval 9.19-46.39).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Physical Activity Studies, Institute for Health and Social Sciences Research, CQUniversity, North Rockhampton, Australia. m.kirwan@cqu.edu.au

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus