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Using smartphone technology to monitor physical activity in the 10,000 Steps program: a matched case-control trial.

Kirwan M, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Mummery WK - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

Bottom Line: Website-delivered physical activity interventions are successful in producing short-term behavior change.Over the study period (90 days), the intervention group logged steps on an average of 62 days, compared with 41 days in the matched group.Additionally, use of the application was associated with an increased likelihood to log greater than 10,000 steps on each entry (odds ratio 20.64, 95% confidence interval 9.19-46.39).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Physical Activity Studies, Institute for Health and Social Sciences Research, CQUniversity, North Rockhampton, Australia. m.kirwan@cqu.edu.au

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Design of iStepLog application. Top, left to right: login screen, step log screen, enter steps screen. Bottom, left to right: review steps screen, sync to Web screen, syncing screen.
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figure1: Design of iStepLog application. Top, left to right: login screen, step log screen, enter steps screen. Bottom, left to right: review steps screen, sync to Web screen, syncing screen.

Mentions: The iStepLog application was designed to allow members of the 10,000 Steps program to record their daily physical activity levels on their mobile device and synchronize this information with their online Step Log (see Figure 1). Built-in tracking software was integrated into the application to allow researchers to monitor how much time participants spent using the application, how often they used the application to log steps, and which features of the application were most popular. Prior to this research, 10,000 Steps staff conducted a laboratory-based usability study using qualitative and quantitative measures to systematically improve the usability of the design of the iStepLog application. The outcomes of this research revealed that improvements to the iStepLog application in both aesthetic design and functionality resulted in increased performance of the application, in terms of both efficiency of use and a decreased number of problems experienced by users.


Using smartphone technology to monitor physical activity in the 10,000 Steps program: a matched case-control trial.

Kirwan M, Duncan MJ, Vandelanotte C, Mummery WK - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

Design of iStepLog application. Top, left to right: login screen, step log screen, enter steps screen. Bottom, left to right: review steps screen, sync to Web screen, syncing screen.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376516&req=5

figure1: Design of iStepLog application. Top, left to right: login screen, step log screen, enter steps screen. Bottom, left to right: review steps screen, sync to Web screen, syncing screen.
Mentions: The iStepLog application was designed to allow members of the 10,000 Steps program to record their daily physical activity levels on their mobile device and synchronize this information with their online Step Log (see Figure 1). Built-in tracking software was integrated into the application to allow researchers to monitor how much time participants spent using the application, how often they used the application to log steps, and which features of the application were most popular. Prior to this research, 10,000 Steps staff conducted a laboratory-based usability study using qualitative and quantitative measures to systematically improve the usability of the design of the iStepLog application. The outcomes of this research revealed that improvements to the iStepLog application in both aesthetic design and functionality resulted in increased performance of the application, in terms of both efficiency of use and a decreased number of problems experienced by users.

Bottom Line: Website-delivered physical activity interventions are successful in producing short-term behavior change.Over the study period (90 days), the intervention group logged steps on an average of 62 days, compared with 41 days in the matched group.Additionally, use of the application was associated with an increased likelihood to log greater than 10,000 steps on each entry (odds ratio 20.64, 95% confidence interval 9.19-46.39).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Physical Activity Studies, Institute for Health and Social Sciences Research, CQUniversity, North Rockhampton, Australia. m.kirwan@cqu.edu.au

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus