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Web-based, computer-tailored, pedometer-based physical activity advice: development, dissemination through general practice, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy in a randomized controlled trial.

De Cocker K, Spittaels H, Cardon G, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Vandelanotte C - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

Bottom Line: In the tailored condition, 30/43 (70%) participants requested the computer-tailored step advice and the majority found it understandable (21/21, 100%), credible (17/18, 94%), relevant (15/18, 83%), not too long (13/18, 72%), instructive (13/18, 72%), and encouraging to increase steps (16/24, 67%).No interaction or other time effects were found.However, in this selected sample of adults, the tailored condition did not show superior effects compared with the standard condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Ghent University, Watersportlaan 2, Ghent, Belgium. Katrien.DeCocker@ugent.be

ABSTRACT

Background: Computer tailoring is a relatively innovative and promising physical activity intervention approach. However, few computer-tailored physical activity interventions in adults have provided feedback based on pedometer use.

Objectives: To (1) describe the development of a Web-based, pedometer-based, computer-tailored step advice intervention, (2) report on the dissemination of this tool through general practice, (3) report on its perceived acceptability, and (4) evaluate the preliminary efficacy of this tool in comparison with a standard intervention.

Methods: We recruited 92 participants through general practitioners and randomly assigned them to a standard condition (receiving a pedometer-only intervention, n = 47) and a tailored condition (receiving a pedometer plus newly developed, automated, computer-tailored step advice intervention, n = 45). Step counts, self-reported data obtained via telephone interview on physical activity, time spent sitting, and body mass index were assessed at baseline and postintervention. The present sample was mostly female (54/92, 59%), highly educated (59/92, 64%), employed (65/92, 71%), and in good health (62/92, 67%).

Results: Recruitment through general practitioners was poor (n = 107, initial response rate 107/1737, 6.2%); however, the majority of participants (50/69, 73%) believed it is useful that general practitioners help patients find ways to increase physical activity. In the tailored condition, 30/43 (70%) participants requested the computer-tailored step advice and the majority found it understandable (21/21, 100%), credible (17/18, 94%), relevant (15/18, 83%), not too long (13/18, 72%), instructive (13/18, 72%), and encouraging to increase steps (16/24, 67%). Daily step counts increased from baseline (mean 9237, SD 3749 steps/day) to postintervention (mean 11,876, SD 4574 steps/day) in the total sample (change of 2639, 95% confidence interval 105-5172; F(1 )= 5.0, P = .04). No interaction or other time effects were found.

Conclusions: The majority of participants in the tailored condition accepted the step advice and indicated it was useful. However, in this selected sample of adults, the tailored condition did not show superior effects compared with the standard condition.

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Flow of participants through the study. GP = general practitioner.
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figure1: Flow of participants through the study. GP = general practitioner.

Mentions: From the 1900 available invitation letters (50 per GP, 38 GPs), 1737 letters were handed out to patients. A total of 107 individuals expressed an interest in participating (response rate 6.2%); however, 1 participant did not meet the inclusion criteria and 7 eventually withdrew for family- or work-related reasons, leaving 99 participants at baseline (see Figure 1). The baseline interview (completed by 92 participants) showed that 89 participants had received the invitation letter from their GP, 1 person found it in the waiting room, 1 received it from his wife, and 1 received it from a parent. At postintervention (interview completed by 69 participants), the majority believed that it is useful to very useful that GPs emphasize the importance of sufficient physical activity (61/69, 88%), that it is useful to very useful for GPs to offer pedometers to their patients (61/69, 88%), and that it is useful to very useful for GPs to help patients find ways to increase physical activity (50/69, 73%).


Web-based, computer-tailored, pedometer-based physical activity advice: development, dissemination through general practice, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy in a randomized controlled trial.

De Cocker K, Spittaels H, Cardon G, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Vandelanotte C - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

Flow of participants through the study. GP = general practitioner.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376513&req=5

figure1: Flow of participants through the study. GP = general practitioner.
Mentions: From the 1900 available invitation letters (50 per GP, 38 GPs), 1737 letters were handed out to patients. A total of 107 individuals expressed an interest in participating (response rate 6.2%); however, 1 participant did not meet the inclusion criteria and 7 eventually withdrew for family- or work-related reasons, leaving 99 participants at baseline (see Figure 1). The baseline interview (completed by 92 participants) showed that 89 participants had received the invitation letter from their GP, 1 person found it in the waiting room, 1 received it from his wife, and 1 received it from a parent. At postintervention (interview completed by 69 participants), the majority believed that it is useful to very useful that GPs emphasize the importance of sufficient physical activity (61/69, 88%), that it is useful to very useful for GPs to offer pedometers to their patients (61/69, 88%), and that it is useful to very useful for GPs to help patients find ways to increase physical activity (50/69, 73%).

Bottom Line: In the tailored condition, 30/43 (70%) participants requested the computer-tailored step advice and the majority found it understandable (21/21, 100%), credible (17/18, 94%), relevant (15/18, 83%), not too long (13/18, 72%), instructive (13/18, 72%), and encouraging to increase steps (16/24, 67%).No interaction or other time effects were found.However, in this selected sample of adults, the tailored condition did not show superior effects compared with the standard condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Ghent University, Watersportlaan 2, Ghent, Belgium. Katrien.DeCocker@ugent.be

ABSTRACT

Background: Computer tailoring is a relatively innovative and promising physical activity intervention approach. However, few computer-tailored physical activity interventions in adults have provided feedback based on pedometer use.

Objectives: To (1) describe the development of a Web-based, pedometer-based, computer-tailored step advice intervention, (2) report on the dissemination of this tool through general practice, (3) report on its perceived acceptability, and (4) evaluate the preliminary efficacy of this tool in comparison with a standard intervention.

Methods: We recruited 92 participants through general practitioners and randomly assigned them to a standard condition (receiving a pedometer-only intervention, n = 47) and a tailored condition (receiving a pedometer plus newly developed, automated, computer-tailored step advice intervention, n = 45). Step counts, self-reported data obtained via telephone interview on physical activity, time spent sitting, and body mass index were assessed at baseline and postintervention. The present sample was mostly female (54/92, 59%), highly educated (59/92, 64%), employed (65/92, 71%), and in good health (62/92, 67%).

Results: Recruitment through general practitioners was poor (n = 107, initial response rate 107/1737, 6.2%); however, the majority of participants (50/69, 73%) believed it is useful that general practitioners help patients find ways to increase physical activity. In the tailored condition, 30/43 (70%) participants requested the computer-tailored step advice and the majority found it understandable (21/21, 100%), credible (17/18, 94%), relevant (15/18, 83%), not too long (13/18, 72%), instructive (13/18, 72%), and encouraging to increase steps (16/24, 67%). Daily step counts increased from baseline (mean 9237, SD 3749 steps/day) to postintervention (mean 11,876, SD 4574 steps/day) in the total sample (change of 2639, 95% confidence interval 105-5172; F(1 )= 5.0, P = .04). No interaction or other time effects were found.

Conclusions: The majority of participants in the tailored condition accepted the step advice and indicated it was useful. However, in this selected sample of adults, the tailored condition did not show superior effects compared with the standard condition.

Show MeSH