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Novel technologies for assessing dietary intake: evaluating the usability of a mobile telephone food record among adults and adolescents.

Daugherty BL, Schap TE, Ettienne-Gittens R, Zhu FM, Bosch M, Delp EJ, Ebert DS, Kerr DA, Boushey CJ - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

Bottom Line: Compared with adolescents, significantly more adults had to capture more than one image before (38% vs 58%, P = .03) and after (25% vs 50%, P = .008) meal session 1 to obtain a suitable image.A majority of both age groups were able to follow the defined set of skills; however, adults were less efficient when using the mobile telephone food record.Additional interactive training will likely be necessary for all users to provide extra practice in capturing images before entering a free-living situation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Purdue University, West Lafayatte, IN, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: The development of a mobile telephone food record has the potential to ameliorate much of the burden associated with current methods of dietary assessment. When using the mobile telephone food record, respondents capture an image of their foods and beverages before and after eating. Methods of image analysis and volume estimation allow for automatic identification and volume estimation of foods. To obtain a suitable image, all foods and beverages and a fiducial marker must be included in the image.

Objective: To evaluate a defined set of skills among adolescents and adults when using the mobile telephone food record to capture images and to compare the perceptions and preferences between adults and adolescents regarding their use of the mobile telephone food record.

Methods: We recruited 135 volunteers (78 adolescents, 57 adults) to use the mobile telephone food record for one or two meals under controlled conditions. Volunteers received instruction for using the mobile telephone food record prior to their first meal, captured images of foods and beverages before and after eating, and participated in a feedback session. We used chi-square for comparisons of the set of skills, preferences, and perceptions between the adults and adolescents, and McNemar test for comparisons within the adolescents and adults.

Results: Adults were more likely than adolescents to include all foods and beverages in the before and after images, but both age groups had difficulty including the entire fiducial marker. Compared with adolescents, significantly more adults had to capture more than one image before (38% vs 58%, P = .03) and after (25% vs 50%, P = .008) meal session 1 to obtain a suitable image. Despite being less efficient when using the mobile telephone food record, adults were more likely than adolescents to perceive remembering to capture images as easy (P < .001).

Conclusions: A majority of both age groups were able to follow the defined set of skills; however, adults were less efficient when using the mobile telephone food record. Additional interactive training will likely be necessary for all users to provide extra practice in capturing images before entering a free-living situation. These results will inform age-specific development of the mobile telephone food record that may translate to a more accurate method of dietary assessment.

Show MeSH
Study design, activities, and measures of participants using the mobile telephone food record. For 15 of the adolescent participants, meal session 2 was later in the same day. For the remainder of participants, meal session 2 occurred on a different day. Adult participants were offered dessert as a separate course. For meal session 1, 39 selected dessert, and for meal session 2, 15 selected dessert.
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figure1: Study design, activities, and measures of participants using the mobile telephone food record. For 15 of the adolescent participants, meal session 2 was later in the same day. For the remainder of participants, meal session 2 occurred on a different day. Adult participants were offered dessert as a separate course. For meal session 1, 39 selected dessert, and for meal session 2, 15 selected dessert.

Mentions: The second adolescent sample was a convenience sample drawn from the local community [31]. A total of 15 participants, ages 11–18 years, received all meals and snacks for a 24-hour period while being monitored under controlled conditions. These participants also took part in the feedback and advanced interactive instruction session after using the mobile telephone food record for meal session 1. Data from their first two meal sessions during the 24-hour period are included in this analysis. Figure 1 shows the data collection flow for the two samples of adolescents.


Novel technologies for assessing dietary intake: evaluating the usability of a mobile telephone food record among adults and adolescents.

Daugherty BL, Schap TE, Ettienne-Gittens R, Zhu FM, Bosch M, Delp EJ, Ebert DS, Kerr DA, Boushey CJ - J. Med. Internet Res. (2012)

Study design, activities, and measures of participants using the mobile telephone food record. For 15 of the adolescent participants, meal session 2 was later in the same day. For the remainder of participants, meal session 2 occurred on a different day. Adult participants were offered dessert as a separate course. For meal session 1, 39 selected dessert, and for meal session 2, 15 selected dessert.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376510&req=5

figure1: Study design, activities, and measures of participants using the mobile telephone food record. For 15 of the adolescent participants, meal session 2 was later in the same day. For the remainder of participants, meal session 2 occurred on a different day. Adult participants were offered dessert as a separate course. For meal session 1, 39 selected dessert, and for meal session 2, 15 selected dessert.
Mentions: The second adolescent sample was a convenience sample drawn from the local community [31]. A total of 15 participants, ages 11–18 years, received all meals and snacks for a 24-hour period while being monitored under controlled conditions. These participants also took part in the feedback and advanced interactive instruction session after using the mobile telephone food record for meal session 1. Data from their first two meal sessions during the 24-hour period are included in this analysis. Figure 1 shows the data collection flow for the two samples of adolescents.

Bottom Line: Compared with adolescents, significantly more adults had to capture more than one image before (38% vs 58%, P = .03) and after (25% vs 50%, P = .008) meal session 1 to obtain a suitable image.A majority of both age groups were able to follow the defined set of skills; however, adults were less efficient when using the mobile telephone food record.Additional interactive training will likely be necessary for all users to provide extra practice in capturing images before entering a free-living situation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Purdue University, West Lafayatte, IN, United States.

ABSTRACT

Background: The development of a mobile telephone food record has the potential to ameliorate much of the burden associated with current methods of dietary assessment. When using the mobile telephone food record, respondents capture an image of their foods and beverages before and after eating. Methods of image analysis and volume estimation allow for automatic identification and volume estimation of foods. To obtain a suitable image, all foods and beverages and a fiducial marker must be included in the image.

Objective: To evaluate a defined set of skills among adolescents and adults when using the mobile telephone food record to capture images and to compare the perceptions and preferences between adults and adolescents regarding their use of the mobile telephone food record.

Methods: We recruited 135 volunteers (78 adolescents, 57 adults) to use the mobile telephone food record for one or two meals under controlled conditions. Volunteers received instruction for using the mobile telephone food record prior to their first meal, captured images of foods and beverages before and after eating, and participated in a feedback session. We used chi-square for comparisons of the set of skills, preferences, and perceptions between the adults and adolescents, and McNemar test for comparisons within the adolescents and adults.

Results: Adults were more likely than adolescents to include all foods and beverages in the before and after images, but both age groups had difficulty including the entire fiducial marker. Compared with adolescents, significantly more adults had to capture more than one image before (38% vs 58%, P = .03) and after (25% vs 50%, P = .008) meal session 1 to obtain a suitable image. Despite being less efficient when using the mobile telephone food record, adults were more likely than adolescents to perceive remembering to capture images as easy (P < .001).

Conclusions: A majority of both age groups were able to follow the defined set of skills; however, adults were less efficient when using the mobile telephone food record. Additional interactive training will likely be necessary for all users to provide extra practice in capturing images before entering a free-living situation. These results will inform age-specific development of the mobile telephone food record that may translate to a more accurate method of dietary assessment.

Show MeSH