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But I trust my teen: parents' attitudes and response to a parental monitoring intervention.

Metzger A, Ice C, Cottrell L - AIDS Res Treat (2012)

Bottom Line: Similar effects were found in both the intervention and control group models regarding open communication.In the intervention group, parents' beliefs about the importance of trust and privacy were associated with a steeper decline in monitoring across time.Finally, parents' attitudes about the normative nature of teen experimentation were associated with a quadratic parental monitoring time trend in the intervention but not the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, West Virginia University, 1124 Life Sciences Building, Morgantown, WV 26506-6040, USA.

ABSTRACT
Parental knowledge gained from monitoring activities protects against adolescent risk involvement. Parental monitoring approaches are varied and may be modified with successful interventions but not all parents or adolescents respond to monitoring programs the same way. 339 parent-adolescent dyads randomized to receive a parental monitoring intervention and 169 parent-adolescent dyads in the control group were followed for one year over four measurement periods. Parent attitudes about the usefulness of monitoring, the importance of trust and respecting their teens' privacy, and the appropriateness of adolescent risk-taking behavior and experimentation were examined as predictors of longitudinal change in parental monitoring and open communication. Similar effects were found in both the intervention and control group models regarding open communication. Parental attitudes impacted longitudinal patterns of teen-reported parent monitoring, and these patterns differed across experimental groups. In the intervention group, parents' beliefs about the importance of trust and privacy were associated with a steeper decline in monitoring across time. Finally, parents' attitudes about the normative nature of teen experimentation were associated with a quadratic parental monitoring time trend in the intervention but not the control group. These findings suggest that parental attitudes may impact how families respond to an adolescent risk intervention.

No MeSH data available.


Parental open communication slopes at different levels of ATP. ATP: parent attitudes about monitoring and the importance of adolescent trust and privacy.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Parental open communication slopes at different levels of ATP. ATP: parent attitudes about monitoring and the importance of adolescent trust and privacy.

Mentions: Parental beliefs concerning trust in teens and respect for teens' privacy were associated with change in open communication levels over time. Parents who strongly believed trusting their adolescents meant not touching base with them or asking for information from their adolescents reported stable levels of open communication (75th percentile; Figure 1). In contrast, parents who expressed lower levels of trust and respect for their teens' privacy reported a decline in open communication after intervention (25th percentile; Figure 1).


But I trust my teen: parents' attitudes and response to a parental monitoring intervention.

Metzger A, Ice C, Cottrell L - AIDS Res Treat (2012)

Parental open communication slopes at different levels of ATP. ATP: parent attitudes about monitoring and the importance of adolescent trust and privacy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376478&req=5

fig1: Parental open communication slopes at different levels of ATP. ATP: parent attitudes about monitoring and the importance of adolescent trust and privacy.
Mentions: Parental beliefs concerning trust in teens and respect for teens' privacy were associated with change in open communication levels over time. Parents who strongly believed trusting their adolescents meant not touching base with them or asking for information from their adolescents reported stable levels of open communication (75th percentile; Figure 1). In contrast, parents who expressed lower levels of trust and respect for their teens' privacy reported a decline in open communication after intervention (25th percentile; Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Similar effects were found in both the intervention and control group models regarding open communication.In the intervention group, parents' beliefs about the importance of trust and privacy were associated with a steeper decline in monitoring across time.Finally, parents' attitudes about the normative nature of teen experimentation were associated with a quadratic parental monitoring time trend in the intervention but not the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, West Virginia University, 1124 Life Sciences Building, Morgantown, WV 26506-6040, USA.

ABSTRACT
Parental knowledge gained from monitoring activities protects against adolescent risk involvement. Parental monitoring approaches are varied and may be modified with successful interventions but not all parents or adolescents respond to monitoring programs the same way. 339 parent-adolescent dyads randomized to receive a parental monitoring intervention and 169 parent-adolescent dyads in the control group were followed for one year over four measurement periods. Parent attitudes about the usefulness of monitoring, the importance of trust and respecting their teens' privacy, and the appropriateness of adolescent risk-taking behavior and experimentation were examined as predictors of longitudinal change in parental monitoring and open communication. Similar effects were found in both the intervention and control group models regarding open communication. Parental attitudes impacted longitudinal patterns of teen-reported parent monitoring, and these patterns differed across experimental groups. In the intervention group, parents' beliefs about the importance of trust and privacy were associated with a steeper decline in monitoring across time. Finally, parents' attitudes about the normative nature of teen experimentation were associated with a quadratic parental monitoring time trend in the intervention but not the control group. These findings suggest that parental attitudes may impact how families respond to an adolescent risk intervention.

No MeSH data available.