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Intracranial Pressure Monitoring: Invasive versus Non-Invasive Methods-A Review.

Raboel PH, Bartek J, Andresen M, Bellander BM, Romner B - Crit Care Res Pract (2012)

Bottom Line: There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive.The non-invasive techniques are without the invasive methods' risk of complication, but fail to measure ICP accurately enough to be used as routine alternatives to invasive measurement.We conclude that invasive measurement is currently the only option for accurate measurement of ICP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) has been used for decades in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive. This paper aims to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the most common and well-known methods as well as assess whether noninvasive techniques (transcranial Doppler, tympanic membrane displacement, optic nerve sheath diameter, CT scan/MRI and fundoscopy) can be used as reliable alternatives to the invasive techniques (ventriculostomy and microtransducers). Ventriculostomy is considered the gold standard in terms of accurate measurement of pressure, although microtransducers generally are just as accurate. Both invasive techniques are associated with a minor risk of complications such as hemorrhage and infection. Furthermore, zero drift is a problem with selected microtransducers. The non-invasive techniques are without the invasive methods' risk of complication, but fail to measure ICP accurately enough to be used as routine alternatives to invasive measurement. We conclude that invasive measurement is currently the only option for accurate measurement of ICP.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The relationship between intracranial pressure and volume.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: The relationship between intracranial pressure and volume.

Mentions: This relationship provides a compensatory reserve, also called spatial compensation. It is 60–80 mL in young persons and 100–140 mL in elderly, mainly due to cerebral atrophy [7]. The volume/pressure curve is shown in Figure 1.


Intracranial Pressure Monitoring: Invasive versus Non-Invasive Methods-A Review.

Raboel PH, Bartek J, Andresen M, Bellander BM, Romner B - Crit Care Res Pract (2012)

The relationship between intracranial pressure and volume.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376474&req=5

fig1: The relationship between intracranial pressure and volume.
Mentions: This relationship provides a compensatory reserve, also called spatial compensation. It is 60–80 mL in young persons and 100–140 mL in elderly, mainly due to cerebral atrophy [7]. The volume/pressure curve is shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive.The non-invasive techniques are without the invasive methods' risk of complication, but fail to measure ICP accurately enough to be used as routine alternatives to invasive measurement.We conclude that invasive measurement is currently the only option for accurate measurement of ICP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) has been used for decades in the fields of neurosurgery and neurology. There are multiple techniques: invasive as well as noninvasive. This paper aims to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the most common and well-known methods as well as assess whether noninvasive techniques (transcranial Doppler, tympanic membrane displacement, optic nerve sheath diameter, CT scan/MRI and fundoscopy) can be used as reliable alternatives to the invasive techniques (ventriculostomy and microtransducers). Ventriculostomy is considered the gold standard in terms of accurate measurement of pressure, although microtransducers generally are just as accurate. Both invasive techniques are associated with a minor risk of complications such as hemorrhage and infection. Furthermore, zero drift is a problem with selected microtransducers. The non-invasive techniques are without the invasive methods' risk of complication, but fail to measure ICP accurately enough to be used as routine alternatives to invasive measurement. We conclude that invasive measurement is currently the only option for accurate measurement of ICP.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus