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Pleiotropic effects of pitavastatin.

Davignon J - Br J Clin Pharmacol (2012)

Bottom Line: In addition to the direct effects of statins in reducing concentrations of atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), several studies have indicated that the beneficial effects of statins may be due to some of their cholesterol-independent, multiple (pleiotropic) effects which may differ between different members of the class.Pitavastatin is a novel synthetic lipophilic statin that has a number of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties distinct from those of other statins, which may underlie its potential pleiotropic benefits in reducing cardiovascular risk factors.It is concluded that the diverse pleiotropic actions of pitavastatin may contribute to reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality beyond that achieved through LDL-C reduction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hyperlipidemia and Atherosclerosis Research Group, Clinical Research Institute of Montréal (IRCM) and University of Montréal, QC, Canada. Jean.Davignon@ircm.qc.ca

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Increase in endothelial-dependent vasodilation following 1 month of treatment with 2 mg pitavastatin daily in chronic smokers. Endothelial function was assessed noninvasively, using high-resolution ultrasound, by measuring endothelium-dependent and -independent dilation of the brachial artery by reactive hyperaemia and glycerol trinitrate, respectively. *P < 0.05 vs. patients not treated with pitavastatin. Reproduced with permission from Yoshida et al. [49]. FMD, endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation; GTD, endotheliumindependent glycerol trinitrate-induced vasodilatation. Controls (□); Pitavastatin (■)
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fig04: Increase in endothelial-dependent vasodilation following 1 month of treatment with 2 mg pitavastatin daily in chronic smokers. Endothelial function was assessed noninvasively, using high-resolution ultrasound, by measuring endothelium-dependent and -independent dilation of the brachial artery by reactive hyperaemia and glycerol trinitrate, respectively. *P < 0.05 vs. patients not treated with pitavastatin. Reproduced with permission from Yoshida et al. [49]. FMD, endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation; GTD, endotheliumindependent glycerol trinitrate-induced vasodilatation. Controls (□); Pitavastatin (■)

Mentions: The effects of statins on endothelial cells are associated with significant reductions in coronary artery disease (CAD), cerebrovascular disease and peripheral artery disease [3], and improvements in markers of endothelial function are observed during clinical use of pitavastatin. Fasting and postprandial forearm blood flow increased significantly (P < 0.05) during post ischaemic reactive hyperaemia in patients with CAD following 6 months of treatment with pitavastatin, but not in controls (Figure 3) [48]. Vasodilatation of the brachial artery was also increased after short term (2 weeks) treatment with pitavastatin in patients with primary hypercholesterolaemia. This increase was significantly greater in patients treated with pitavastatin (n= 37) than in those treated with atorvastatin (n= 34) after only 2 weeks of treatment (P < 0.05) and remained higher, although not significantly, in patients treated with pitavastatin for 3 months [30]. Furthermore, improvements in endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilatation have been shown following pitavastatin treatment in people who smoke (Figure 4), an effect likely to reflect protection of endothelial cells against oxidative stress [49].


Pleiotropic effects of pitavastatin.

Davignon J - Br J Clin Pharmacol (2012)

Increase in endothelial-dependent vasodilation following 1 month of treatment with 2 mg pitavastatin daily in chronic smokers. Endothelial function was assessed noninvasively, using high-resolution ultrasound, by measuring endothelium-dependent and -independent dilation of the brachial artery by reactive hyperaemia and glycerol trinitrate, respectively. *P < 0.05 vs. patients not treated with pitavastatin. Reproduced with permission from Yoshida et al. [49]. FMD, endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation; GTD, endotheliumindependent glycerol trinitrate-induced vasodilatation. Controls (□); Pitavastatin (■)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376429&req=5

fig04: Increase in endothelial-dependent vasodilation following 1 month of treatment with 2 mg pitavastatin daily in chronic smokers. Endothelial function was assessed noninvasively, using high-resolution ultrasound, by measuring endothelium-dependent and -independent dilation of the brachial artery by reactive hyperaemia and glycerol trinitrate, respectively. *P < 0.05 vs. patients not treated with pitavastatin. Reproduced with permission from Yoshida et al. [49]. FMD, endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation; GTD, endotheliumindependent glycerol trinitrate-induced vasodilatation. Controls (□); Pitavastatin (■)
Mentions: The effects of statins on endothelial cells are associated with significant reductions in coronary artery disease (CAD), cerebrovascular disease and peripheral artery disease [3], and improvements in markers of endothelial function are observed during clinical use of pitavastatin. Fasting and postprandial forearm blood flow increased significantly (P < 0.05) during post ischaemic reactive hyperaemia in patients with CAD following 6 months of treatment with pitavastatin, but not in controls (Figure 3) [48]. Vasodilatation of the brachial artery was also increased after short term (2 weeks) treatment with pitavastatin in patients with primary hypercholesterolaemia. This increase was significantly greater in patients treated with pitavastatin (n= 37) than in those treated with atorvastatin (n= 34) after only 2 weeks of treatment (P < 0.05) and remained higher, although not significantly, in patients treated with pitavastatin for 3 months [30]. Furthermore, improvements in endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilatation have been shown following pitavastatin treatment in people who smoke (Figure 4), an effect likely to reflect protection of endothelial cells against oxidative stress [49].

Bottom Line: In addition to the direct effects of statins in reducing concentrations of atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), several studies have indicated that the beneficial effects of statins may be due to some of their cholesterol-independent, multiple (pleiotropic) effects which may differ between different members of the class.Pitavastatin is a novel synthetic lipophilic statin that has a number of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties distinct from those of other statins, which may underlie its potential pleiotropic benefits in reducing cardiovascular risk factors.It is concluded that the diverse pleiotropic actions of pitavastatin may contribute to reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality beyond that achieved through LDL-C reduction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hyperlipidemia and Atherosclerosis Research Group, Clinical Research Institute of Montréal (IRCM) and University of Montréal, QC, Canada. Jean.Davignon@ircm.qc.ca

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus