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The blue-collar brain.

Van Orden G, Hollis G, Wallot S - Front Physiol (2012)

Bottom Line: Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain.This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body.The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CAP Center for Cognition, Action and Perception, Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Time scales of behavior and brain were estimated from the time scales implicated in sine wave simulations of variation across repeated measurements (as in Figure 4). Landmarks of durations (day, week, etc.) or brain activity (Alpha, Gamma) are placed near their values in log10(Sec). This figure also includes the span of brain activity observed in the BOLD signal of brain metabolism used in fMRI studies, all to give context to the contrast between the span of time scales observed of behavior and the span of time scales observed of the brain (for reviews see Gilden, 2001; Buzsáki, 2006; Van Orden et al., 2011; van Rooij and Van Orden, 2011). The question mark to the right of the behavioral span symbolizes the fact that no upper bound short of death has yet been discovered in longitudinal studies estimating the presence of scaling relations in the variation across measurements of behavior.
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Figure 4: Time scales of behavior and brain were estimated from the time scales implicated in sine wave simulations of variation across repeated measurements (as in Figure 4). Landmarks of durations (day, week, etc.) or brain activity (Alpha, Gamma) are placed near their values in log10(Sec). This figure also includes the span of brain activity observed in the BOLD signal of brain metabolism used in fMRI studies, all to give context to the contrast between the span of time scales observed of behavior and the span of time scales observed of the brain (for reviews see Gilden, 2001; Buzsáki, 2006; Van Orden et al., 2011; van Rooij and Van Orden, 2011). The question mark to the right of the behavioral span symbolizes the fact that no upper bound short of death has yet been discovered in longitudinal studies estimating the presence of scaling relations in the variation across measurements of behavior.

Mentions: We created an idealized illustration of how the range of sale-free behavior observed across the time scales of behavior and brain might look together on the same graph, using the duration of the sine wave periods that would suffice to simulate the time scales of variation in repeated measurements of behavior and brain. The idealization appears in Figure 4. The behavioral data fill out the slower region of low-frequency high-power change on the logarithmic X- and Y-axes; the longest data set, to our knowledge, coming from a study lasting over a year (Delignieres et al., 2004). The powerful amplitudes of change in the behavioral data are several orders-of-magnitude larger than those of the brain data. The low amplitude changes of the brain are thus too weak and change too fast to be the causes of the much slower and more strongly varying changes of the body in behavior. Perhaps then the activities of the body somehow “cause” those of the brain.


The blue-collar brain.

Van Orden G, Hollis G, Wallot S - Front Physiol (2012)

Time scales of behavior and brain were estimated from the time scales implicated in sine wave simulations of variation across repeated measurements (as in Figure 4). Landmarks of durations (day, week, etc.) or brain activity (Alpha, Gamma) are placed near their values in log10(Sec). This figure also includes the span of brain activity observed in the BOLD signal of brain metabolism used in fMRI studies, all to give context to the contrast between the span of time scales observed of behavior and the span of time scales observed of the brain (for reviews see Gilden, 2001; Buzsáki, 2006; Van Orden et al., 2011; van Rooij and Van Orden, 2011). The question mark to the right of the behavioral span symbolizes the fact that no upper bound short of death has yet been discovered in longitudinal studies estimating the presence of scaling relations in the variation across measurements of behavior.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376425&req=5

Figure 4: Time scales of behavior and brain were estimated from the time scales implicated in sine wave simulations of variation across repeated measurements (as in Figure 4). Landmarks of durations (day, week, etc.) or brain activity (Alpha, Gamma) are placed near their values in log10(Sec). This figure also includes the span of brain activity observed in the BOLD signal of brain metabolism used in fMRI studies, all to give context to the contrast between the span of time scales observed of behavior and the span of time scales observed of the brain (for reviews see Gilden, 2001; Buzsáki, 2006; Van Orden et al., 2011; van Rooij and Van Orden, 2011). The question mark to the right of the behavioral span symbolizes the fact that no upper bound short of death has yet been discovered in longitudinal studies estimating the presence of scaling relations in the variation across measurements of behavior.
Mentions: We created an idealized illustration of how the range of sale-free behavior observed across the time scales of behavior and brain might look together on the same graph, using the duration of the sine wave periods that would suffice to simulate the time scales of variation in repeated measurements of behavior and brain. The idealization appears in Figure 4. The behavioral data fill out the slower region of low-frequency high-power change on the logarithmic X- and Y-axes; the longest data set, to our knowledge, coming from a study lasting over a year (Delignieres et al., 2004). The powerful amplitudes of change in the behavioral data are several orders-of-magnitude larger than those of the brain data. The low amplitude changes of the brain are thus too weak and change too fast to be the causes of the much slower and more strongly varying changes of the body in behavior. Perhaps then the activities of the body somehow “cause” those of the brain.

Bottom Line: Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain.This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body.The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CAP Center for Cognition, Action and Perception, Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

No MeSH data available.