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The blue-collar brain.

Van Orden G, Hollis G, Wallot S - Front Physiol (2012)

Bottom Line: Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain.This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body.The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CAP Center for Cognition, Action and Perception, Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

No MeSH data available.


The ordered trial-series of 1000 intervals between the button presses defining time estimates of 1 s (top) and an illustration of a spectral analysis of this time-series (bottom, right). Specific frequencies and magnitudes of change (lower left) are used to approximate the rough graph of the behavioral button-press data (top), and the outcome of the spectral analysis (lower right) on log–log axes. The spectral slope −α = −0.99 is close to idealized 1/f noise (−α = −1.00). The Y-axes in the illustrated sine waves have been adjusted to make smaller amplitude sine waves visible.
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Figure 3: The ordered trial-series of 1000 intervals between the button presses defining time estimates of 1 s (top) and an illustration of a spectral analysis of this time-series (bottom, right). Specific frequencies and magnitudes of change (lower left) are used to approximate the rough graph of the behavioral button-press data (top), and the outcome of the spectral analysis (lower right) on log–log axes. The spectral slope −α = −0.99 is close to idealized 1/f noise (−α = −1.00). The Y-axes in the illustrated sine waves have been adjusted to make smaller amplitude sine waves visible.

Mentions: Another fact begging for explanation is that, similar to the brain data, human performance data reveal a scale-free pattern (cf. Gilden, 2001), although it is possible to manipulate both patterns, to become more like white noise or brown noise (Van Orden et al., 2011; van Rooij and Van Orden, 2011). The performance data of the same volunteer, whose brain data appear in Figures 1 and 2, are portrayed in Figure 3. Each Y-value of a data point in the raw data series of Figure 3 is the estimate produced by the volunteer of the duration of 1 s – the volunteer pressed a key to mark the time of each second’s passing. The raw data are portrayed across the top of Figure 3. Each datum is portrayed in the order in which it was collected; the data value from the first estimated event time is leftmost on the X-axis of the raw data and the data value of the last estimated event time is rightmost on the X-axis.


The blue-collar brain.

Van Orden G, Hollis G, Wallot S - Front Physiol (2012)

The ordered trial-series of 1000 intervals between the button presses defining time estimates of 1 s (top) and an illustration of a spectral analysis of this time-series (bottom, right). Specific frequencies and magnitudes of change (lower left) are used to approximate the rough graph of the behavioral button-press data (top), and the outcome of the spectral analysis (lower right) on log–log axes. The spectral slope −α = −0.99 is close to idealized 1/f noise (−α = −1.00). The Y-axes in the illustrated sine waves have been adjusted to make smaller amplitude sine waves visible.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376425&req=5

Figure 3: The ordered trial-series of 1000 intervals between the button presses defining time estimates of 1 s (top) and an illustration of a spectral analysis of this time-series (bottom, right). Specific frequencies and magnitudes of change (lower left) are used to approximate the rough graph of the behavioral button-press data (top), and the outcome of the spectral analysis (lower right) on log–log axes. The spectral slope −α = −0.99 is close to idealized 1/f noise (−α = −1.00). The Y-axes in the illustrated sine waves have been adjusted to make smaller amplitude sine waves visible.
Mentions: Another fact begging for explanation is that, similar to the brain data, human performance data reveal a scale-free pattern (cf. Gilden, 2001), although it is possible to manipulate both patterns, to become more like white noise or brown noise (Van Orden et al., 2011; van Rooij and Van Orden, 2011). The performance data of the same volunteer, whose brain data appear in Figures 1 and 2, are portrayed in Figure 3. Each Y-value of a data point in the raw data series of Figure 3 is the estimate produced by the volunteer of the duration of 1 s – the volunteer pressed a key to mark the time of each second’s passing. The raw data are portrayed across the top of Figure 3. Each datum is portrayed in the order in which it was collected; the data value from the first estimated event time is leftmost on the X-axis of the raw data and the data value of the last estimated event time is rightmost on the X-axis.

Bottom Line: Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain.This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body.The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CAP Center for Cognition, Action and Perception, Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

No MeSH data available.