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The blue-collar brain.

Van Orden G, Hollis G, Wallot S - Front Physiol (2012)

Bottom Line: Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain.This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body.The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CAP Center for Cognition, Action and Perception, Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Ordered series of the single EEG-electrode recording from Figure 1 (top, left) and the resulting spectral plot (right) on log–log axes. The top panel includes 16 min of continuous EEG recordings. All other panels are subsets of the original data series. The first and last quarters of each data series are both deleted in each iteration, yielding eventually a data series that ran for 2 min (bottom). The scaling relation remains very similar for each nested series, close to idealized 1/f noise, and demonstrating the statistical self-similarity of the data series.
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Figure 2: Ordered series of the single EEG-electrode recording from Figure 1 (top, left) and the resulting spectral plot (right) on log–log axes. The top panel includes 16 min of continuous EEG recordings. All other panels are subsets of the original data series. The first and last quarters of each data series are both deleted in each iteration, yielding eventually a data series that ran for 2 min (bottom). The scaling relation remains very similar for each nested series, close to idealized 1/f noise, and demonstrating the statistical self-similarity of the data series.

Mentions: The scale-free pattern of the data in Figure 1 is further illustrated in Figure 2 by repeatedly zooming in to examine the middle half of the time-series of the EEG data. Each tighter frame on the EEG data reveals another self-similar pattern in the variation. This self-similar pattern is the predominant pattern of variation in EEG data and begs to be explained with a high priority. An explanation may begin with the apparent fact of the fractal pattern, that the same pattern is observed whether the focus is one half of the original data, one fourth of the original data, one eighth of the original data, and so on.


The blue-collar brain.

Van Orden G, Hollis G, Wallot S - Front Physiol (2012)

Ordered series of the single EEG-electrode recording from Figure 1 (top, left) and the resulting spectral plot (right) on log–log axes. The top panel includes 16 min of continuous EEG recordings. All other panels are subsets of the original data series. The first and last quarters of each data series are both deleted in each iteration, yielding eventually a data series that ran for 2 min (bottom). The scaling relation remains very similar for each nested series, close to idealized 1/f noise, and demonstrating the statistical self-similarity of the data series.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376425&req=5

Figure 2: Ordered series of the single EEG-electrode recording from Figure 1 (top, left) and the resulting spectral plot (right) on log–log axes. The top panel includes 16 min of continuous EEG recordings. All other panels are subsets of the original data series. The first and last quarters of each data series are both deleted in each iteration, yielding eventually a data series that ran for 2 min (bottom). The scaling relation remains very similar for each nested series, close to idealized 1/f noise, and demonstrating the statistical self-similarity of the data series.
Mentions: The scale-free pattern of the data in Figure 1 is further illustrated in Figure 2 by repeatedly zooming in to examine the middle half of the time-series of the EEG data. Each tighter frame on the EEG data reveals another self-similar pattern in the variation. This self-similar pattern is the predominant pattern of variation in EEG data and begs to be explained with a high priority. An explanation may begin with the apparent fact of the fractal pattern, that the same pattern is observed whether the focus is one half of the original data, one fourth of the original data, one eighth of the original data, and so on.

Bottom Line: Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain.This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body.The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CAP Center for Cognition, Action and Perception, Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue-collar role compared to the white-collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue-collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white-collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

No MeSH data available.