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Chronic atherosclerotic mesenteric ischemia that started to develop symptoms just after anaphylaxis.

Goto M, Matsuzaki M, Fuchinoue A, Urabe N, Kawagoe N, Takemoto I, Tanaka H, Watanabe T, Miyazaki T, Takeuchi M, Honda Y, Nakanishi K, Urita Y, Shimada N, Nakajima H, Sugimoto M, Goto T - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2012)

Bottom Line: Fear of eating resulted in malnutrition.She was prescribed proton pump inhibitor, digestants, anticholinergic agents, serine protease inhibitors, prokinetics, antiplatelet agents and transdermal nitroglycerin intermittently, but these had no beneficial effects.Developing a satisfactory patient-physician relationship was considered more effective for the management of persistent abdominal pain caused by complicated mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Medicine and Emergency Care, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
An 83-year-old woman was referred to our emergency department with acute urticaria and sudden shortness of breath approximately 30 min after taking rectal diclofenac potassium for lumbago. After treatment with adrenaline and corticosteroids, the patient became hemodynamically stable and left the hospital on the next day. She attended our hospital 1 week after the onset of anaphylaxis because of repeated postprandial epigastric pain. No abnormal lesions were found in endoscopy. Radiographic selective catheter angiography revealed chronic mesenteric ischemia caused by atherosclerosis and abundant collateral arteries between the celiac trunk, the superior mesenteric artery and the inferior mesenteric artery. Patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia usually present with a clinical syndrome characterized by painful abdominal cramps and colic occurring typically during the postprandial phase. Fear of eating resulted in malnutrition. She was prescribed proton pump inhibitor, digestants, anticholinergic agents, serine protease inhibitors, prokinetics, antiplatelet agents and transdermal nitroglycerin intermittently, but these had no beneficial effects. It was most probable that this patient with chronic atherosclerotic mesenteric ischemia was suffering from functional abdominal pain syndrome induced by anaphylaxis. Since psychiatric disorders were associated with alterations in the processing of visceral sensation, we facilitated the patient's understanding of functional abdominal pain syndrome with the psychologist. Postprandial abdominal pain gradually faded after administration of these drugs and the patient left the hospital. Developing a satisfactory patient-physician relationship was considered more effective for the management of persistent abdominal pain caused by complicated mechanisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Radiographic selective catheter angiography revealed chronic mesenteric ischemia caused by atherosclerosis and abundant collateral arteries (arrows) between the celiac trunk, the superior mesenteric artery and the inferior mesenteric artery.
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Figure 3: Radiographic selective catheter angiography revealed chronic mesenteric ischemia caused by atherosclerosis and abundant collateral arteries (arrows) between the celiac trunk, the superior mesenteric artery and the inferior mesenteric artery.

Mentions: No abnormal lesions were found in esophagogastroscopy, capsule endoscopy or colonoscopy. All findings of abdominal computed tomography except atherosclerosis were also almost normal (fig. 1). Abdominal ultrasonography was unable to measure the velocity of the celiac artery due to calcification of the arterial wall (fig. 2). No other vascular abnormalities were seen on ultrasonography. Radiographic selective catheter angiography revealed chronic mesenteric ischemia caused by atherosclerosis and abundant collateral arteries between the celiac trunk, the superior mesenteric artery and the inferior mesenteric artery (fig. 3).


Chronic atherosclerotic mesenteric ischemia that started to develop symptoms just after anaphylaxis.

Goto M, Matsuzaki M, Fuchinoue A, Urabe N, Kawagoe N, Takemoto I, Tanaka H, Watanabe T, Miyazaki T, Takeuchi M, Honda Y, Nakanishi K, Urita Y, Shimada N, Nakajima H, Sugimoto M, Goto T - Case Rep Gastroenterol (2012)

Radiographic selective catheter angiography revealed chronic mesenteric ischemia caused by atherosclerosis and abundant collateral arteries (arrows) between the celiac trunk, the superior mesenteric artery and the inferior mesenteric artery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376342&req=5

Figure 3: Radiographic selective catheter angiography revealed chronic mesenteric ischemia caused by atherosclerosis and abundant collateral arteries (arrows) between the celiac trunk, the superior mesenteric artery and the inferior mesenteric artery.
Mentions: No abnormal lesions were found in esophagogastroscopy, capsule endoscopy or colonoscopy. All findings of abdominal computed tomography except atherosclerosis were also almost normal (fig. 1). Abdominal ultrasonography was unable to measure the velocity of the celiac artery due to calcification of the arterial wall (fig. 2). No other vascular abnormalities were seen on ultrasonography. Radiographic selective catheter angiography revealed chronic mesenteric ischemia caused by atherosclerosis and abundant collateral arteries between the celiac trunk, the superior mesenteric artery and the inferior mesenteric artery (fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Fear of eating resulted in malnutrition.She was prescribed proton pump inhibitor, digestants, anticholinergic agents, serine protease inhibitors, prokinetics, antiplatelet agents and transdermal nitroglycerin intermittently, but these had no beneficial effects.Developing a satisfactory patient-physician relationship was considered more effective for the management of persistent abdominal pain caused by complicated mechanisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Medicine and Emergency Care, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
An 83-year-old woman was referred to our emergency department with acute urticaria and sudden shortness of breath approximately 30 min after taking rectal diclofenac potassium for lumbago. After treatment with adrenaline and corticosteroids, the patient became hemodynamically stable and left the hospital on the next day. She attended our hospital 1 week after the onset of anaphylaxis because of repeated postprandial epigastric pain. No abnormal lesions were found in endoscopy. Radiographic selective catheter angiography revealed chronic mesenteric ischemia caused by atherosclerosis and abundant collateral arteries between the celiac trunk, the superior mesenteric artery and the inferior mesenteric artery. Patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia usually present with a clinical syndrome characterized by painful abdominal cramps and colic occurring typically during the postprandial phase. Fear of eating resulted in malnutrition. She was prescribed proton pump inhibitor, digestants, anticholinergic agents, serine protease inhibitors, prokinetics, antiplatelet agents and transdermal nitroglycerin intermittently, but these had no beneficial effects. It was most probable that this patient with chronic atherosclerotic mesenteric ischemia was suffering from functional abdominal pain syndrome induced by anaphylaxis. Since psychiatric disorders were associated with alterations in the processing of visceral sensation, we facilitated the patient's understanding of functional abdominal pain syndrome with the psychologist. Postprandial abdominal pain gradually faded after administration of these drugs and the patient left the hospital. Developing a satisfactory patient-physician relationship was considered more effective for the management of persistent abdominal pain caused by complicated mechanisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus