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Carbon sequestration by fruit trees--Chinese apple orchards as an example.

Wu T, Wang Y, Yu C, Chiarawipa R, Zhang X, Han Z, Wu L - PLoS ONE (2012)

Bottom Line: The field study showed that the trees reached the peak of C sequestration capability when they were 18 years old, and then the capability began to decline with age.Carbon emission derived from management practices would not be compensated through C storage in apple trees before reaching the mature stage.The net C sink in apple orchards in China ranged from 14 to 32 Tg C, and C storage in biomass from 230 to 475 Tg C between 1990 and 2010.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Apple production systems are an important component in the Chinese agricultural sector with 1.99 million ha plantation. The orchards in China could play an important role in the carbon (C) cycle of terrestrial ecosystems and contribute to C sequestration. The carbon sequestration capability in apple orchards was analyzed through identifying a set of potential assessment factors and their weighting factors determined by a field model study and literature. The dynamics of the net C sink in apple orchards in China was estimated based on the apple orchard inventory data from 1990s and the capability analysis. The field study showed that the trees reached the peak of C sequestration capability when they were 18 years old, and then the capability began to decline with age. Carbon emission derived from management practices would not be compensated through C storage in apple trees before reaching the mature stage. The net C sink in apple orchards in China ranged from 14 to 32 Tg C, and C storage in biomass from 230 to 475 Tg C between 1990 and 2010. The estimated net C sequestration in Chinese apple orchards from 1990 to 2010 was equal to 4.5% of the total net C sink in the terrestrial ecosystems in China. Therefore, apple production systems can be potentially considered as C sinks excluding the energy associated with fruit production in addition to provide fruits.

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Distribution of apple grown area in China.The regions without colour indicate non-apple grown areas.
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pone-0038883-g001: Distribution of apple grown area in China.The regions without colour indicate non-apple grown areas.

Mentions: There are three geographical regions for apple production in China: the western, the central and the eastern regions. This study covered major apple regions in China (Figure 1), biomass data of apple trees at various ages from geographic locations was used to validate the allometric equations described in 2.2. The dynamics of the net C sink and C storage of apple orchards in China was calculated based on cultivation areas and tree age groups (Figure 2). The groups were set 0–7, 8–18 and 19–30 years old at national level.


Carbon sequestration by fruit trees--Chinese apple orchards as an example.

Wu T, Wang Y, Yu C, Chiarawipa R, Zhang X, Han Z, Wu L - PLoS ONE (2012)

Distribution of apple grown area in China.The regions without colour indicate non-apple grown areas.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376143&req=5

pone-0038883-g001: Distribution of apple grown area in China.The regions without colour indicate non-apple grown areas.
Mentions: There are three geographical regions for apple production in China: the western, the central and the eastern regions. This study covered major apple regions in China (Figure 1), biomass data of apple trees at various ages from geographic locations was used to validate the allometric equations described in 2.2. The dynamics of the net C sink and C storage of apple orchards in China was calculated based on cultivation areas and tree age groups (Figure 2). The groups were set 0–7, 8–18 and 19–30 years old at national level.

Bottom Line: The field study showed that the trees reached the peak of C sequestration capability when they were 18 years old, and then the capability began to decline with age.Carbon emission derived from management practices would not be compensated through C storage in apple trees before reaching the mature stage.The net C sink in apple orchards in China ranged from 14 to 32 Tg C, and C storage in biomass from 230 to 475 Tg C between 1990 and 2010.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Apple production systems are an important component in the Chinese agricultural sector with 1.99 million ha plantation. The orchards in China could play an important role in the carbon (C) cycle of terrestrial ecosystems and contribute to C sequestration. The carbon sequestration capability in apple orchards was analyzed through identifying a set of potential assessment factors and their weighting factors determined by a field model study and literature. The dynamics of the net C sink in apple orchards in China was estimated based on the apple orchard inventory data from 1990s and the capability analysis. The field study showed that the trees reached the peak of C sequestration capability when they were 18 years old, and then the capability began to decline with age. Carbon emission derived from management practices would not be compensated through C storage in apple trees before reaching the mature stage. The net C sink in apple orchards in China ranged from 14 to 32 Tg C, and C storage in biomass from 230 to 475 Tg C between 1990 and 2010. The estimated net C sequestration in Chinese apple orchards from 1990 to 2010 was equal to 4.5% of the total net C sink in the terrestrial ecosystems in China. Therefore, apple production systems can be potentially considered as C sinks excluding the energy associated with fruit production in addition to provide fruits.

Show MeSH