Limits...
Yogi Berra, Forrest Gump, and the discovery of Listeria actin comet tails.

Portnoy DA - Mol. Biol. Cell (2012)

Bottom Line: Using an electron microscope from the Sputnik era, they assembled a stunning collection of micrographs that illustrated how L. monocytogenes enters the host cell and exploits a host system of actin-based motility to move within cells and into neighboring cells without leaving the host cell cytosol.This research captured the imagination of cell biologists and microbiologists alike and led to novel insights into cytoskeletal dynamics.Potentially, the paper will be a classic."

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. portnoy@berkeley.edu

ABSTRACT
In 1988, eminent cell biologist Lew Tilney and newly appointed Assistant Professor of Microbiology Dan Portnoy met at a picnic and initiated a collaboration that led to a groundbreaking paper published in Journal of Cell Biology entitled "Actin filaments and the growth, movement, and spread of the intracellular bacterial parasite, Listeria monocytogenes." The paper has been cited more than 800 times, the most of any publication in the careers of both investigators. Using an electron microscope from the Sputnik era, they assembled a stunning collection of micrographs that illustrated how L. monocytogenes enters the host cell and exploits a host system of actin-based motility to move within cells and into neighboring cells without leaving the host cell cytosol. This research captured the imagination of cell biologists and microbiologists alike and led to novel insights into cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, Portnoy provides a retrospective that shares text from the original submission that was deleted at the time of publication, along with reviewers' comments ranging from "It is really just a show and tell paper and doesn';t have any meat" to "the finding will have major impact in cell biology and in medicine. Potentially, the paper will be a classic."

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Stages in the entry, growth, movement, and spread of Listeria from onemacrophage to another. Photographs illustrating all these intermediate stages have beenpresented in the figures in Tilney and Portnoy (1989). With copyright agreement fromRockefeller University Press.
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Figure 1: Stages in the entry, growth, movement, and spread of Listeria from onemacrophage to another. Photographs illustrating all these intermediate stages have beenpresented in the figures in Tilney and Portnoy (1989). With copyright agreement fromRockefeller University Press.

Mentions: However, we were unable to determine the spatial relationship of the actin filaments to thebacteria since we had scraped the infected cells from the dish. Lew decided that we should doa time course and fix in situ on plastic tissue culture-treated Petri dishes. Again, I laiddown cells on Monday and brought him the fixed samples on Tuesday. Most of the figures inTilney and Portnoy were derived from this experiment, and here he coined the term“comet tails.” In subsequent experiments, we verified that the filaments wereactin and examined their polarity by staining with the S1 fragment of myosin. The resultsexcited me, but I did not appreciate the big picture until Lew sent me a draft of a manuscriptfrom Woods Hole during winter break. Of importance, he had an artist draw a cartoon derivedfrom the micrographs (Figure 1). This figure eventuallylanded in many textbooks of microbiology and cell biology and seems to be used during theintroduction to almost every Listeria seminar. The impact of this figurecannot be overestimated.


Yogi Berra, Forrest Gump, and the discovery of Listeria actin comet tails.

Portnoy DA - Mol. Biol. Cell (2012)

Stages in the entry, growth, movement, and spread of Listeria from onemacrophage to another. Photographs illustrating all these intermediate stages have beenpresented in the figures in Tilney and Portnoy (1989). With copyright agreement fromRockefeller University Press.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3376002&req=5

Figure 1: Stages in the entry, growth, movement, and spread of Listeria from onemacrophage to another. Photographs illustrating all these intermediate stages have beenpresented in the figures in Tilney and Portnoy (1989). With copyright agreement fromRockefeller University Press.
Mentions: However, we were unable to determine the spatial relationship of the actin filaments to thebacteria since we had scraped the infected cells from the dish. Lew decided that we should doa time course and fix in situ on plastic tissue culture-treated Petri dishes. Again, I laiddown cells on Monday and brought him the fixed samples on Tuesday. Most of the figures inTilney and Portnoy were derived from this experiment, and here he coined the term“comet tails.” In subsequent experiments, we verified that the filaments wereactin and examined their polarity by staining with the S1 fragment of myosin. The resultsexcited me, but I did not appreciate the big picture until Lew sent me a draft of a manuscriptfrom Woods Hole during winter break. Of importance, he had an artist draw a cartoon derivedfrom the micrographs (Figure 1). This figure eventuallylanded in many textbooks of microbiology and cell biology and seems to be used during theintroduction to almost every Listeria seminar. The impact of this figurecannot be overestimated.

Bottom Line: Using an electron microscope from the Sputnik era, they assembled a stunning collection of micrographs that illustrated how L. monocytogenes enters the host cell and exploits a host system of actin-based motility to move within cells and into neighboring cells without leaving the host cell cytosol.This research captured the imagination of cell biologists and microbiologists alike and led to novel insights into cytoskeletal dynamics.Potentially, the paper will be a classic."

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. portnoy@berkeley.edu

ABSTRACT
In 1988, eminent cell biologist Lew Tilney and newly appointed Assistant Professor of Microbiology Dan Portnoy met at a picnic and initiated a collaboration that led to a groundbreaking paper published in Journal of Cell Biology entitled "Actin filaments and the growth, movement, and spread of the intracellular bacterial parasite, Listeria monocytogenes." The paper has been cited more than 800 times, the most of any publication in the careers of both investigators. Using an electron microscope from the Sputnik era, they assembled a stunning collection of micrographs that illustrated how L. monocytogenes enters the host cell and exploits a host system of actin-based motility to move within cells and into neighboring cells without leaving the host cell cytosol. This research captured the imagination of cell biologists and microbiologists alike and led to novel insights into cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, Portnoy provides a retrospective that shares text from the original submission that was deleted at the time of publication, along with reviewers' comments ranging from "It is really just a show and tell paper and doesn';t have any meat" to "the finding will have major impact in cell biology and in medicine. Potentially, the paper will be a classic."

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus