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Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama.

Estripeaut D, Aramburú MG, Sáez-Llorens X, Thompson HA, Dasch GA, Paddock CD, Zaki S, Eremeeva ME - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2007)

Bottom Line: We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s.Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues.Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital del Niño, Panama City, Panama.

ABSTRACT
We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Differentiation of Rickettsia rickettsii type strain Sheila Smith from Montana from R. rickettsii strains from Central and South America. A tandem repeat region corresponding to 563048–563028 nt of the strain Sheila Smith genome and flanking sequences were amplified with AF (5′-GTGATTGCTATATTTCGCTTT-3′) and AR (5′- CTAAGATTTGTTCCGTATAGG-3′) primers as described elsewhere (7). Repeat sequence (GCCTTAT, indicated with brackets) present in 3 copies in strain Sheila Smith, whereas only 2 copies were present in R. rickettsii isolates from Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Panama. Homologous sequences of these strains are deposited to GenBank under the following accession nos.: DQ666020, R. rickettsii strain Panama 2004; DQ666021, R. rickettsii strain Brazil; DQ666022, R. rickettsii strain Colombia; DQ666023, and R. rickettsii strain Costa Rica.
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Figure 2: Differentiation of Rickettsia rickettsii type strain Sheila Smith from Montana from R. rickettsii strains from Central and South America. A tandem repeat region corresponding to 563048–563028 nt of the strain Sheila Smith genome and flanking sequences were amplified with AF (5′-GTGATTGCTATATTTCGCTTT-3′) and AR (5′- CTAAGATTTGTTCCGTATAGG-3′) primers as described elsewhere (7). Repeat sequence (GCCTTAT, indicated with brackets) present in 3 copies in strain Sheila Smith, whereas only 2 copies were present in R. rickettsii isolates from Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Panama. Homologous sequences of these strains are deposited to GenBank under the following accession nos.: DQ666020, R. rickettsii strain Panama 2004; DQ666021, R. rickettsii strain Brazil; DQ666022, R. rickettsii strain Colombia; DQ666023, and R. rickettsii strain Costa Rica.

Mentions: Immunohistochemical evaluation of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues that used an immunoalkaline phosphatase technique demonstrated spotted fever group rickettsial antigens associated with rickettsia-like cells in vascular endothelium of multiple tissues, including heart (Figure 1), lung, adrenal gland, and kidney. Serum collected on the day of death had immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM microimmunofluoresence antibody titers of 2,048 to R. rickettsii antigen. DNA samples prepared from frozen brain, liver, lymph node, and spleen autopsy specimens were tested by PCR as described previously (7). When amplified, a 208-bp fragment of the conserved 17-kDa Rickettsia antigen gene showed spotted fever rickettsial DNA was present in all autopsy tissues. An OmpA gene fragment (70–602 nt) was amplified from brain and lymph node tissues (GenBank accession nos. DQ002503 and DQ002504). DNA sequencing of the ompA amplicons demonstrated that their nucleotide sequences were identical to each other and had 100% sequence similarity to the homologous ompA fragment of R. rickettsii strain Sheila Smith, isolated from a patient in Montana. An isolate of R. rickettsii (designated Panama 2004) was obtained from brain tissue in Vero E6 cells; its OmpA gene fragment (DQ164838) had 100% nucleotide sequence similarity to the reference sequence of R. rickettsii type strain Sheila Smith. R. rickettsii from Panama is similar to the other R. rickettsii strains circulating in Central and South America but differs from strain Sheila Smith in at least 1 locus containing tandemly repeated sequences (Figure 2).


Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama.

Estripeaut D, Aramburú MG, Sáez-Llorens X, Thompson HA, Dasch GA, Paddock CD, Zaki S, Eremeeva ME - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2007)

Differentiation of Rickettsia rickettsii type strain Sheila Smith from Montana from R. rickettsii strains from Central and South America. A tandem repeat region corresponding to 563048–563028 nt of the strain Sheila Smith genome and flanking sequences were amplified with AF (5′-GTGATTGCTATATTTCGCTTT-3′) and AR (5′- CTAAGATTTGTTCCGTATAGG-3′) primers as described elsewhere (7). Repeat sequence (GCCTTAT, indicated with brackets) present in 3 copies in strain Sheila Smith, whereas only 2 copies were present in R. rickettsii isolates from Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Panama. Homologous sequences of these strains are deposited to GenBank under the following accession nos.: DQ666020, R. rickettsii strain Panama 2004; DQ666021, R. rickettsii strain Brazil; DQ666022, R. rickettsii strain Colombia; DQ666023, and R. rickettsii strain Costa Rica.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375809&req=5

Figure 2: Differentiation of Rickettsia rickettsii type strain Sheila Smith from Montana from R. rickettsii strains from Central and South America. A tandem repeat region corresponding to 563048–563028 nt of the strain Sheila Smith genome and flanking sequences were amplified with AF (5′-GTGATTGCTATATTTCGCTTT-3′) and AR (5′- CTAAGATTTGTTCCGTATAGG-3′) primers as described elsewhere (7). Repeat sequence (GCCTTAT, indicated with brackets) present in 3 copies in strain Sheila Smith, whereas only 2 copies were present in R. rickettsii isolates from Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Panama. Homologous sequences of these strains are deposited to GenBank under the following accession nos.: DQ666020, R. rickettsii strain Panama 2004; DQ666021, R. rickettsii strain Brazil; DQ666022, R. rickettsii strain Colombia; DQ666023, and R. rickettsii strain Costa Rica.
Mentions: Immunohistochemical evaluation of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues that used an immunoalkaline phosphatase technique demonstrated spotted fever group rickettsial antigens associated with rickettsia-like cells in vascular endothelium of multiple tissues, including heart (Figure 1), lung, adrenal gland, and kidney. Serum collected on the day of death had immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM microimmunofluoresence antibody titers of 2,048 to R. rickettsii antigen. DNA samples prepared from frozen brain, liver, lymph node, and spleen autopsy specimens were tested by PCR as described previously (7). When amplified, a 208-bp fragment of the conserved 17-kDa Rickettsia antigen gene showed spotted fever rickettsial DNA was present in all autopsy tissues. An OmpA gene fragment (70–602 nt) was amplified from brain and lymph node tissues (GenBank accession nos. DQ002503 and DQ002504). DNA sequencing of the ompA amplicons demonstrated that their nucleotide sequences were identical to each other and had 100% sequence similarity to the homologous ompA fragment of R. rickettsii strain Sheila Smith, isolated from a patient in Montana. An isolate of R. rickettsii (designated Panama 2004) was obtained from brain tissue in Vero E6 cells; its OmpA gene fragment (DQ164838) had 100% nucleotide sequence similarity to the reference sequence of R. rickettsii type strain Sheila Smith. R. rickettsii from Panama is similar to the other R. rickettsii strains circulating in Central and South America but differs from strain Sheila Smith in at least 1 locus containing tandemly repeated sequences (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s.Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues.Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital del Niño, Panama City, Panama.

ABSTRACT
We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus