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Novel human herpesvirus 8 subtype D strains in Vanuatu, Melanesia.

Cassar O, Afonso PV, Bassot S, Plancoulaine S, Duprez R, Capuano C, Abel M, Martin PM, Gessain A - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2007)

Bottom Line: We show human herpesvirus 8 with diverse molecular subtype D variants to be highly endemic among the Ni-Vanuatu population.Most K1 genes were nearly identical to Polynesian strains, although a few clustered with Australian or Taiwanese strains.These results suggest diverse origins of the Ni-Vanuatu population and raise questions about the ancient human population movements in Melanesia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut Pasteur de Nouvelle-Calédonie, Nouméa, France.

ABSTRACT
We show human herpesvirus 8 with diverse molecular subtype D variants to be highly endemic among the Ni-Vanuatu population. Most K1 genes were nearly identical to Polynesian strains, although a few clustered with Australian or Taiwanese strains. These results suggest diverse origins of the Ni-Vanuatu population and raise questions about the ancient human population movements in Melanesia.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Unrooted phylogenetic tree generated by the neighbor joining (NJ) method with a 624-bp fragment of the K1 gene. The phylogeny was derived by the NJ method by using the GTR model in the PAUP program version 4.0b10 (Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA, USA). Reliability of the inferred tree was evaluated by bootstrap analysis on 1,000 replicates. Branch lengths are drawn to scale, with the bar indicating 0.1-nt replacement per site. Numbers on each node indicate the percentage of bootstrap samples (1,000) in which the cluster is supported. Only bootstrap values >75 are given. Not all samples have been labeled because of space constraints. The 30 new ORFK1 HHV-8 sequences (GenBank accession nos. EF589742–EF589771) were analyzed with 195 HHV-8 available sequences from the GenBank database.
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Figure 2: Unrooted phylogenetic tree generated by the neighbor joining (NJ) method with a 624-bp fragment of the K1 gene. The phylogeny was derived by the NJ method by using the GTR model in the PAUP program version 4.0b10 (Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA, USA). Reliability of the inferred tree was evaluated by bootstrap analysis on 1,000 replicates. Branch lengths are drawn to scale, with the bar indicating 0.1-nt replacement per site. Numbers on each node indicate the percentage of bootstrap samples (1,000) in which the cluster is supported. Only bootstrap values >75 are given. Not all samples have been labeled because of space constraints. The 30 new ORFK1 HHV-8 sequences (GenBank accession nos. EF589742–EF589771) were analyzed with 195 HHV-8 available sequences from the GenBank database.

Mentions: Phylogenetic analyses were performed on the 30 novel sequences obtained in this study, on all subtype D available K1 sequences, and on representatives of the different HHV-8 subtypes/subgroups, as described (4). The phylogenetic analyses were performed with all of the sequences available to date in GenBank. These sequences include 3 strains from Japan (J24, J25, and J26), 1 from Australia (3Au1), 1 from Taiwan (TKS10), 1 from New Zealand (ZKS3), and 1 from Wallis (WalKS1) (2,4, 6–8). Our results demonstrate that the Ni-Vanuatu HHV-8 clustered in 3 different genotype D subclades, which are highly supported phylogenetically with high bootstrap values of 99% or 100% (Figure 2). The first one comprising most strains corresponds to sequences closely related to each other and to the 2 Polynesian strains WalKS1 and ZKS3 (4,8). The second group (Loh/Santo), with only 4 sequences, was closely related to the Taiwanese strain TKS10 (8). The last 3 sequences from Motalava were nearly identical to the only strain from Australia (6).


Novel human herpesvirus 8 subtype D strains in Vanuatu, Melanesia.

Cassar O, Afonso PV, Bassot S, Plancoulaine S, Duprez R, Capuano C, Abel M, Martin PM, Gessain A - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2007)

Unrooted phylogenetic tree generated by the neighbor joining (NJ) method with a 624-bp fragment of the K1 gene. The phylogeny was derived by the NJ method by using the GTR model in the PAUP program version 4.0b10 (Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA, USA). Reliability of the inferred tree was evaluated by bootstrap analysis on 1,000 replicates. Branch lengths are drawn to scale, with the bar indicating 0.1-nt replacement per site. Numbers on each node indicate the percentage of bootstrap samples (1,000) in which the cluster is supported. Only bootstrap values >75 are given. Not all samples have been labeled because of space constraints. The 30 new ORFK1 HHV-8 sequences (GenBank accession nos. EF589742–EF589771) were analyzed with 195 HHV-8 available sequences from the GenBank database.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375799&req=5

Figure 2: Unrooted phylogenetic tree generated by the neighbor joining (NJ) method with a 624-bp fragment of the K1 gene. The phylogeny was derived by the NJ method by using the GTR model in the PAUP program version 4.0b10 (Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA, USA). Reliability of the inferred tree was evaluated by bootstrap analysis on 1,000 replicates. Branch lengths are drawn to scale, with the bar indicating 0.1-nt replacement per site. Numbers on each node indicate the percentage of bootstrap samples (1,000) in which the cluster is supported. Only bootstrap values >75 are given. Not all samples have been labeled because of space constraints. The 30 new ORFK1 HHV-8 sequences (GenBank accession nos. EF589742–EF589771) were analyzed with 195 HHV-8 available sequences from the GenBank database.
Mentions: Phylogenetic analyses were performed on the 30 novel sequences obtained in this study, on all subtype D available K1 sequences, and on representatives of the different HHV-8 subtypes/subgroups, as described (4). The phylogenetic analyses were performed with all of the sequences available to date in GenBank. These sequences include 3 strains from Japan (J24, J25, and J26), 1 from Australia (3Au1), 1 from Taiwan (TKS10), 1 from New Zealand (ZKS3), and 1 from Wallis (WalKS1) (2,4, 6–8). Our results demonstrate that the Ni-Vanuatu HHV-8 clustered in 3 different genotype D subclades, which are highly supported phylogenetically with high bootstrap values of 99% or 100% (Figure 2). The first one comprising most strains corresponds to sequences closely related to each other and to the 2 Polynesian strains WalKS1 and ZKS3 (4,8). The second group (Loh/Santo), with only 4 sequences, was closely related to the Taiwanese strain TKS10 (8). The last 3 sequences from Motalava were nearly identical to the only strain from Australia (6).

Bottom Line: We show human herpesvirus 8 with diverse molecular subtype D variants to be highly endemic among the Ni-Vanuatu population.Most K1 genes were nearly identical to Polynesian strains, although a few clustered with Australian or Taiwanese strains.These results suggest diverse origins of the Ni-Vanuatu population and raise questions about the ancient human population movements in Melanesia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut Pasteur de Nouvelle-Calédonie, Nouméa, France.

ABSTRACT
We show human herpesvirus 8 with diverse molecular subtype D variants to be highly endemic among the Ni-Vanuatu population. Most K1 genes were nearly identical to Polynesian strains, although a few clustered with Australian or Taiwanese strains. These results suggest diverse origins of the Ni-Vanuatu population and raise questions about the ancient human population movements in Melanesia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus