Limits...
Toward large-scale computational fluid-solid-growth models of intracranial aneurysms.

Di Achille P, Humphrey JD - Yale J Biol Med (2012)

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, this ultimate goal is extremely challenging given the many diverse and complex factors that control the natural history of these lesions.As it should be expected, therefore, predictive models continue to develop in stages, with new advances incorporated as data and computational methods permit.In this paper, we submit that large-scale, patient-specific, fluid-solid interaction models of the entire circle of Willis and included intracranial aneurysm are both computationally tractable and necessary as a critical step toward fluid-solid-growth (FSG) models that can address the evolution of a lesion while incorporating information on the genetically and mechanobiologically determined microstructure of the wall.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

ABSTRACT
Complementary advances in medical imaging, vascular biology, genetics, biomechanics, and computational methods promise to enable the development of mathematical models of the enlargement and possible rupture of intracranial aneurysms that can help inform clinical decisions. Nevertheless, this ultimate goal is extremely challenging given the many diverse and complex factors that control the natural history of these lesions. As it should be expected, therefore, predictive models continue to develop in stages, with new advances incorporated as data and computational methods permit. In this paper, we submit that large-scale, patient-specific, fluid-solid interaction models of the entire circle of Willis and included intracranial aneurysm are both computationally tractable and necessary as a critical step toward fluid-solid-growth (FSG) models that can address the evolution of a lesion while incorporating information on the genetically and mechanobiologically determined microstructure of the wall.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Similar to Figures 3 and 4, except for instantaneous pressure fields. In the lesion of Patient A (a), higher pressures were predicted within the impingement region rather than at the neck or fundus. For Patient B (b), the pressure was higher at the neck and fundus, but slightly smaller over most of the dome. Note: Color scale-bars were defined over reduced (not absolute minimum-to-maximum) ranges to highlight key features of the flow fields; minimal and maximal values were thus assigned colors corresponding to the smallest and largest values on the reduced scale.
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375664&req=5

Figure 5: Similar to Figures 3 and 4, except for instantaneous pressure fields. In the lesion of Patient A (a), higher pressures were predicted within the impingement region rather than at the neck or fundus. For Patient B (b), the pressure was higher at the neck and fundus, but slightly smaller over most of the dome. Note: Color scale-bars were defined over reduced (not absolute minimum-to-maximum) ranges to highlight key features of the flow fields; minimal and maximal values were thus assigned colors corresponding to the smallest and largest values on the reduced scale.

Mentions: Conditions imposed on the stiffness of the wall proved fundamental in calculating the pressure fields throughout the circle of Willis. For both patients, the rigid wall analyses predicted a systolic/diastolic pressure range of about 135/55 mmHg at the inlet vessels. The pressure drop that drove the flow (Pinlet — Poutlet) was ~7 to 8 mmHg at systole and 2 to 3 mmHg at diastole, much of which (~30 percent) occurred near the site of the lesion and toward one of the daughter vessels. Figure 5 reveals slight inhomogeneities overall in the pressure fields. For both patients, the pressure was smaller at the very last segment of the parent artery, before the neck of the aneurysm. In Patient A, pressure seemed to be higher in the impingement region than in the rest of the aneurysm where the field was almost uniformly distributed. In Patient B, there was a slightly larger pressure on the frontal neck and fundus of the aneurysm. On the back of the bleb, no differences could be noticed between the neck and the dome of the aneurysm.


Toward large-scale computational fluid-solid-growth models of intracranial aneurysms.

Di Achille P, Humphrey JD - Yale J Biol Med (2012)

Similar to Figures 3 and 4, except for instantaneous pressure fields. In the lesion of Patient A (a), higher pressures were predicted within the impingement region rather than at the neck or fundus. For Patient B (b), the pressure was higher at the neck and fundus, but slightly smaller over most of the dome. Note: Color scale-bars were defined over reduced (not absolute minimum-to-maximum) ranges to highlight key features of the flow fields; minimal and maximal values were thus assigned colors corresponding to the smallest and largest values on the reduced scale.
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375664&req=5

Figure 5: Similar to Figures 3 and 4, except for instantaneous pressure fields. In the lesion of Patient A (a), higher pressures were predicted within the impingement region rather than at the neck or fundus. For Patient B (b), the pressure was higher at the neck and fundus, but slightly smaller over most of the dome. Note: Color scale-bars were defined over reduced (not absolute minimum-to-maximum) ranges to highlight key features of the flow fields; minimal and maximal values were thus assigned colors corresponding to the smallest and largest values on the reduced scale.
Mentions: Conditions imposed on the stiffness of the wall proved fundamental in calculating the pressure fields throughout the circle of Willis. For both patients, the rigid wall analyses predicted a systolic/diastolic pressure range of about 135/55 mmHg at the inlet vessels. The pressure drop that drove the flow (Pinlet — Poutlet) was ~7 to 8 mmHg at systole and 2 to 3 mmHg at diastole, much of which (~30 percent) occurred near the site of the lesion and toward one of the daughter vessels. Figure 5 reveals slight inhomogeneities overall in the pressure fields. For both patients, the pressure was smaller at the very last segment of the parent artery, before the neck of the aneurysm. In Patient A, pressure seemed to be higher in the impingement region than in the rest of the aneurysm where the field was almost uniformly distributed. In Patient B, there was a slightly larger pressure on the frontal neck and fundus of the aneurysm. On the back of the bleb, no differences could be noticed between the neck and the dome of the aneurysm.

Bottom Line: Nevertheless, this ultimate goal is extremely challenging given the many diverse and complex factors that control the natural history of these lesions.As it should be expected, therefore, predictive models continue to develop in stages, with new advances incorporated as data and computational methods permit.In this paper, we submit that large-scale, patient-specific, fluid-solid interaction models of the entire circle of Willis and included intracranial aneurysm are both computationally tractable and necessary as a critical step toward fluid-solid-growth (FSG) models that can address the evolution of a lesion while incorporating information on the genetically and mechanobiologically determined microstructure of the wall.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.

ABSTRACT
Complementary advances in medical imaging, vascular biology, genetics, biomechanics, and computational methods promise to enable the development of mathematical models of the enlargement and possible rupture of intracranial aneurysms that can help inform clinical decisions. Nevertheless, this ultimate goal is extremely challenging given the many diverse and complex factors that control the natural history of these lesions. As it should be expected, therefore, predictive models continue to develop in stages, with new advances incorporated as data and computational methods permit. In this paper, we submit that large-scale, patient-specific, fluid-solid interaction models of the entire circle of Willis and included intracranial aneurysm are both computationally tractable and necessary as a critical step toward fluid-solid-growth (FSG) models that can address the evolution of a lesion while incorporating information on the genetically and mechanobiologically determined microstructure of the wall.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus