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Epidemiology of imported malaria in the mediterranean region.

Odolini S, Gautret P, Parola P - Mediterr J Hematol Infect Dis (2012)

Bottom Line: Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases of our time, causing 655 000 deaths during 2010 (WHO), most of them in sub-Saharan Africa and under the age of 5.During the last few years an increasing number of imported malaria cases is reported in Europe and Mediterranean countries, probably supported by the increasing number of international travel in association with the important influx of immigrants from malaria-endemic countries.Several cases of autochthonous malaria have recently been reported to support the need of an ongoing surveillance for mosquito control and an increased vigilance by health professionals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases of our time, causing 655 000 deaths during 2010 (WHO), most of them in sub-Saharan Africa and under the age of 5. During the last few years an increasing number of imported malaria cases is reported in Europe and Mediterranean countries, probably supported by the increasing number of international travel in association with the important influx of immigrants from malaria-endemic countries. Moreover, the presence of Anopheline vectors in Mediterranean countries, the returned infected travellers as a source of parasite and climate changes may result in the reappearance of malaria in countries where it was previously eradicated, such as Greece in recent years. Several cases of autochthonous malaria have recently been reported to support the need of an ongoing surveillance for mosquito control and an increased vigilance by health professionals. The aim of this paper is to critically review all the available literature about imported malaria in Mediterranean areas and the potential consequences of this.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Global Distribution (Robinson Projection) of Dominant or Potentially Important Malaria Vectors. From Kiszewksi et al., 2004. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 70(5):486–498. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/biology/mosquitoes/map.html
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f2-mjhid-4-1-e2012031: Global Distribution (Robinson Projection) of Dominant or Potentially Important Malaria Vectors. From Kiszewksi et al., 2004. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 70(5):486–498. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/biology/mosquitoes/map.html

Mentions: Anopheles atroparvus is an efficient malaria vector and it is widely distributed in Europe, except for some Mediterranean regions such as southern Italy, Greece and Turkey where Anopheles labranchiae and superpictus are prevalent (Figure 2). Several studies on the receptivity of the European vector Anopheles atroparvus reveal that it is not susceptible to the afro-tropical P.falciparum strains but is probably fully susceptible to infection by P.vivax strains imported from Africa.16


Epidemiology of imported malaria in the mediterranean region.

Odolini S, Gautret P, Parola P - Mediterr J Hematol Infect Dis (2012)

Global Distribution (Robinson Projection) of Dominant or Potentially Important Malaria Vectors. From Kiszewksi et al., 2004. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 70(5):486–498. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/biology/mosquitoes/map.html
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375659&req=5

f2-mjhid-4-1-e2012031: Global Distribution (Robinson Projection) of Dominant or Potentially Important Malaria Vectors. From Kiszewksi et al., 2004. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 70(5):486–498. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/biology/mosquitoes/map.html
Mentions: Anopheles atroparvus is an efficient malaria vector and it is widely distributed in Europe, except for some Mediterranean regions such as southern Italy, Greece and Turkey where Anopheles labranchiae and superpictus are prevalent (Figure 2). Several studies on the receptivity of the European vector Anopheles atroparvus reveal that it is not susceptible to the afro-tropical P.falciparum strains but is probably fully susceptible to infection by P.vivax strains imported from Africa.16

Bottom Line: Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases of our time, causing 655 000 deaths during 2010 (WHO), most of them in sub-Saharan Africa and under the age of 5.During the last few years an increasing number of imported malaria cases is reported in Europe and Mediterranean countries, probably supported by the increasing number of international travel in association with the important influx of immigrants from malaria-endemic countries.Several cases of autochthonous malaria have recently been reported to support the need of an ongoing surveillance for mosquito control and an increased vigilance by health professionals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Malaria is one of the most widespread infectious diseases of our time, causing 655 000 deaths during 2010 (WHO), most of them in sub-Saharan Africa and under the age of 5. During the last few years an increasing number of imported malaria cases is reported in Europe and Mediterranean countries, probably supported by the increasing number of international travel in association with the important influx of immigrants from malaria-endemic countries. Moreover, the presence of Anopheline vectors in Mediterranean countries, the returned infected travellers as a source of parasite and climate changes may result in the reappearance of malaria in countries where it was previously eradicated, such as Greece in recent years. Several cases of autochthonous malaria have recently been reported to support the need of an ongoing surveillance for mosquito control and an increased vigilance by health professionals. The aim of this paper is to critically review all the available literature about imported malaria in Mediterranean areas and the potential consequences of this.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus