Limits...
Understanding mobility in a social petri dish.

Szell M, Sinatra R, Petri G, Thurner S, Latora V - Sci Rep (2012)

Bottom Line: We find that the motion of individuals is not only constrained by physical distances, but also strongly shaped by the presence of socio-economic areas.These regions can be recovered perfectly by community detection methods solely based on the measured human dynamics.Moreover, we uncover that long-term memory in the time-order of visited locations is the essential ingredient for modeling the trajectories.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section for Science of Complex Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Spitalgasse 23, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT
Despite the recent availability of large data sets on human movements, a full understanding of the rules governing motion within social systems is still missing, due to incomplete information on the socio-economic factors and to often limited spatio-temporal resolutions. Here we study an entire society of individuals, the players of an online-game, with complete information on their movements in a network-shaped universe and on their social and economic interactions. Such a "socio-economic laboratory" allows to unveil the intricate interplay of spatial constraints, social and economic factors, and patterns of mobility. We find that the motion of individuals is not only constrained by physical distances, but also strongly shaped by the presence of socio-economic areas. These regions can be recovered perfectly by community detection methods solely based on the measured human dynamics. Moreover, we uncover that long-term memory in the time-order of visited locations is the essential ingredient for modeling the trajectories.

Show MeSH
The universe map of the massive multiplayer online game Pardus.The universe of Pardus can be represented as a network24 with N = 400 nodes, called sectors (playing the role of cities), and K = 1160 links. Sectors are organized into 20 different regions, called clusters, shown in the figure as different colour-shaded areas. There is no explicit set of goals in the game. Players are free to interact in a number of ways to e.g. increase their virtual wealth or status. Players move between sectors to interact with other players, e.g. to trade, attack, wage war, or to explore the virtual world.
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f1: The universe map of the massive multiplayer online game Pardus.The universe of Pardus can be represented as a network24 with N = 400 nodes, called sectors (playing the role of cities), and K = 1160 links. Sectors are organized into 20 different regions, called clusters, shown in the figure as different colour-shaded areas. There is no explicit set of goals in the game. Players are free to interact in a number of ways to e.g. increase their virtual wealth or status. Players move between sectors to interact with other players, e.g. to trade, attack, wage war, or to explore the virtual world.

Mentions: Pardus is a massive multiplayer online game running since 2004, with a worldwide player base of more than 350,000 individuals. It is an open-ended game whose players live in a virtual, futuristic universe and interact with each other in a multitude of ways. The topology of the universe can be represented as a network with 400 nodes, called sectors, embedded in a two-dimensional space, the so-called universe map shown in Fig. 1. Each sector is like a city where players can have social relations (establish new friendships, make enemies and wage wars), and entertain economic activities (trade and production of commodities). Typically, sectors adjacent on the universe map, as well as a few far-apart sectors, are interconnected by links which allow players to move from sector to sector. At any point in time, each sector is usually attended by a large number of players. The network is sparse and, similarly to other spatial networks, is not a small world. It has a characteristic path length L = 11.89 and a diameter dmax = 27, which means that, on average, players have to move through a non-negligible number of sectors to traverse the universe. See Supplementary Section S3 and Supplementary Table I for a detailed characterization of the universe network structure.


Understanding mobility in a social petri dish.

Szell M, Sinatra R, Petri G, Thurner S, Latora V - Sci Rep (2012)

The universe map of the massive multiplayer online game Pardus.The universe of Pardus can be represented as a network24 with N = 400 nodes, called sectors (playing the role of cities), and K = 1160 links. Sectors are organized into 20 different regions, called clusters, shown in the figure as different colour-shaded areas. There is no explicit set of goals in the game. Players are free to interact in a number of ways to e.g. increase their virtual wealth or status. Players move between sectors to interact with other players, e.g. to trade, attack, wage war, or to explore the virtual world.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375635&req=5

f1: The universe map of the massive multiplayer online game Pardus.The universe of Pardus can be represented as a network24 with N = 400 nodes, called sectors (playing the role of cities), and K = 1160 links. Sectors are organized into 20 different regions, called clusters, shown in the figure as different colour-shaded areas. There is no explicit set of goals in the game. Players are free to interact in a number of ways to e.g. increase their virtual wealth or status. Players move between sectors to interact with other players, e.g. to trade, attack, wage war, or to explore the virtual world.
Mentions: Pardus is a massive multiplayer online game running since 2004, with a worldwide player base of more than 350,000 individuals. It is an open-ended game whose players live in a virtual, futuristic universe and interact with each other in a multitude of ways. The topology of the universe can be represented as a network with 400 nodes, called sectors, embedded in a two-dimensional space, the so-called universe map shown in Fig. 1. Each sector is like a city where players can have social relations (establish new friendships, make enemies and wage wars), and entertain economic activities (trade and production of commodities). Typically, sectors adjacent on the universe map, as well as a few far-apart sectors, are interconnected by links which allow players to move from sector to sector. At any point in time, each sector is usually attended by a large number of players. The network is sparse and, similarly to other spatial networks, is not a small world. It has a characteristic path length L = 11.89 and a diameter dmax = 27, which means that, on average, players have to move through a non-negligible number of sectors to traverse the universe. See Supplementary Section S3 and Supplementary Table I for a detailed characterization of the universe network structure.

Bottom Line: We find that the motion of individuals is not only constrained by physical distances, but also strongly shaped by the presence of socio-economic areas.These regions can be recovered perfectly by community detection methods solely based on the measured human dynamics.Moreover, we uncover that long-term memory in the time-order of visited locations is the essential ingredient for modeling the trajectories.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section for Science of Complex Systems, Medical University of Vienna, Spitalgasse 23, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT
Despite the recent availability of large data sets on human movements, a full understanding of the rules governing motion within social systems is still missing, due to incomplete information on the socio-economic factors and to often limited spatio-temporal resolutions. Here we study an entire society of individuals, the players of an online-game, with complete information on their movements in a network-shaped universe and on their social and economic interactions. Such a "socio-economic laboratory" allows to unveil the intricate interplay of spatial constraints, social and economic factors, and patterns of mobility. We find that the motion of individuals is not only constrained by physical distances, but also strongly shaped by the presence of socio-economic areas. These regions can be recovered perfectly by community detection methods solely based on the measured human dynamics. Moreover, we uncover that long-term memory in the time-order of visited locations is the essential ingredient for modeling the trajectories.

Show MeSH