Limits...
Cross-sectional and longitudinal assessment of arterial stiffening with age in European and chinese populations.

Wojciechowska W, Li Y, Stolarz-Skrzypek K, Kawecka-Jaszcz K, Staessen JA, Wang JG, European Project on Genes in Hypertension and the JingNing Study Investigato - Front Physiol (2012)

Bottom Line: In cross-sectional analyses of the population samples cSBP consistently increased more with age than pSBP with the age-related increases being greater in women than men.Repeat assessment of pSBP and cSBP in 398 Europeans and 699 Chinese at a median interval approximately 4 years of follow-up confirmed that also within subjects cSBP rose steeper with aging than pSBP.In conclusion, with aging, pSBP approximates to cSBP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The First Department of Cardiology and Hypertension, Jagiellonian University Medical College Kraków, Poland.

ABSTRACT
As arteries become stiffer with aging, reflected waves move faster and augment late systolic pressure. Few studies have described the age-related changes in both peripheral and central systolic blood pressures in populations. We investigated the age dependency of peripheral (pSBP) and central (cSBP) systolic pressure and pressure amplification (i.e., difference between peripheral and central SBP) in randomly selected participants from European and Chinese populations. Data were collected in 1420 Europeans (mean age, 41.7 years) and 2044 (mean age, 45.1 years) Chinese. In cross-sectional analyses of the population samples cSBP consistently increased more with age than pSBP with the age-related increases being greater in women than men. Repeat assessment of pSBP and cSBP in 398 Europeans and 699 Chinese at a median interval approximately 4 years of follow-up confirmed that also within subjects cSBP rose steeper with aging than pSBP. In conclusion, with aging, pSBP approximates to cSBP. This might explain why in older subjects pSBP becomes the main predictor of cardiovascular complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chinese population. Peripheral and central SBPs at baseline and follow-up by quartiles of the age distribution in 369 women (A) and 330 men (B). All p-values for trend with age were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Significance of the difference between baseline and follow-up: *p < 0.05, ‡p < 0.01, and †p < 0.001. Reproduced with permission from Hypertension Research Journal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375628&req=5

Figure 2: Chinese population. Peripheral and central SBPs at baseline and follow-up by quartiles of the age distribution in 369 women (A) and 330 men (B). All p-values for trend with age were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Significance of the difference between baseline and follow-up: *p < 0.05, ‡p < 0.01, and †p < 0.001. Reproduced with permission from Hypertension Research Journal.

Mentions: In European study 208 women (24.4%) and 190 men (27.6%), underwent a repeat arterial examination at a median interval of 4.79 years (5th–95th percentile interval, 3.96–5.98 years (Wojciechowska et al., 2012). In the Chinese study 369 women (34.6%) and 330 men (33.7%) underwent a repeat assessment of peripheral and central systolic blood pressure at a median interval of 3.60 years (5th–95th percentile interval, 3.56–3.96 years; Li et al., 2012). In the longitudinal analyses, all changes from baseline to follow-up were significant (p ≤ 0.039). In the Caucasian populations, the annual increases in the peripheral and central systolic blood pressures averaged 0.91 and 1.06 mmHg in women, and 1.24 and 1.47 mmHg in men. The p-values for the sex differences were 0.12 and 0.08, respectively (Wojciechowska et al., 2012). In Chinese population peripheral systolic pressure increased more (p ≤ 0.025) than the central systolic pressure both in women (2.35 vs. 2.12 mm Hg) and in men (1.37 vs. 1.16 mm Hg). On a relative scale, the percentage increases in peripheral and central systolic blood pressure from baseline to follow-up were similar in women (2.14 vs. 2.16% per year; p = 0.76), as well as in men (1.33 vs. 1.34% per year; p = 0.96;). In sensitivity analyses stratified by quartiles of the age distribution, the increase in peripheral systolic blood pressure was larger than that in central systolic blood pressure (p ≤ 0.02) above median age in women and above the 75th percentile of age in men, whereas in all other sex–age subgroups, the increases of peripheral and central systolic pressures were similar (p ≥ 0.08; Figure 2; Li et al., 2012).


Cross-sectional and longitudinal assessment of arterial stiffening with age in European and chinese populations.

Wojciechowska W, Li Y, Stolarz-Skrzypek K, Kawecka-Jaszcz K, Staessen JA, Wang JG, European Project on Genes in Hypertension and the JingNing Study Investigato - Front Physiol (2012)

Chinese population. Peripheral and central SBPs at baseline and follow-up by quartiles of the age distribution in 369 women (A) and 330 men (B). All p-values for trend with age were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Significance of the difference between baseline and follow-up: *p < 0.05, ‡p < 0.01, and †p < 0.001. Reproduced with permission from Hypertension Research Journal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375628&req=5

Figure 2: Chinese population. Peripheral and central SBPs at baseline and follow-up by quartiles of the age distribution in 369 women (A) and 330 men (B). All p-values for trend with age were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Significance of the difference between baseline and follow-up: *p < 0.05, ‡p < 0.01, and †p < 0.001. Reproduced with permission from Hypertension Research Journal.
Mentions: In European study 208 women (24.4%) and 190 men (27.6%), underwent a repeat arterial examination at a median interval of 4.79 years (5th–95th percentile interval, 3.96–5.98 years (Wojciechowska et al., 2012). In the Chinese study 369 women (34.6%) and 330 men (33.7%) underwent a repeat assessment of peripheral and central systolic blood pressure at a median interval of 3.60 years (5th–95th percentile interval, 3.56–3.96 years; Li et al., 2012). In the longitudinal analyses, all changes from baseline to follow-up were significant (p ≤ 0.039). In the Caucasian populations, the annual increases in the peripheral and central systolic blood pressures averaged 0.91 and 1.06 mmHg in women, and 1.24 and 1.47 mmHg in men. The p-values for the sex differences were 0.12 and 0.08, respectively (Wojciechowska et al., 2012). In Chinese population peripheral systolic pressure increased more (p ≤ 0.025) than the central systolic pressure both in women (2.35 vs. 2.12 mm Hg) and in men (1.37 vs. 1.16 mm Hg). On a relative scale, the percentage increases in peripheral and central systolic blood pressure from baseline to follow-up were similar in women (2.14 vs. 2.16% per year; p = 0.76), as well as in men (1.33 vs. 1.34% per year; p = 0.96;). In sensitivity analyses stratified by quartiles of the age distribution, the increase in peripheral systolic blood pressure was larger than that in central systolic blood pressure (p ≤ 0.02) above median age in women and above the 75th percentile of age in men, whereas in all other sex–age subgroups, the increases of peripheral and central systolic pressures were similar (p ≥ 0.08; Figure 2; Li et al., 2012).

Bottom Line: In cross-sectional analyses of the population samples cSBP consistently increased more with age than pSBP with the age-related increases being greater in women than men.Repeat assessment of pSBP and cSBP in 398 Europeans and 699 Chinese at a median interval approximately 4 years of follow-up confirmed that also within subjects cSBP rose steeper with aging than pSBP.In conclusion, with aging, pSBP approximates to cSBP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The First Department of Cardiology and Hypertension, Jagiellonian University Medical College Kraków, Poland.

ABSTRACT
As arteries become stiffer with aging, reflected waves move faster and augment late systolic pressure. Few studies have described the age-related changes in both peripheral and central systolic blood pressures in populations. We investigated the age dependency of peripheral (pSBP) and central (cSBP) systolic pressure and pressure amplification (i.e., difference between peripheral and central SBP) in randomly selected participants from European and Chinese populations. Data were collected in 1420 Europeans (mean age, 41.7 years) and 2044 (mean age, 45.1 years) Chinese. In cross-sectional analyses of the population samples cSBP consistently increased more with age than pSBP with the age-related increases being greater in women than men. Repeat assessment of pSBP and cSBP in 398 Europeans and 699 Chinese at a median interval approximately 4 years of follow-up confirmed that also within subjects cSBP rose steeper with aging than pSBP. In conclusion, with aging, pSBP approximates to cSBP. This might explain why in older subjects pSBP becomes the main predictor of cardiovascular complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus