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Top-down modulation of the perception of other people in schizophrenia and autism.

Cook J, Barbalat G, Blakemore SJ - Front Hum Neurosci (2012)

Bottom Line: Accurate social perception of this kind does not solely rely on "bottom-up" visual processing but is also subject to modulation by "top-down" signals.Top-down modulation is also important in our reactions to others.This paper highlights the importance of top-down modulation in our perception of, and reactions to, others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Accurately and efficiently perceiving social cues such as body movements and facial expressions is important in social interaction. Accurate social perception of this kind does not solely rely on "bottom-up" visual processing but is also subject to modulation by "top-down" signals. For example, if instructed to look for signs of happiness rather than fear, participants are more likely to categorize facial expressions as happy-this prior expectation biases subsequent perception. Top-down modulation is also important in our reactions to others. For example, top-down control over imitation plays an important role in the development of smooth and harmonious social interactions. This paper highlights the importance of top-down modulation in our perception of, and reactions to, others. We discuss evidence that top-down modulation of social perception and imitation is atypical in Autism Spectrum Conditions and in schizophrenia, and we consider the effect this may have on the development of social interactions for individuals with these developmental disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Abnormal connectivity in the brain in ASC. Compared to control participants individuals with ASC showed a significantly increased effect of dPFC on IFG and reduced effect of IPL on IFG. STS, superior temporal sulcus; IPL, inferior parietal lobule; IFG, inferior frontal gyrus; dPFC, dorsal prefrontal cortex. Figure is reproduced, with permission, from Shih et al. (2010).
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Figure 4: Abnormal connectivity in the brain in ASC. Compared to control participants individuals with ASC showed a significantly increased effect of dPFC on IFG and reduced effect of IPL on IFG. STS, superior temporal sulcus; IPL, inferior parietal lobule; IFG, inferior frontal gyrus; dPFC, dorsal prefrontal cortex. Figure is reproduced, with permission, from Shih et al. (2010).

Mentions: Recent functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) studies have suggested that functional connectivity between social brain regions such as the mPFC and MNS is atypical in ASC. Intrinsic fcMRI detects the temporal correlation between spatially discrete low-frequency fluctuations of the BOLD signal. Shih et al. (2010) used fcMRI to investigate the intrinsic connectivity of brain areas associated with imitation and its control: the mPFC, IFG, inferior parietal lobe (IPL) and STS. FMRI data were collected while participants performed a non-imitative task (semantic decision/letter detection). The influence of PFC on MNS activity was atypical in ASC (Figure 4). In individuals with ASC under connectivity between frontal and posterior regions, during mentalising, has also been reported (Castelli et al., 2002; Kana et al., 2009).


Top-down modulation of the perception of other people in schizophrenia and autism.

Cook J, Barbalat G, Blakemore SJ - Front Hum Neurosci (2012)

Abnormal connectivity in the brain in ASC. Compared to control participants individuals with ASC showed a significantly increased effect of dPFC on IFG and reduced effect of IPL on IFG. STS, superior temporal sulcus; IPL, inferior parietal lobule; IFG, inferior frontal gyrus; dPFC, dorsal prefrontal cortex. Figure is reproduced, with permission, from Shih et al. (2010).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375615&req=5

Figure 4: Abnormal connectivity in the brain in ASC. Compared to control participants individuals with ASC showed a significantly increased effect of dPFC on IFG and reduced effect of IPL on IFG. STS, superior temporal sulcus; IPL, inferior parietal lobule; IFG, inferior frontal gyrus; dPFC, dorsal prefrontal cortex. Figure is reproduced, with permission, from Shih et al. (2010).
Mentions: Recent functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) studies have suggested that functional connectivity between social brain regions such as the mPFC and MNS is atypical in ASC. Intrinsic fcMRI detects the temporal correlation between spatially discrete low-frequency fluctuations of the BOLD signal. Shih et al. (2010) used fcMRI to investigate the intrinsic connectivity of brain areas associated with imitation and its control: the mPFC, IFG, inferior parietal lobe (IPL) and STS. FMRI data were collected while participants performed a non-imitative task (semantic decision/letter detection). The influence of PFC on MNS activity was atypical in ASC (Figure 4). In individuals with ASC under connectivity between frontal and posterior regions, during mentalising, has also been reported (Castelli et al., 2002; Kana et al., 2009).

Bottom Line: Accurate social perception of this kind does not solely rely on "bottom-up" visual processing but is also subject to modulation by "top-down" signals.Top-down modulation is also important in our reactions to others.This paper highlights the importance of top-down modulation in our perception of, and reactions to, others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Accurately and efficiently perceiving social cues such as body movements and facial expressions is important in social interaction. Accurate social perception of this kind does not solely rely on "bottom-up" visual processing but is also subject to modulation by "top-down" signals. For example, if instructed to look for signs of happiness rather than fear, participants are more likely to categorize facial expressions as happy-this prior expectation biases subsequent perception. Top-down modulation is also important in our reactions to others. For example, top-down control over imitation plays an important role in the development of smooth and harmonious social interactions. This paper highlights the importance of top-down modulation in our perception of, and reactions to, others. We discuss evidence that top-down modulation of social perception and imitation is atypical in Autism Spectrum Conditions and in schizophrenia, and we consider the effect this may have on the development of social interactions for individuals with these developmental disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus