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Persistent perceptual delay for head movement onset relative to auditory stimuli of different durations and rise times.

Barnett-Cowan M, Raeder SM, Bülthoff HH - Exp Brain Res (2012)

Bottom Line: It has been recently reported, however, that despite having similar transduction latencies, vestibular stimuli are perceived significantly later than auditory stimuli when simultaneously generated.Head movements paired with long square sounds (~100 ms) were not significantly different than brief sounds.Rather, differences between sound conditions were found to be attributable to variability in the time for head movement to reach peak velocity: the head moved faster when paired with a brief sound.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany. mbarnettcowan@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
The perception of simultaneity between auditory and vestibular information is crucially important for maintaining a coherent representation of the acoustic environment whenever the head moves. It has been recently reported, however, that despite having similar transduction latencies, vestibular stimuli are perceived significantly later than auditory stimuli when simultaneously generated. This suggests that perceptual latency of a head movement is longer than a co-occurring sound. However, these studies paired a vestibular stimulation of long duration (~1 s) and of a continuously changing temporal envelope with a brief (10-50 ms) sound pulse. In the present study, the stimuli were matched for temporal envelope duration and shape. Participants judged the temporal order of the two stimuli, the onset of an active head movement and the onset of brief (50 ms) or long (1,400 ms) sounds with a square- or raised-cosine-shaped envelope. Consistent with previous reports, head movement onset had to precede the onset of a brief sound by about 73 ms in order for the stimuli to be perceived as simultaneous. Head movements paired with long square sounds (~100 ms) were not significantly different than brief sounds. Surprisingly, head movements paired with long raised-cosine sound (~115 ms) had to be presented even earlier than brief stimuli. This additional lead time could not be accounted for by differences in the comparison stimulus characteristics (temporal envelope duration and shape). Rather, differences between sound conditions were found to be attributable to variability in the time for head movement to reach peak velocity: the head moved faster when paired with a brief sound. The persistent lead time required for vestibular stimulation provides further evidence that the perceptual latency of vestibular stimulation is greater than the other senses.

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Average time to reach peak velocity as a function of PSS. A significant negative correlation here indicates that delays in reaching peak velocity largely account for the additional head movement lead time (negative shift of the PSS) that was found among sound conditions. Note that most data points are in the negative direction relative to 0. Dashed lines represent 95 % confidence intervals
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Fig5: Average time to reach peak velocity as a function of PSS. A significant negative correlation here indicates that delays in reaching peak velocity largely account for the additional head movement lead time (negative shift of the PSS) that was found among sound conditions. Note that most data points are in the negative direction relative to 0. Dashed lines represent 95 % confidence intervals

Mentions: Correlation analysis comparing head movement properties with the PSS revealed a significant negative correlation between the time to reach peak velocity and the PSS (r(15) = −0.537, p = 0.039; Fig. 5). Note that data across the sound conditions were pooled within each participant and then entered into the Pearson’s product–moment correlation as suggested by Bland and Altman (1994) in order to account for repeated data. This result, paired with results from experiment 2, showing no PSS differences between the sound stimuli, suggests that no additional lead time is required of head movement when paired with a sound of similar temporal envelope duration and shape.Fig. 5


Persistent perceptual delay for head movement onset relative to auditory stimuli of different durations and rise times.

Barnett-Cowan M, Raeder SM, Bülthoff HH - Exp Brain Res (2012)

Average time to reach peak velocity as a function of PSS. A significant negative correlation here indicates that delays in reaching peak velocity largely account for the additional head movement lead time (negative shift of the PSS) that was found among sound conditions. Note that most data points are in the negative direction relative to 0. Dashed lines represent 95 % confidence intervals
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3375482&req=5

Fig5: Average time to reach peak velocity as a function of PSS. A significant negative correlation here indicates that delays in reaching peak velocity largely account for the additional head movement lead time (negative shift of the PSS) that was found among sound conditions. Note that most data points are in the negative direction relative to 0. Dashed lines represent 95 % confidence intervals
Mentions: Correlation analysis comparing head movement properties with the PSS revealed a significant negative correlation between the time to reach peak velocity and the PSS (r(15) = −0.537, p = 0.039; Fig. 5). Note that data across the sound conditions were pooled within each participant and then entered into the Pearson’s product–moment correlation as suggested by Bland and Altman (1994) in order to account for repeated data. This result, paired with results from experiment 2, showing no PSS differences between the sound stimuli, suggests that no additional lead time is required of head movement when paired with a sound of similar temporal envelope duration and shape.Fig. 5

Bottom Line: It has been recently reported, however, that despite having similar transduction latencies, vestibular stimuli are perceived significantly later than auditory stimuli when simultaneously generated.Head movements paired with long square sounds (~100 ms) were not significantly different than brief sounds.Rather, differences between sound conditions were found to be attributable to variability in the time for head movement to reach peak velocity: the head moved faster when paired with a brief sound.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany. mbarnettcowan@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
The perception of simultaneity between auditory and vestibular information is crucially important for maintaining a coherent representation of the acoustic environment whenever the head moves. It has been recently reported, however, that despite having similar transduction latencies, vestibular stimuli are perceived significantly later than auditory stimuli when simultaneously generated. This suggests that perceptual latency of a head movement is longer than a co-occurring sound. However, these studies paired a vestibular stimulation of long duration (~1 s) and of a continuously changing temporal envelope with a brief (10-50 ms) sound pulse. In the present study, the stimuli were matched for temporal envelope duration and shape. Participants judged the temporal order of the two stimuli, the onset of an active head movement and the onset of brief (50 ms) or long (1,400 ms) sounds with a square- or raised-cosine-shaped envelope. Consistent with previous reports, head movement onset had to precede the onset of a brief sound by about 73 ms in order for the stimuli to be perceived as simultaneous. Head movements paired with long square sounds (~100 ms) were not significantly different than brief sounds. Surprisingly, head movements paired with long raised-cosine sound (~115 ms) had to be presented even earlier than brief stimuli. This additional lead time could not be accounted for by differences in the comparison stimulus characteristics (temporal envelope duration and shape). Rather, differences between sound conditions were found to be attributable to variability in the time for head movement to reach peak velocity: the head moved faster when paired with a brief sound. The persistent lead time required for vestibular stimulation provides further evidence that the perceptual latency of vestibular stimulation is greater than the other senses.

Show MeSH